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Going to miss out on an A* in English because my teachers won't mark my coursework... watch

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    (Original post by overtherainbow)
    they can get into trouble for giving you too many drafts officially (only ever heard on teacher actually have this issue though)- i only ever got one in all my subjects that was normal and we never moaned.

    also they dont like top give out actual marks becasue it can change when its standardised quite a lot in subjective subjects
    Okay.
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    Go to another one, calmly explain the best one how important it is, and be quite firm. Try your year head but parents complaint is your best bit in my opinion.
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    Firstly, little details matter an awful lot. Besides, if you've already decided what details matter and what don't, then why are you trying to get a second opinion on it?

    Secondly, it's coursework. Teachers can't mark it, give it back to you and let you correct the mistakes, then mark it again, and so forth. If that were the case, anyone who cared a toss about their academics would come out with 100% every time!!
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    (Original post by LornaSandison1)
    Firstly, little details matter an awful lot. Besides, if you've already decided what details matter and what don't, then why are you trying to get a second opinion on it?

    Secondly, it's coursework. Teachers can't mark it, give it back to you and let you correct the mistakes, then mark it again, and so forth. If that were the case, anyone who cared a toss about their academics would come out with 100% every time!!
    I came here to vent my anger really, and advice is always nice because people come up with some pretty good ideas a lot of the time.

    And as for your second point, that is what drafts are for. I don't understand what you mean. We have to hand in all our drafts alongside our final piece just to prove that we have built on it and improved it...

    Edit - People who care about their academics should be helped surely? There are still many people I know who just don't care and procrastinate and they will fail no doubt, so when you imply that people who care shouldn't get 100%, then I'm afraid I don't agree. People who make the effort should attain better grades, whether that is a C, a B, an A or an A*. And that doesn't mean they need to get their coursework marked 20 times a week; just a few drafts before the final one.
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    (Original post by A level Az)
    I came here to vent my anger really, and advice is always nice because people come up with some pretty good ideas a lot of the time.

    And as for your second point, that is what drafts are for. I don't understand what you mean. We have to hand in all our drafts alongside our final piece just to prove that we have built on it and improved it...

    Edit - People who care about their academics should be helped surely? There are still many people I know who just don't care and procrastinate and they will fail no doubt, so when you imply that people who care shouldn't get 100%, then I'm afraid I don't agree. People who make the effort should attain better grades, whether that is a C, a B, an A or an A*. And that doesn't mean they need to get their coursework marked 20 times a week; just a few drafts before the final one.
    I'm not saying that people who care about their coursework shouldn't get 100%, but it shouldn't be so easy to do so, otherwise that would be defeating the point of coursework. I.e. if you get it marked over and over and over again, then in theory, you should come out with a near-perfect answer, which isn't really a good judgement of your ability.

    I think the exam board would come down hard if they found out that a school was marking drafts and giving them back to students to rewrite. My school are very specific - they can give 'general' advice such as 'you might want to rethink this paragraph' (but not say specifically why) so you have to figure it out for yourself and produce a piece which more-or-less reflects your true ability in the subject.

    I understand the importance of improving drafts, but if it's guided by a teacher 'marking' your draft and giving detailed feedback, it's pointless and unfair.
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    (Original post by LornaSandison1)
    I'm not saying that people who care about their coursework shouldn't get 100%, but it shouldn't be so easy to do so, otherwise that would be defeating the point of coursework. I.e. if you get it marked over and over and over again, then in theory, you should come out with a near-perfect answer, which isn't really a good judgement of your ability.

    I think the exam board would come down hard if they found out that a school was marking drafts and giving them back to students to rewrite. My school are very specific - they can give 'general' advice such as 'you might want to rethink this paragraph' (but not say specifically why) so you have to figure it out for yourself and produce a piece which more-or-less reflects your true ability in the subject.

    I understand the importance of improving drafts, but if it's guided by a teacher 'marking' your draft and giving detailed feedback, it's pointless and unfair.
    Okay, I see your point. I do strongly believe that the teacher should let you know roughly whereabouts your coursework is gradewise before you hand in your final draft, as from what I've learned during my time in my school is that coursework is something that you should definately be hitting your target grades at. But yes, general advice I am okay with, but my teacher's haven't even been reading it, let alone giving me advice But yeah, enough complaining from me, I need to get on with it regardless.
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    i feel your pain.
    i want an a* - don't get me wrong, i only need an A, but thats not the point.
    my a2 teacher is working solidly with me to work a piece that is of top quality, and, although i know of some teachers that are less that heplful, this is, again, not the point.
    your teacher should be doing everything to help, just keep badgering them, if not, go to the head.

    There will be SOMEONE who actually understands, in your school. If not, well, thats mental.
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    (Original post by LornaSandison1)
    I'm not saying that people who care about their coursework shouldn't get 100%, but it shouldn't be so easy to do so, otherwise that would be defeating the point of coursework. I.e. if you get it marked over and over and over again, then in theory, you should come out with a near-perfect answer, which isn't really a good judgement of your ability.

    I think the exam board would come down hard if they found out that a school was marking drafts and giving them back to students to rewrite. My school are very specific - they can give 'general' advice such as 'you might want to rethink this paragraph' (but not say specifically why) so you have to figure it out for yourself and produce a piece which more-or-less reflects your true ability in the subject.

    I understand the importance of improving drafts, but if it's guided by a teacher 'marking' your draft and giving detailed feedback, it's pointless and unfair.

    My school won't mark drafts at all, they read over them and then do the vague "maybe you could change this introduction a little" or "are you sure you have enough context in this essay?" OP is lucky they got one draft really
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    (Original post by A level Az)
    I do have the AO sheet, but English is so subjective that I find it difficult to accurately mark my own work. Like, how am I supposed to judge originality (one of the requirements for the top marks)? I don't have anything to compare my work to because I don't mark coursework for a living, and similiar (subjective) criteria make it very hard to mark my own work. I'll give it a try again though.
    If I were you, I would go and storm into the Headmaster's office and demand he did something about it! Him, or my Head of 6th form...obviously it's different at different schools, but any HALFWAY decent head would see how unreasonable this is (their neck is on the line with grades so they'll care more) and, if this helps, they a) often don't side with teachers complaining they've got too much work as it's union-limited and senior staff almost always do much more as they're the only teachers allowed to not work to union rules, and b) in my experience they were often originally english teachers so if yours is, that could be helpful! Also, if you do see a senior staff member about this, threaten your parents coming in to complain even if you know they won't - it's something teachers will do A LOT to get out of in a lot of circumstances, because if too many do then the school has to open incompetency proceedings etc. and it's messy and long and time-consuming...anyway, my advice would definitely be don't stand for this and take it higher! Hope you manage the A* in the end anyway
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    (Original post by A level Az)
    Okay, I see your point. I do strongly believe that the teacher should let you know roughly whereabouts your coursework is gradewise before you hand in your final draft, as from what I've learned during my time in my school is that coursework is something that you should definately be hitting your target grades at. But yes, general advice I am okay with, but my teacher's haven't even been reading it, let alone giving me advice But yeah, enough complaining from me, I need to get on with it regardless.
    Hmm, well if your teacher refuses to even give you general advice, then that's not really very fair (although I don't think it's against the rules of the exam boards, unfortunately). You could try speaking to your head of year maybe?
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    (Original post by juliewho)
    My school won't mark drafts at all, they read over them and then do the vague "maybe you could change this introduction a little" or "are you sure you have enough context in this essay?" OP is lucky they got one draft really
    Yeah, mine do exactly the same. It's quite frustrating knowing you've done something wrong but not knowing what to do about it, but I understand their reasoning.
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    Sounds like you have pretty lazy, uncommitted teachers.
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    During my A Levels in some of my subjects including English, they were not able to mark drafts or anything... we literally had to give it in first time and it was marked and that was the mark you got. It does prepare you for university though where you get no second chances either to change the coursework!
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    Tell me about it!
    My teacher has marked my work but refuses to tell me what grade it is, because apparently 'the grade boundaries can change', and she cannot give me even a vague indication 'because it's really hard to tell...'. I NEED AN A*.
    She also took her time to mark it, going on and on about how she's got like 7463637282872 courseworks to mark etc, well, hello, it's your job.
    If I don't get into uni i'm going to blame her!
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    (Original post by A level Az)
    I came here to vent my anger really, and advice is always nice because people come up with some pretty good ideas a lot of the time.

    And as for your second point, that is what drafts are for. I don't understand what you mean. We have to hand in all our drafts alongside our final piece just to prove that we have built on it and improved it...

    Edit - People who care about their academics should be helped surely? There are still many people I know who just don't care and procrastinate and they will fail no doubt, so when you imply that people who care shouldn't get 100%, then I'm afraid I don't agree. People who make the effort should attain better grades, whether that is a C, a B, an A or an A*. And that doesn't mean they need to get their coursework

    marked 20 times a week; just a few drafts before the final one.
    I disagree, no one 'deserves' good grades, if a stupid person tries really hard and cares about their work, should they get an A because they..tried? And similarly if someone can get an A without doing much work at all and not really bothering, should they be given a D instead because they didn't try?
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    plus this thread pretty much sums up why coursework is such bull****.
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    (Original post by A level Az)
    Sat us all down on Thursday - Basically told us that each coursework folder took an hour to mark, which took up too much of their time if they had to mark lots of drafts. Baring in mind we've only had one draft marked (which was probably a month ago now), I assumed that 3-4 drafts would be reasonable, but no, we've got one shot left now; next time they mark it will be the final one
    Your teachers' agreement to mark one draft and no more is very reasonable in my opinion. As others have said, you are lucky even to have got an inkling of what your grade would be; I have never heard of another school who has a policy like that. Asking your teachers to mark even one more, let alone 3 to 4 drafts, veers very closely towards making a mockery of the coursework - it is supposed to be YOUR work after all. To let you go back over and over again and change things and improve things that you wouldn't have noticed YOURSELF is to let you hand something in which isn't truly YOUR work.

    In any case, this is a better practice for university, where you get one stab at the coursework, hand it in and that's it: that's your final piece. It won't be as scary to you if you've had only minimal feedback on your coursework essays at A-level.
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    (Original post by derp)
    Your teachers' agreement to mark one draft and no more is very reasonable in my opinion. As others have said, you are lucky even to have got an inkling of what your grade would be; I have never heard of another school who has a policy like that. Asking your teachers to mark even one more, let alone 3 to 4 drafts, veers very closely towards making a mockery of the coursework - it is supposed to be YOUR work after all. To let you go back over and over again and change things and improve things that you wouldn't have noticed YOURSELF is to let you hand something in which isn't truly YOUR work.

    In any case, this is a better practice for university, where you get one stab at the coursework, hand it in and that's it: that's your final piece. It won't be as scary to you if you've had only minimal feedback on your coursework essays at A-level.
    Well it really must depend on what school you go to then; my school would give you 3-4 drafts and if you did more I can't imagine any of my teachers ever saying they wouldn't mark something! After all, they want you to do as well as you can, and you can be damn sure that at some schools teachers are doing more than just marking efficiently...that's my issue with coursework, and practical assesments in school come to that, the system really is just so very corrupt! My school in most subjects goes as close to the rules as it possibly can, giving us hints on questions in practicals, and doing another, 'coincidentally similar' practical before we do it. On the other hand, I know of schools where teachers let students look at their practical papers in advance...so really, I think your school is giving you an unfair disadvantage against other students whom you are competing against as if they do not go as close to the rules as possible! After all, if yours don't, others will, and I would stress that I am only talking about what is within the rules here - schools are ALLOWED to mark and give feedback on coursework at A level, so if they DON'T, then it is disadvantaging you against countless other students who will have had better preparation/feedback. It's not cheating, though it certainly is playing the system. The problem is if you don't, then it's a disadvantage to yourself.
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    (Original post by Vinchenko)
    Well it really must depend on what school you go to then; my school would give you 3-4 drafts and if you did more I can't imagine any of my teachers ever saying they wouldn't mark something! After all, they want you to do as well as you can, and you can be damn sure that at some schools teachers are doing more than just marking efficiently...that's my issue with coursework, and practical assesments in school come to that, the system really is just so very corrupt! My school in most subjects goes as close to the rules as it possibly can, giving us hints on questions in practicals, and doing another, 'coincidentally similar' practical before we do it. On the other hand, I know of schools where teachers let students look at their practical papers in advance...so really, I think your school is giving you an unfair disadvantage against other students whom you are competing against as if they do not go as close to the rules as possible! After all, if yours don't, others will, and I would stress that I am only talking about what is within the rules here - schools are ALLOWED to mark and give feedback on coursework at A level, so if they DON'T, then it is disadvantaging you against countless other students who will have had better preparation/feedback. It's not cheating, though it certainly is playing the system. The problem is if you don't, then it's a disadvantage to yourself.
    Hmm... the rules that govern exam boards are pretty strict (JCQ regulations) and if what you said happens was reported to them your teachers might be out of a job. For coursework, the JCQ rules are clear - one draft and no specific guidance for corrections or detailed feedback on how to improve, only general guidance.

    Of course teachers want to help their students but if they're cheating (which is what they're doing, not "going as close to the rules as possible" but hurdling the line, dropping their trousers and mooning at the rules) someone else is suffering.

    OK, you may do well out of it (while your teacher has another nervous breakdown having to mark another 80 drafts of 2000 word essays because their HoD tells them that's the only way they're going to up their ALIS or A*-B profile), but another school down the road won't and I think that's totally wrong.

    I think - as a teacher - that coursework is really important because it's one of the few occasions in the current system when students can work on something sustained on their own, and it's the closest to the approach used at uni that you're going to get, on the whole.

    We wouldn't be in this situation if league tables were scrapped!
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    (Original post by merkatron)
    Hmm... the rules that govern exam boards are pretty strict (JCQ regulations) and if what you said happens was reported to them your teachers might be out of a job. For coursework, the JCQ rules are clear - one draft and no specific guidance for corrections or detailed feedback on how to improve, only general guidance.

    Of course teachers want to help their students but if they're cheating (which is what they're doing, not "going as close to the rules as possible" but hurdling the line, dropping their trousers and mooning at the rules) someone else is suffering.

    OK, you may do well out of it (while your teacher has another nervous breakdown having to mark another 80 drafts of 2000 word essays because their HoD tells them that's the only way they're going to up their ALIS or A*-B profile), but another school down the road won't and I think that's totally wrong.

    I think - as a teacher - that coursework is really important because it's one of the few occasions in the current system when students can work on something sustained on their own, and it's the closest to the approach used at uni that you're going to get, on the whole.

    We wouldn't be in this situation if league tables were scrapped!
    Well, obviously I'm a student not a teacher so I don't read the JCQ regulations back to back, so I may have to defer to you on that one! There is of course a balance to be struck between teachers being apathetic and not bothering to mark work properly, and to them marking as fully as is allowed within the rules of the system - though I have to say, if those are the rules, I can name MANY schools where they are not followed to the letter! So then, of course, we're back into the vicious cycle of if one school gets away with it, others have to to catch up...

    Well the uni issue depends very much on what university you're going to! I will be going to Cambridge next year, where all assesment is on 3hr unseen exams and the occaisonal spoken 'viva', and the termtime work is essays for supervisors, twice weekly - which is most akin to doing regular homework essays, as I do for geography, and then taking a big exam at the end of the year, and not at all like coursework which you can spend weeks crafting.

    I am wholly against the scrapping of league tables for a whole variety of reasons, but my favourite is simply look at Wales - since league tables were scrapped there, unlike in England where GCSE grades have continued their inexorable climb, GCSE grades have slipped to the point where a welsh student is now 2 whole grades behind an English one on average - and that just in a few years. Removing league tables removes the incentives for heads and hence teachers to do well and look good by improving their scores publicly. I think it is unrealistic to say that without outside recognition or even being able to say what their overall GCSE results were, that ALL teachers will be motivated enough to go that extra mile, and that is the effect that we have seen in Wales. Simple economics tells you that competition drives up standards, and that you cannot have competition without openness. League tables make schools accountable to parents, government and the general public. Yes, judging schools solely on the basis of GCSE or A2 grades is a little unfair as it depends on the school's intake and so on, but that's what CVA scores are for, and GCSE grades by money spent - I would argue that it's not that league tables themselves are bad, but what you put in them that is!
 
 
 
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