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    I was just thinking about -ve feedback that keep blood glucose normal,

    When blood glucose conc. is too high > cells take more glucose
    Do they only take it to respire?!
    :rolleyes:
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    When blood glucose is too high insulin converts it to glycogen (a storage molecule).
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    When blood glucose is too high insulin converts it to glycogen (a storage molecule).

    Thanks for reply

    Yeh and its called gylcongenesis but there are 2 other ways to lower the B Glucose
    1. Cells respire more
    2. Cells take up more

    well, these all work together

    I just didnt understand the 2nd one!!
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    (Original post by arvin_infinity)
    Thanks for reply

    Yeh and its called gylcongenesis but there are 2 other ways to lower the B Glucose
    1. Cells respire more
    [COLOR="Red"]2.[/COLOR] Cells take up more

    well, these all work together

    I just didnt understand the 2nd one!!
    It's taken up and converted to glycogen, mainly by liver and muscle cells.
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    (Original post by Revd. Mike)
    It's taken up and converted to glycogen, mainly by liver and muscle cells.
    Makes more sense now,

    Here is another one: :rolleyes:
    Why CGP says glycogen only binds to receptor on liver and cells not muscles as well?!
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    Also in responce to the OP there are many potential fates of glucose that is taken up in responce to insulin. glycogen is on and can occur in many tissues of the body. As has already been stated this is particularly significant in liver and muscle (noting muscle glycogen > liver glycogen) which are big glucose sinks. increased cellular glucose in combination with the activation of the insulin receptor also primes and promotes various other cellular anabolic processes other than glycogen synthesis such as the pentose phosphate pathway. insulin signalling promotes growth through transcriptional regulation and glucose is required to provide the energy for this hence increased catabolism as well.

    (Original post by arvin_infinity)
    Makes more sense now,

    Here is another one: :rolleyes:
    Why CGP says glycogen only binds to receptor on liver and cells not muscles as well?!
    do you mean glucagon?
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    (Original post by John Locke)
    Also in responce to the OP there are many potential fates of glucose that is taken up in responce to insulin. glycogen is on and can occur in many tissues of the body. As has already been stated this is particularly significant in liver and muscle (noting muscle glycogen > liver glycogen) which are big glucose sinks. increased cellular glucose in combination with the activation of the insulin receptor also primes and promotes various other cellular anabolic processes other than glycogen synthesis such as the pentose phosphate pathway. insulin signalling promotes growth through transcriptional regulation and glucose is required to provide the energy for this hence increased catabolism as well.



    do you mean glucagon?
    oh sorry! yes glucagon
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    (Original post by arvin_infinity)
    oh sorry! yes glucagon
    what are you particularly struggling with about glucagon?

    glucagon acts via a receptor that is predominatly located in liver cells (hepatocytes) and works via the same signalling pathways as sympathetic innervation (primarily NA) and circulating adrenaline (via 7TM GPCRs primarily associated with G_\alpha stimulatory subtypes if interested). together these act to supress glycolysis, glycogen synthesis, triglyceride and fatty acid synthesis etc etc and to stimulate glycogenolysis (generally lower concentrations), ketone body synthesis etc and, most importantly perhaps, gluconeogenesis (production of glucose from pyruvate). the liver is charged with primary glucose regulation of the body, performing around 70% of total gluconeogenesis (other ~30% is the renal medulla, although?other tissues in different scenarios). the alpha cells of the pancrease are charged with detecting plasma glucose falling below normal and secrete glucagon in responce with the aim of bringing it back up to normal levels. with this function in mind, does it make sense to have it act on other body tissues? thats not to say there aren't receptors elsewhere but they're probably nowhere near as significant physiologically as the liver's ones.does this make sense?
 
 
 
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