Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TheHyacinthGirl)
    Is the bullying situation in boarding schools better than in state secondary schools?

    I went to a state school, it was awful. If I ever have children I really hope I can afford to pay for their education.
    It's different. From my experience there's less extreme physical bullying (though it does still happen) but the psychological/social stuff is still horrific and can be even worse because you are there all. the. time. and cannot get away. I remember when one girl fell out with the other three in her dorm, and in the process pretty much split the girls in our year in half for several weeks. Even though she was living with them, nobody would speak to her and she became very very depressed. There was just nowhere for her to go where she wouldn't be reminded of what had happened. Eating disorders and self-harm are very common especially among girls at boarding school. I probably would have been bullied wherever I went, because at 11-13 my personality was just one that was easy to pick on, but it might have been for slightly different reasons if I'd been at a state school. I was on a government-assisted place (these no longer exist) and a scholarship, so most of the kids took great pleasure in telling me how I shouldn't be there and how their parents taxes were paying for my education which I clearly didn't deserve.

    There's also more "institutional" bullying than at other places, I think - if one of the prefect takes a dislike to you, they can make your life completely miserable. Although it was officially banned, my school, and I'm sure many others, had some kind of "fagging" system (though at mine they were called "pickers") - basically younger pupils having to do a variety of menial chores for older ones or face some kind of punishments/humiliation.

    I doubt very much I would send my children to boarding school, but I would definitely consider private education depending on a)my budget and b)what state schools in the area were like.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I went to a boarding school.
    The school itself was (and is) good, however many of the people there with me were ********s.

    But that's life. I might have preferred to gone to one school, a day school where I was able to go home every day but I didn't.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ForensicShoe)
    I go to a state school and work at a private school.
    It's sometimes a bit weird hearing 'Oh yes, Mummy will be dining with the [insert title here] of [insert town here] tonight' but I've gotten used to it. If my parents had had a bit more £ I could well have been a privately educated student anyway.
    yeah but the thing with boarding schools, well mine in particular, is that only select people speak like that or act like that.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Helenia)
    I was on a government-assisted place (these no longer exist) and a scholarship, so most of the kids took great pleasure in telling me how I shouldn't be there and how their parents taxes were paying for my education which I clearly didn't deserve.
    that's awful. the scholars in my school are envied because of the intellect. all of them are so so smart
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    It baffles me why some selfish people have kids then can't wait to get them off their hands to boarding school.
    I'm amazed it doesn't scar every pupil that goes. Mind you many of those who do go are scarred!
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Callum)
    that's awful. the scholars in my school are envied because of the intellect. all of them are so so smart
    Lol, I wish. Just made me stick out more. But that would have been the case at any school - nobody likes a smartarse at that age, just wouldn't have had the scholarship issue on top at a state school.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Sorry to hear your experiences, I actually really enjoyed my year in boarding school
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hypocriticaljap)
    It baffles me why some selfish people have kids then can't wait to get them off their hands to boarding school.
    I'm amazed it doesn't scar every pupil that goes. Mind you many of those who do go are scarred!
    again, it's often not a choice. my parents want me back and most of my friends do. we get a better education as boarders
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hypocriticaljap)
    It baffles me why some selfish people have kids then can't wait to get them off their hands to boarding school.
    I'm amazed it doesn't scar every pupil that goes. Mind you many of those who do go are scarred!
    Some don't do it totally out of choice. My boyfriend was packed off to boarding school at the age of 8 because he was too much for his mother to handle while his dad was away at sea. It was always intended to send him to Winchester at 13, but never off to boarding school at the age of 8.

    It was the making of him, after a year he was a different child because he was being intellectually and physically challenged because of all the activities the school ran, something which a local day private school couldn't provide for him.

    She couldn't wait to off load him because she had her hands full with his younger sister as well, ultimately she had two kids to think about.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Callum)
    yeah but the thing with boarding schools, well mine in particular, is that only select people speak like that or act like that.
    It selects people with money surely and those who get places with scholarships, etc.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ForensicShoe)
    It selects people with money surely and those who get places with scholarships, etc.
    25% of the student body are on a bursary
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Helenia)
    It's different. From my experience there's less extreme physical bullying (though it does still happen) but the psychological/social stuff is still horrific and can be even worse because you are there all. the. time. and cannot get away. I remember when one girl fell out with the other three in her dorm, and in the process pretty much split the girls in our year in half for several weeks. Even though she was living with them, nobody would speak to her and she became very very depressed. There was just nowhere for her to go where she wouldn't be reminded of what had happened. Eating disorders and self-harm are very common especially among girls at boarding school. I probably would have been bullied wherever I went, because at 11-13 my personality was just one that was easy to pick on, but it might have been for slightly different reasons if I'd been at a state school. I was on a government-assisted place (these no longer exist) and a scholarship, so most of the kids took great pleasure in telling me how I shouldn't be there and how their parents taxes were paying for my education which I clearly didn't deserve.

    There's also more "institutional" bullying than at other places, I think - if one of the prefect takes a dislike to you, they can make your life completely miserable. Although it was officially banned, my school, and I'm sure many others, had some kind of "fagging" system (though at mine they were called "pickers") - basically younger pupils having to do a variety of menial chores for older ones or face some kind of punishments/humiliation.

    I doubt very much I would send my children to boarding school, but I would definitely consider private education depending on a)my budget and b)what state schools in the area were like.
    Wow, thanks for that insight. I definately wouldn't want my kids to go to boarding school, but a private school does seem inviting. The school I went to is in a deprived area and classes were constantly disrupted because many people had never been brought up to value education, and I think that's probably one thing you can escape from with public school. Very sad though that bullying seems to be universal.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    It really depends on the school and its "ethos" (as weird as it seems to actually use that concept). I go to a relatively small boarding school (and went to an even smaller prep) and I've had no terrible experiences.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I'm starting at an international state boarding school in September and it wasn't my mum's choice, it was mine. I think that if it's your own personal choice and you are old enough to be away from family (ideally from say 16 up) then that makes all the difference. I would also try and get my kids into private school if I had the money, however much people go on about how education should be fair at all ends of the spectrum, and yes it should be, I doubt very much that that is a realistic notion :/, private schools are always going to have the upper hand.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Board! If all your friends are around you, you can get up to all sorts of fun without having to be out of school.

    You can study in the library!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey everyone,
    I have a question - A teacher told me that to be accepted into med school, I would need AT LEAST a B s every subject. I think that I'd be able to do that as I'm predicted As and Bs in all my subjects - EXCEPT French!!

    I REEEAAALLLLY want to make it as a doctor and I don't know what I would do if i failed at it.
    What should I do?:confused:
    should I drop French now and spend more time on my other subjects or should I carry on with it and risk getting C?

    P.S.
    Is it even true? would i not be rejected EVERYWHERE if I had a C in French?

    S
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you rather give up salt or pepper?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.