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    (Original post by RodrigoB)
    how do we work out number of moles ?
    That the first thing thats made me LOL today.

    Cant Pos rep.
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    Is it true that tetrahedral molecules do not show stereoisomerism?

    We use cis-platin. why not trans?
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    (Original post by RodrigoB)
    how do we work out number of moles ?
    Lol.
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    (Original post by ViralRiver)
    In cell potentials, why does the E potential increase for a copper half cell if you increase conc. of the Cu2+ ions? I know eqm shifts to the right due to le chatelier's principle, but why does the E potential increase? Electrons are being removed from the system right?
    This Cu is less easily oxidised (hence reducing power decreases while its oxidation power increases) so E pt. must increases ( more positive/ less negative) for better oxidising agents.
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    do we ave to knw the redox equlibria equations?
    mn + fe, i+cu, i+s2o3, mn+h2o2
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    (Original post by jlcf)
    Is it true that tetrahedral molecules do not show stereoisomerism?

    We use cis-platin. why not trans?
    Platin is square planar, hence shows cis/trans.
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    (Original post by jlcf)
    Is it true that tetrahedral molecules do not show stereoisomerism?

    We use cis-platin. why not trans?
    tetrahedral do show stereoisomerism if they have two different types of ligands bonded.
    If the ligands are 90degrees away from each other, that's trans and if the ligands are adjacent thats cis.
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    (Original post by jlcf)
    Is it true that tetrahedral molecules do not show stereoisomerism?

    We use cis-platin. why not trans?
    You just have to say trans-platin is inactive i think, don't need to go further then that
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    (Original post by mandn)
    You just have to say trans-platin is inactive i think, don't need to go further then that
    Is it something to do with neg side effects?
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    (Original post by jlcf)
    Is it true that tetrahedral molecules do not show stereoisomerism?

    We use cis-platin. why not trans?
    They show optical isomerism.
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    HAHAHA I saw someone asking how to work out concentration on this thread. I was like WTF ?
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    (Original post by jlcf)
    Is it true that tetrahedral molecules do not show stereoisomerism?

    We use cis-platin. why not trans?
    Tetrahedral molecules show optical isomerism. Umm I'm guessing we don't use trans-platin bec it behaves differently?
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    (Original post by apo1324)
    Tetrahedral molecules show optical isomerism. Umm I'm guessing we don't use trans-platin bec it behaves differently?
    Trans platin does not bind to the DNA as effectively as cis.
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    Anyone know why platin is a neutral complex (jan 2011 paper)?
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    (Original post by Student21)
    Anyone know why platin is a neutral complex (jan 2011 paper)?
    Pt is 2+, Cl is -1 there are 2 of them, NH3 is neutral.
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    (Original post by Faisal-Fm)
    You notice the electrode potentials?
    Rule is that the Less Positive Terminal has been Oxidised, Oxidise is Loss of electrons, thus it goes the opposite way, but the top one is actually meant to be -0.83 not 0.4v, you mixed them around am I guessing...

    The Half Cell cuts down to this:

    H2+2OH--->2H2O + 2E- (Oxidised Equation)
    1/2 O2 + H2O + 2E ---> 2OH- (Reduced Equation)

    Balacing out, Cancelling and Overall equation:
    H2+1/2 O2 --> H20.

    Moar?

    Thats itt..
    Dunno why the equation in the textbook its not balanced!
    its 2H20 in the second one!
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    (Original post by Student21)
    Anyone know why platin is a neutral complex (jan 2011 paper)?
    Platimun is inert, not reactive at all
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    (Original post by KnuckleheadNinja)
    Question 1A iii on the specimen paper

    can someone tell me WHY they've divided 1x10-12 by 4?

    pretty please
    Look at the ratio of oxygens formed on the right hand side of the equation. They're in 2:1/2 right? so you divide it by 2 to get 1:1/4

    This is where the 4 comes from, so you divide the initial rate by 4
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    (Original post by Student21)
    Anyone know why platin is a neutral complex (jan 2011 paper)?
    I think Pt has a 2+ charge, then each Cl ligand has a 1- charge, the NH3 ligands have no charge. So the Pt2+ and 2CL- cancel out.
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    (Original post by Wilzyy)
    I think Pt has a 2+ charge, then each Cl ligand has a 1- charge, the NH3 ligands have no charge. So the Pt2+ and 2CL- cancel out.
    Does NH3 never have a charge?
 
 
 
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