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    yep, i'm planning on giving blood in January (after my resits) i'm kinda scared about it...but i'm going with a friend, to hold my hand .LOL


    Would i need to eat something before i go to the session?

    and... i think it would be best for me to take the bus on the way home aswell, LOL because its all 10min uphill walk from the centre


    and...does the blood you donate get replaced by the body?
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    (Original post by shoiab)
    yep, i'm planning on giving blood in January (after my resits) i'm kinda scared about it...but i'm going with a friend, to hold my hand .LOL
    Would i need to eat something before i go to the session?
    and... i think it would be best for me to take the bus on the way home aswell, LOL because its all 10min uphill walk from the centre
    and...does the blood you donate get replaced by the body?
    Mate, there's really nothing to fret. Blood gets replaced by the body instantly.

    I give buckets of bloods each day. I walk home, infact run it.

    I recommend it.
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    I wish I could. I faint at the sight of a needle. I was out of 3 minutes last time. I know rationally there is nothing to fear.
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    (Original post by -nikki-)
    I'm scared... hate blood and needles...
    Just a few questions...

    1. I'm about 7st 10 (it says on the website you need to be 7st 12), how closely do they stick to this? I figured it shouldn't really matter if it's a couple of pounds, and if I wear something heavy i might even be ok :rolleyes:
    2. I'm vegetarian... could I be anaemic and therefore not able to give blood?
    3. How much does it hurt? What does it feel like?

    Sorry for all the questions, just nervous.
    I haven't fully read these replies but Il'l reply to this. I have given blood 3 times. You go in and you have to fill a form out with your details the first time or give them a card( you've been before) and now th EU requires you to read a leaflet and ackowledge you have read it.

    You will be called to a little cubicle thing wherever you do it and fill out a form about your health, lifestyle and travel. A nurse will grill you on this information again and discuss anything you are unsure of. The iron test thing with the blue and green coloured fluids checks you atre able to give blood which is ok. You will then be given a sheet of paper which you take over to the other nurses and then after a brief time they will take you to a bed and you will lie down. At this stage they may ask for your birth date and name a few times.

    Normally you will be asked if you would like a general aneasthetic, but if you want one make that clear as soon as the doctor comes over. They will build pressure with a pump on your arm. The needle is put into your arm at the inside of the elbow joint and then the nurse will play about with the tube coming from it and the blood will start to flow. You may be given a tissue to squeeze and release as to help circulation. The first two times you will not be giving a full donation but slightly less as they want to see you can cope with the blood loss.

    When your donation is over they will take out the needle and let you read a small leaflet on what to do after you leave the bed. You will be allowed to go after this and sit down to drink some juice coffee or tea and scoff down some good old bikkies. After ten minutes you should just get up and go.

    As a rule of thumb I eat packets of raisins before and after I give blood as they are high in iron which I reckon helps in an immediate recovery.

    1. Don't give blood until you are the proper weight as your first donation is the important one where they need your blood group and tests. It is somewhat pointless to go if you are in any form of ill health.

    2. Of course you could be aneamic but you don't really know. They will tell by the blue green liquid tests. If you aren't allowed to go any further perhaps a visit to the GP is in order.

    3. It only hurts when the needle goes in but it's only as much as like when you touch a hot irno and you get a quick burn pain-it's very little.
    A weird feeling comes from when they take the pressure off and your blood rushes back in to your arm. It's cool and by the third donation it's not really recognisable.

    Hope that covers a good bit of information.
    DaibhidhXX
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    thx alot for all the advice
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    (Original post by LauraWalker)
    I wish I could. I faint at the sight of a needle. I was out of 3 minutes last time. I know rationally there is nothing to fear.
    just dont look at the needles then? literally just ask the nurses to tell you when theyre doing the needle stuff and look away/close your eyes?
 
 
 
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