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    I have offers for the GDL at CoL (Bloomsbury), BPP (Waterloo), Edinburgh Uni and Glasgow Uni. City University said no. I'm 29 and I have a bad undergrad degree; it's a general degree, no honours no named subject (I was young). However, since then I have got a Masters degree in International Relations and a Research Masters in Political Theory. I wrote dissertation on the C17th international lawyer Hugo Grotius on his jurisprudence and international law theory.
    Inbetween the 1st and 2nd degrees I worked as a tour manager for a comedy/theatre production company. I also worked at Radio 4 for a while. I'm currently teaching English in Korea, my contract lasts until March 2012.

    If I take up a GDL place I will break my contract and lose the small bonus I get if I fulfill it. However, I'm aware time is pressing, I'm already 29 and so I'm eager to start as soon as possible. However I have minimal savings (about 5k come Sept '11) and so will be relying on a Natwest loan (presuming I get one) to pay for the fees and the year in London. I don't have a TC or any expereince of working with a firm. Edinburgh and Glasgow are 2 year courses and are two expensive as a result.

    In terms of a law career I would want to work for the government legal service or an IO such as the UN. I think I would get high grades in the GDL and I can't wait to begin it but I suppose I don't seem like a template candidate for a potential employer, not by any means.
    I'd like some advice from those in the know please. Should I begin in Sept 2011 and do I have a chance of getting a TC for doing an LPC the following year?
    Thanks in advance.
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    (Original post by Saxaphone Joe)
    I have offers for the GDL at CoL (Bloomsbury), BPP (Waterloo), Edinburgh Uni and Glasgow Uni. City University said no. I'm 29 and I have a bad undergrad degree; it's a general degree, no honours no named subject (I was young). However, since then I have got a Masters degree in International Relations and a Research Masters in Political Theory. I wrote dissertation on the C17th international lawyer Hugo Grotius on his jurisprudence and international law theory.
    Inbetween the 1st and 2nd degrees I worked as a tour manager for a comedy/theatre production company. I also worked at Radio 4 for a while. I'm currently teaching English in Korea, my contract lasts until March 2012.

    If I take up a GDL place I will break my contract and lose the small bonus I get if I fulfill it. However, I'm aware time is pressing, I'm already 29 and so I'm eager to start as soon as possible. However I have minimal savings (about 5k come Sept '11) and so will be relying on a Natwest loan (presuming I get one) to pay for the fees and the year in London. I don't have a TC or any expereince of working with a firm. Edinburgh and Glasgow are 2 year courses and are two expensive as a result.

    In terms of a law career I would want to work for the government legal service or an IO such as the UN. I think I would get high grades in the GDL and I can't wait to begin it but I suppose I don't seem like a template candidate for a potential employer, not by any means.
    I'd like some advice from those in the know please. Should I begin in Sept 2011 and do I have a chance of getting a TC for doing an LPC the following year?
    Thanks in advance.
    Do the Edinburgh and Glasgow degrees allow you to practice in England and Wales?

    A lot of the evidence would suggest that with an unclassified degree you have no chance to get a TC. Being mature is not enough to set you apart in the way many mature candidates hope their life experience sets them apart - you will be competing with mature candidates who have this AND Oxbridge fists. You would therefore be better, if you are really determined to do this, doing a part time law degree at birkbeck etc while working full time to fund it and get experience. You say you think you would do well on the GDL but why? Loads and loads and loads of people do little work and spend uni "being young" and still get 2.1s. Its always easier to predict a top grade than get one.

    GLS will not accept you without a 2.1 - you won't even be able to fill in the form as the first question is "do you have a 2.1 honours degree" and if not you are immediately locked out. I image the UN is fiercely competative.
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    (Original post by Saxaphone Joe)
    I have offers for the GDL at CoL (Bloomsbury), BPP (Waterloo), Edinburgh Uni and Glasgow Uni. City University said no. I'm 29 and I have a bad undergrad degree; it's a general degree, no honours no named subject (I was young). However, since then I have got a Masters degree in International Relations and a Research Masters in Political Theory. I wrote dissertation on the C17th international lawyer Hugo Grotius on his jurisprudence and international law theory.
    Inbetween the 1st and 2nd degrees I worked as a tour manager for a comedy/theatre production company. I also worked at Radio 4 for a while. I'm currently teaching English in Korea, my contract lasts until March 2012.

    If I take up a GDL place I will break my contract and lose the small bonus I get if I fulfill it. However, I'm aware time is pressing, I'm already 29 and so I'm eager to start as soon as possible. However I have minimal savings (about 5k come Sept '11) and so will be relying on a Natwest loan (presuming I get one) to pay for the fees and the year in London. I don't have a TC or any expereince of working with a firm. Edinburgh and Glasgow are 2 year courses and are two expensive as a result.

    In terms of a law career I would want to work for the government legal service or an IO such as the UN. I think I would get high grades in the GDL and I can't wait to begin it but I suppose I don't seem like a template candidate for a potential employer, not by any means.
    I'd like some advice from those in the know please. Should I begin in Sept 2011 and do I have a chance of getting a TC for doing an LPC the following year?
    Thanks in advance.
    best of luckk!
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    (Original post by FMQ)
    Do the Edinburgh and Glasgow degrees allow you to practice in England and Wales?
    No, they don't.
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    (Original post by Saxaphone Joe)
    I'd like some advice from those in the know please. Should I begin in Sept 2011 and do I have a chance of getting a TC for doing an LPC the following year?
    Thanks in advance.
    I am afraid FMQ is being realistic.

    Although he suggests Birkbeck, there are plenty of other places offering part-time law degrees in cheaper parts of the country. Alternatively you could try maximising your income for a year and doing a two year senior status law degree.

    A 2:1 in law from anywhere decent turns you from an exceptionally weak candidate to a strong one given the two masters.
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    you will be competing with mature candidates who have this AND Oxbridge fists
    Sorry but in what must be quite a depressing thread this made me LOL. I'd take money on anyone in a bare knuckle fight against an Oxbridge grad.
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    (Original post by peachmelba)
    Sorry but in what must be quite a depressing thread this made me LOL. I'd take money on anyone in a bare knuckle fight against an Oxbridge grad.
    I wouldn't fancy my chances against this lot: http://www.cuabc.org.uk/index.php/about/profiles/
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    I wouldn't fancy my chances against this lot: http://www.cuabc.org.uk/index.php/about/profiles/
    Ha bunch of sissies. Only the yank looks vaguely scary. Have you seen the light welterweight? And they wear gloves
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    (Original post by peachmelba)
    Sorry but in what must be quite a depressing thread this made me LOL. I'd take money on anyone in a bare knuckle fight against an Oxbridge grad.
    Ah ...reps for you! What a fist I AM.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    I am afraid FMQ is being realistic.

    Although he suggests Birkbeck, there are plenty of other places offering part-time law degrees in cheaper parts of the country. Alternatively you could try maximising your income for a year and doing a two year senior status law degree.

    A 2:1 in law from anywhere decent turns you from an exceptionally weak candidate to a strong one given the two masters.

    What about the LLB you are awarded if you do the GDL and LPC at the one institution. Is it not the case that you are awarded an LLB by CoL if you complete some extra units; and I think this takes an additional 3 months? Presumably that degree would be classified. If that's the case I would then just need to worry about funding the LPC - which I could do by teaching for a year after the GDL. Or possibly by getting a TC (although as you say would be is unlikely - but I would have thought my Masters would count for something here)

    It may be possible and much more affordable to do the GDL somewhere cheap, e.g. at Plymouth, which costs £3600 roughly, and the LPC there too (if they offer it). However, I don't know if they award an LLB in the same way as CoL can. I'll need to take a look.

    Thanks for your comments.
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    (Original post by Saxaphone Joe)
    What about the LLB you are awarded if you do the GDL and LPC at the one institution. Is it not the case that you are awarded an LLB by CoL if you complete some extra units; and I think this takes an additional 3 months? Presumably that degree would be classified. If that's the case I would then just need to worry about funding the LPC - which I could do by teaching for a year after the GDL. Or possibly by getting a TC (although as you say would be is unlikely - but I would have thought my Masters would count for something here)

    It may be possible and much more affordable to do the GDL somewhere cheap, e.g. at Plymouth, which costs £3600 roughly, and the LPC there too (if they offer it). However, I don't know if they award an LLB in the same way as CoL can. I'll need to take a look.

    Thanks for your comments.
    I think everyone in the legal profession is wised up to the "free" LLBs and LLMs given out with GDL and LPC courses. They are not qualifying law degrees.

    The purpose behind these qualifications is to give people who don't end up in the legal profession, a qualification that is recognisably transferable. Otherwise to say you have done the Common Professional Examination or have a Graduate Diploma in Law might appear to an engineering company like you have an HND.
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    The COL "LLB" does not count in the profession, despite LOADS of scholars with 2.2s thinking it does - its just a marketing ploy by COL to secure students. It is as NT says above - its only benefit is for transfer purpose. I did the BVC LLM purely for this purpose so that if I didn't end up as a lawyer of one kind or the other I would at least not have wasted time with an unrecognisable qualification but i would at least have a recognisable degree - didn't make a difference in law apps.
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    (Original post by Saxaphone Joe)
    What about the LLB you are awarded if you do the GDL and LPC at the one institution. Is it not the case that you are awarded an LLB by CoL if you complete some extra units; and I think this takes an additional 3 months? Presumably that degree would be classified. If that's the case I would then just need to worry about funding the LPC - which I could do by teaching for a year after the GDL. Or possibly by getting a TC (although as you say would be is unlikely - but I would have thought my Masters would count for something here)

    It may be possible and much more affordable to do the GDL somewhere cheap, e.g. at Plymouth, which costs £3600 roughly, and the LPC there too (if they offer it). However, I don't know if they award an LLB in the same way as CoL can. I'll need to take a look.

    Thanks for your comments.
    Still wouldn't get you in to the GLS. The GLS look at result in the first degree undertaken. No amount of masters, top up degrees or even PhDs will alter that.
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    (Original post by Ethereal)
    Still wouldn't get you in to the GLS. The GLS look at result in the first degree undertaken. No amount of masters, top up degrees or even PhDs will alter that.
    Ach, things are going from bad to worse. It seems without a 2.1 i'm goosed. And even if I do an undergrad law degree I'm still goosed as my bad degree would be considered before this. What about Plan C: doing the 2 year accelerated law degree in Scotland and aiming for the Scottish GLS http://www.scotland.gov.uk/About/Dir.../glss/Trainees

    The Acc Degree in Scotland would give me a real undergrad law degree. If I had to I could go to Stirling Uni which is probably the cheapest. After the first year I could apply for the GLS for Scotland with the 1st year of the Acc Degree's grades behind me.
    Any glimer of optimism with this option? By the way I appreciate your honest responses so faras I don't want to be misguided or naive going into this.
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    What about plan C: the accelerated LLB in scotland with a view to the GLS for Scotland. The acc llb would give me an undergrad qualification and I would be able to apply for a tc after the first year with my grades for that year behind me. I would also gain some experience on a placement in a firm on this course.
    Would this make me a more plausible candidate? And doing it at a Uni like Stirling may be a cheaper way to do it. A chance for optimism?

    Thanks for the honest responses; the last thing I want is to go into this with niave misconceptions. Saying that though, my ambitions are currently caving in on themselves. It would be nice, as this discussion draws to a close, if you could offer a final piece of advice. What would you do in my situation?
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    (Original post by Saxaphone Joe)
    What about plan C: the accelerated LLB in scotland with a view to the GLS for Scotland. The acc llb would give me an undergrad qualification and I would be able to apply for a tc after the first year with my grades for that year behind me. I would also gain some experience on a placement in a firm on this course.
    Would this make me a more plausible candidate? And doing it at a Uni like Stirling may be a cheaper way to do it. A chance for optimism?

    Thanks for the honest responses; the last thing I want is to go into this with niave misconceptions. Saying that though, my ambitions are currently caving in on themselves. It would be nice, as this discussion draws to a close, if you could offer a final piece of advice. What would you do in my situation?
    I presume the reason for doing the accelerated LLB in Scotland rather than England is purely financial?

    If you study at Stirling you will be doing Scots law. I don't know what the prospects are for training contracts in Scotland at present.

    If you want to do a two year accelerated LLB in English law in Scotland, then AFAIK Dundee is the only place.
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    (Original post by Ethereal)
    Still wouldn't get you in to the GLS. The GLS look at result in the first degree undertaken. No amount of masters, top up degrees or even PhDs will alter that.
    This is not correct if he had a proper 2.1 that would be fine for the application of the GLS the question is do you have a 2.1 hons not do you have a 2.1 hons as the first degree you did - I was at bar school with someone in this position who got to interview stage - but it would have to be a whole degree not the COL one.
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    (Original post by FMQ)
    This is not correct if he had a proper 2.1 that would be fine for the application of the GLS the question is do you have a 2.1 hons not do you have a 2.1 hons as the first degree you did - I was at bar school with someone in this position who got to interview stage - but it would have to be a whole degree not the COL one.
    It is correct..... GLS recruitment website http://www.gls.gov.uk/graduaterecrui...ligibility.htm

    "You should have, or be predicted to obtain, a minimum 2:1 degree in your first degree discipline (i.e. an undergraduate degree below a masters degree), which does not have to be in law.

    Please note that we are willing to consider applications from candidates who did not achieve a 2.1 degree but where there is evidence of mitigating circumstances e.g. serious illness. In such circumstances applicants will be required to complete a mitigating circumstances form and submit the required written evidence from their university/ exam board."
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    (Original post by Saxaphone Joe)
    What about plan C: the accelerated LLB in scotland with a view to the GLS for Scotland. The acc llb would give me an undergrad qualification and I would be able to apply for a tc after the first year with my grades for that year behind me. I would also gain some experience on a placement in a firm on this course.
    Would this make me a more plausible candidate? And doing it at a Uni like Stirling may be a cheaper way to do it. A chance for optimism?

    Thanks for the honest responses; the last thing I want is to go into this with niave misconceptions. Saying that though, my ambitions are currently caving in on themselves. It would be nice, as this discussion draws to a close, if you could offer a final piece of advice. What would you do in my situation?
    See my post re: GLS.

    My advice is as first - do a proper law degree at night school while working to fund it - if you get a 1st or, depending where you study a 2.1, a lot will be forgiven. If you don't consistently get top marks then its probably not going to happen.

    On a seperate note i meant to say before the non hons thing is only applicable in scotland as english degrees are all hons as they are generally 3 not 4 year degrees there is no concept of the 3rd year exit point and 4th year being hons in england so employers are unlikely to be aware you are lacking the hons hack. Dont know what bearing this would have in scotland.
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    (Original post by Ethereal)
    It is correct..... GLS recruitment website http://www.gls.gov.uk/graduaterecrui...ligibility.htm

    "You should have, or be predicted to obtain, a minimum 2:1 degree in your first degree discipline (i.e. an undergraduate degree below a masters degree), which does not have to be in law.

    Please note that we are willing to consider applications from candidates who did not achieve a 2.1 degree but where there is evidence of mitigating circumstances e.g. serious illness. In such circumstances applicants will be required to complete a mitigating circumstances form and submit the required written evidence from their university/ exam board."
    You are wrong. It only has to be an undergraduate degree. I can assure you I know someone in this position who got to interview stage. Anyway for the purposes of this thread the GLS is damn competitive anyway and probably not going to be for this poster.
 
 
 
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