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12 year old boy with higher IQ than Einstein develops his own theory of relativity watch

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    (Original post by S_123)
    Exactly! Some of the comments have annoyed me. It's like that saying: 'you can never be old and wise unless you were young and crazy'. Why are they projecting a certain type of behaviour on people of the same age? Just be happy whether that means going out and partying or staying in and doing some Maths sums.
    Agree
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    (Original post by S_123)
    I haven't negged you but I don't agree with your comment. He's clearly not like other kids with his brains and aspergers syndrome, this is what he wanted to do from the article. It's unlikely he feels he's 'missed out'. I just don't think it's right to claim that there is a 'right' childhood and a 'wrong' one. E.g. I read loads when I was younger and have been told I 'missed out' on going out and playing which I didn't as I did that as well but I was happy with a book anyway. Someone else made this statement earlier in the thread as well so it's not just you.
    I understand this reasoning, but I have personal experience within my family with an unusual gifted, probably autistic child, and I can assure you that often times such children are painfully aware that they're not "normal". I think it's great that this kid is so smart, but I have a lot of pity for him too, as he's somewhat similar to my sister (although she hasn't got it quite as bad).
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    (Original post by danny111)
    Is that legal?
    I'm pretty sure it is. IQtest.com is not legally obliged to give an accurate value for my IQ.

    Anyway, IQ is a very meaningless value in the grand scheme of things - it only indicates how good you are at taking IQ tests.

    What is not legal however (I'm pretty sure) is the note I found in my uni accommodation kitchen saying that my insurance is invalid because someone else left a door open. (A tad random but I'm in a "is it legal?" sort of mood at the moment!)
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    (Original post by insoms)
    Infact I would go so far as to argue that the person who posted that is the one 'missing out' by never experiencing books to the same degree, or never knowing the beauty and power of the calculus that boy was demonstrating.
    That's a rather large assumption to make about me.
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    (Original post by BlueJoker)
    That's a rather large assumption to make about me.
    Its the same one you made about the kid
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    (Original post by mckinnon94)
    I saw nothing different between the notation he used and the notation we use up in Scotland!
    Only difference I noticed was when he said "f prime of X" we'd say "f dash of x"
    The video of him is just him going over basic integral calculus, so I'm not trying to act all smart by pretending to understand him or nothing :P

    Props to the little guy, all of that in one week is immense! PhD Astrophysicists too...Love it! Hope you disprove the big bang little dude!
    Agreed, 'prime' is infact the proper name for it alot of my lecturers use that notation and call it 'f prime'.

    It's just personal choice theres alot of different ways of notating it.

    There's also the Newton method, which involves putting a dot above it. Nowadays we use it to denote a differential with respect to time.

    x (with a dot above it) = f '(t) = dx/dt
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    Pfft, relativity's been old hat for like 60 years...
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    :lolwut: I'm learning from him :ahee:
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    I developed a theory about peanut butter sandwhiches when I was twelve but I don't boast about it.
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    I'm gonna get neg repped for this but that kid merely absorbs any material thrown at him - thats why he can learn so damn quickly - eidetic/photographic memory.
    Doesn't necessarily mean he will have the "imagination" to come up with something entirely new.
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    (Original post by darknessbehold)
    I'm gonna get neg repped for this but that kid merely absorbs any material thrown at him - thats why he can learn so damn quickly - eidetic/photographic memory.
    Doesn't necessarily mean he will have the "imagination" to come up with something entirely new.
    Eidetic memory will only allow you to tackle simple problems. YOu would need a much stronger understanding to do the type of work he can. Perhaps what you describe hapenend in that first week he leaned everything, and he only did simple problems so it 'appeared' as though he understood it all, but even then, over time his understanding would have grown and he would eventually be capable of the owrk he is doing now.
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    (Original post by Broderss)
    Guys have you never seen the film Limitless? This kid will run out of pills and eventually he'll go back to being a failed writer going no where in life.
    People most of the time don't like to think that this is true but unfortunately this is the case. Sooner or later he will come to realise the lack of social life and possible alienation as he gets older no matter how many awards, nobel prizes he wins. With every great ability comes a great price (no I'm not talking about that spiderman shiz)

    The harsh truth which people will neg. Go ahead. I'm on a neg hat trick anyways :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by morecambebay)
    Its the same one you made about the kid
    I said "stories like this make me kinda sad". So not really the same, you were just being rude...
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    (Original post by Tomato_Soup1992)
    Eidetic memory will only allow you to tackle simple problems. YOu would need a much stronger understanding to do the type of work he can. Perhaps what you describe hapenend in that first week he leaned everything, and he only did simple problems so it 'appeared' as though he understood it all, but even then, over time his understanding would have grown and he would eventually be capable of the owrk he is doing now.
    Listen mate i do not care. I think we've already established the fact that this kid is a genius of his age.
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    I read an article on child prodigies who were all grown up, and who the media had given a lot of attention when they were young, and the outcome of these kids isn't as grand as these articles would lead us to believe.

    They either end up as academics with a few papers to their name, which is not bad by any means, but they don't set the world on fire like the media suggests they will(becoming the next Einstein, Feynman etc..), or they end up burning out, succumbing to drugs or tragically suicide.

    I'll also add that many of those who are heralded to be the stuff of great genius(again Einstein, Feynman and Hawking etc...), were noted for being quite unremarkable as students in their childhoods.
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    (Original post by morecambebay)
    Can we stop with the 'normal' childhood bull****. It's like the rumour that getting a 2:1 is better than getting a first because 'it shows that you have social skills innit'.

    Lies.
    This. It's possible to get a first and a social life. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by brushless-man)
    To the people who are saying that he isnt having a proper childhood, what the **** does that mean as long as it makes him happy thats what counts.
    Agreed, leave the boy alone.
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    Just sayin' that IQ is not an accurate measure of intelligence. It was a system designed to test people with mental health problems who were likely to have low IQs. I'm not saying that this young man isn't extremely intelligent, merely that IQ is not the ultimate indicator of intelligence that many seem to treat it as.

    Absolutely amazing work for a 12 year old, I must say.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    So sad that he hasn't known what its like to have a normal, fun, carefree childhood.
    Neither did Beethoven or Mozart really know what it was like to bum off, Mozart composed at 5 and performed at 6.
    Except nowadays they do have child psychologists who try to make help as much as possible, unlike 5 centuries ago. Think about it this way, he wasn't tortured into it.
    I hate it when ppl look down on or feel sorry for genious talent, on the grounds of a "normal life". Give the kid a break, I bet you anything he WANTS to study that.
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    (Original post by milkytea)
    Just sayin' that IQ is not an accurate measure of intelligence. It was a system designed to test people with mental health problems who were likely to have low IQs. I'm not saying that this young man isn't extremely intelligent, merely that IQ is not the ultimate indicator of intelligence that many seem to treat it as.

    Absolutely amazing work for a 12 year old, I must say.
    I think there are 7 or 9 stated areas of intelligence: social intelligence, artistic, physical/agility, mathematical, psychological, logical, and some others. I think IQ tests only test for logical and math.
 
 
 
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