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12 year old boy with higher IQ than Einstein develops his own theory of relativity watch

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    I think stories like this are kinda sad :/ He's doing adult stuff, he's missed out on so much.

    EDIT: If you're going to neg me, explain why -_-
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    bull****, he's probably a clever chap but we hear these sort stories every year.
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    absolute lad!
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    Good on him. Hope he goes far in life, and is allowed to be a child as well.
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    He's smarter than Sheldon! But no it doesn't make me feel insignificant: everyone has their talents and gifts.
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    (Original post by Ewan)
    Hmm?
    In the UK, Pure Mathematicians tend to use Leibniz notation for calculus, i.e,  dy/dx , whereas Engineers/ Physicists use Newtonian / Lagrangian notion.

    The second method always seems to a little messy and easy to make errors with (mistaking orders due to not including the right number of primes).

    It was actually a bit of a Maths joke about how we all use the same notation, but appropriate it differently depending on what we're doing.

    I also just prefer Leibniz' notation. Call me a Romantic.


    ...

    Nevermind .

    Edit: You did Maths at UCL, so what I just said was pretty much pointless. .
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    Brilliant!
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    So sad that he hasn't known what its like to have a normal, fun, carefree childhood.
    Considering hia autism, I think he'd be much happier with what he's doing now then struggling to fit in with kids who don't understand.

    Off topic: Something about Child prodiges always bugs me. They do this really complex maths from a very young age, but surely that must mean he was introduced to complex maths from a very young age. His parents aren't mathematical, and his school probably wouldn't have handed him calculus, so how did he start doing this? Unless, when it sais he taught himself the maths, it means he derived them? That seems unlikely. I hope this doesn't sound like envy: it's not. I'm just curious how this comes about. From my experience, it would be, even for someone as capable as him, that he would go to school just like everyone else, but act differently and think differently to everyone else. He wouldn't fit in - He would very liekly spend a lot of time on sites such as wikipedia: but how would he have known to come across something like calculus....
    Can someone help me out here?
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    smart kiddo
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    Every time I think I'm actually alright at physics, and I get most of the simple stuff, I see something like this.
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    (Original post by TwilightKnight)
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    Lol I don't think it matters too much, as long as what you actually write down is correct. You'll find university lecturers all use different kinds of notation, it often doesn't even seem to follow any logical pattern - sometimes changing notation mid proof for instance :sigh:

    (Original post by Tomato_Soup1992)
    Considering hia autism, I think he'd be much happier with what he's doing now then struggling to fit in with kids who don't understand.

    Off topic: Something about Child prodiges always bugs me. They do this really complex maths from a very young age, but surely that must mean he was introduced to complex maths from a very young age. His parents aren't mathematical, and his school probably wouldn't have handed him calculus, so how did he start doing this? Unless, when it sais he taught himself the maths, it means he derived them? That seems unlikely. I hope this doesn't sound like envy: it's not. I'm just curious how this comes about. From my experience, it would be, even for someone as capable as him, that he would go to school just like everyone else, but act differently and think differently to everyone else. He wouldn't fit in - He would very liekly spend a lot of time on sites such as wikipedia: but how would he have known to come across something like calculus....
    Can someone help me out here?
    He will of been shown the material, but while it takes most people a long time to understand things he will understand them instantly. It's perfectly possible he figured out elementary calculus on his own though without having heard about it, but I wouldn't of thought that would be the case having grown up in the states.
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    He'll inevitably become ****ed up by late teenagehood like most child prodigies.
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    When I was eight I think I was still struggling over chimney sums!!!
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    Um, okay logging off TSR...
    Off to revise for A'levels!
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    That is the most mind-blowing thing ever.

    (Original post by jelly1000)
    So sad that he hasn't known what its like to have a normal, fun, carefree childhood.
    A normal childhood is incredibly overrated. Clearly this kid is extremely passionate about Physics and is able to pursue his topic of interest from a very young age. Sounds like a better childhood than the "normal" childhood I had.

    He does have some behavioural and development issues, but I hope that he will flourish in the environment he's been provided with.
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    Albert Einstein didn't have Asperger's syndrome. Still, it is pretty special, even for someone with Asperger's syndrome, to have an IQ of 170 and be dealing with all of those mathematical concepts at that age.
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    (Original post by Persie)
    I feel so stupid and insignificant now.
    Agreed. **** me, he taught himself all of that maths in a week?



    Good luck to him either way!
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    So sad that he hasn't known what its like to have a normal, fun, carefree childhood.
    Why is it sad? This kid obviously has a passion and flare for mathematics and can swallow up vast amounts of knowledge far in excess of most adults.

    Surely to force him to act like a regular child would simply bore him.
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    I want to steal his brain somehow...
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    So sad that he hasn't known what its like to have a normal, fun, carefree childhood.
    How do you know that?
 
 
 
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