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    At uni we were taught the acronym "Rapriop"

    Reassurance and explanation
    Advice
    Prescription
    Referral
    Investigation
    Observation
    Prevention

    I really dislike this approach but don't know any other alternatives. In our OSCE we had to write up management plans for acute scenarios and this didn't quite fit the bill. Any ideas? :confused:
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    What school are you at? Rapriop only works for GP management plans.

    Try this...

    Differential Dx/Problem List
    Investigations
    Prescription
    Other Management (fluids etc)
    Monitoring (Obs, fluid balance etc)
    Referral
    Follow-up
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    (Original post by Scipio)
    What school are you at? Rapriop only works for GP management plans.

    Try this...

    Differential Dx/Problem List
    Investigations
    Prescription
    Other Management (fluids etc)
    Monitoring (Obs, fluid balance etc)
    Referral
    Follow-up
    Leicester. Oh gosh, that's so much better. I'm guessing ABC would be better for acute scenarios followed by the above?
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    Mx:

    Admit
    IV access
    Bloods
    Imaging/Investigations
    Prescriptions
    Observations
    Referrals
    Short term plans
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    (Original post by Wild_Precious_Life)
    Leicester. Oh gosh, that's so much better. I'm guessing ABC would be better for acute scenarios followed by the above?
    ABC is for immediate management - if any of them are significantly compromised you're probably doing rather than planning. Always a useful way of remembering your top priorities though. Both lists above are sensible systems.

    A good post-take ward round is a good way to get your head around how this stuff works in practice.
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    (Original post by Wild_Precious_Life)
    Leicester. Oh gosh, that's so much better. I'm guessing ABC would be better for acute scenarios followed by the above?
    Thought so lol, I'm a Leicester student too, just did finals. The format I wrote out is what we got e-mailed to us before IPE, so I suggest stick with that.

    Acute scenario stuff you'll learn when you do your Acute Care Block.
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    I've got to say I never got taught a mnemonic, and both of those are fairly poor and non-memorable.

    My basic plan format (for inpatient management, GP is a bit different) is
    Investigations, split into bloods/imaging/other, always starting with simple/immediate stuff (FBC, CXR, ABG, urine dip) moving onto more complex stuff that may not be done right now (Less common bloods, CT, USS etc)
    Treatments, split into procedures (catheter, cannula), medications and other (physio etc)
    Referral/admission
    What has been explained to pt/family.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    I've got to say I never got taught a mnemonic, and both of those are fairly poor and non-memorable.

    My basic plan format (for inpatient management, GP is a bit different) is
    Investigations, split into bloods/imaging/other, always starting with simple/immediate stuff (FBC, CXR, ABG, urine dip) moving onto more complex stuff that may not be done right now (Less common bloods, CT, USS etc)
    Treatments, split into procedures (catheter, cannula), medications and other (physio etc)
    Referral/admission
    What has been explained to pt/family.
    The seond one is quite useful imo. It's just a prompt for me to make sure I cover everything in a systematic way more than anything else. It's not always applicable but it's good for our OSCEs which are ridiculously time resistricted giving you very little time to think.

    The first is what we use whilst in the room with the patient during our GP block, so it's essentially explaining the management to the patient as well as being a prompt for what needs to be covered...for example a patient with OA knee

    Reassurance ...explain the likely diagnosis that it may be and explain it
    Advise ...Conservative management advise e.g. lose weight
    Prescription ...medical management such as NSAIDs
    Referral ...PT/Orthopaedics if necessary
    Investigations ...AP and lateral knee Xray
    Observation ...this is follow-up, so tell them to come back if things don't get better or become worse in say, 4 weeks
    Prevention ...a reminder to give general lifestyle advise, stop smoking, make sure cervical smears are up to date etc

    That one's pretty memorable for us as it's taught to us officially and used in our assessment during our GP rotation.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    I've got to say I never got taught a mnemonic, and both of those are fairly poor and non-memorable.

    My basic plan format (for inpatient management, GP is a bit different) is
    Investigations, split into bloods/imaging/other, always starting with simple/immediate stuff (FBC, CXR, ABG, urine dip) moving onto more complex stuff that may not be done right now (Less common bloods, CT, USS etc)
    Treatments, split into procedures (catheter, cannula), medications and other (physio etc)
    Referral/admission
    What has been explained to pt/family.
    This is good an pretty close to what I use, I'd just highlight Specialities (I.e Refer cardio, surg R/V , etc.) and Location (CCU, gastro ward, to stay on MAU).
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    (Original post by Scipio)
    Thought so lol, I'm a Leicester student too, just did finals. The format I wrote out is what we got e-mailed to us before IPE, so I suggest stick with that.

    Acute scenario stuff you'll learn when you do your Acute Care Block.
    Oh no wonder you knew about RAPRIOP! How did the exam go? I hope you found it ok
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    (Original post by Wild_Precious_Life)
    Oh no wonder you knew about RAPRIOP! How did the exam go? I hope you found it ok
    Both papers were terrible. Really random questions, a lot of us felt that if we had taken a break for a month before we'd have done the same lol. This is typical of finals here though really, the paper last year was a bit retarded too. We had a massive fail rate compared to other schools then, hopefully this year we've all done better! OSCE patients weren't very good either but I'm staying positive, I usually pull it out the bag .
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    (Original post by Scipio)
    Both papers were terrible. Really random questions, a lot of us felt that if we had taken a break for a month before we'd have done the same lol. This is typical of finals here though really, the paper last year was a bit retarded too. We had a massive fail rate compared to other schools then, hopefully this year we've all done better! OSCE patients weren't very good either but I'm staying positive, I usually pull it out the bag .
    How did it go? I hope you passed and are now on your elective!
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    (Original post by Wild_Precious_Life)
    How did it go? I hope you passed and are now on your elective!
    Passed! Elective starting in a week or two, wohooo!
 
 
 
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