Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Dogs in parks ... Watch

    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Thing is, why would you walk your dog in a park if you know there are lots of other dogs about and she doesn't get on with them?? People walk puppies in park and teach them how to come back, they will make numerous errors but you cannot teach them otherwise. So I expect at the very least you would get many young and adolescent dogs running up to yours and you can't blame that. If your dog doesn't like other dogs don't walk your dog near other dogs, simple.

    People should always have control over their dogs but in instances with young or adolescent dogs this is not always possible and you cannot expect them to learn otherwise.

    In case anyone wonders I don't walk my dogs in parks. Having a golden retriever we get little kids running at him with open arms going OMG FLUFFY DOGGGGGG and he gets very excited then gets greeted with tail pulling and tail stroking which he doesn't really like. He wont be nasty but he just doesn't like his tail being played with and I don't want him to have any problems with little kids. We walk through a local reserve with cycle tracks through and a kiddy play park at one end and in the middle and if kids ask to pet him they can but in normal parks there would be too many people for the dogs to be able to do anything. I take mine out in the car to local footpaths and the like instead, one has bad allergies and people who see him always want to feed him which gives him a reaction so I'm not a huge fan of walking where there are loads of people.

    I keep mine on lunge lines mostly as the golden loves to chase and the labrador was never taught recall and is quite slow at getting it. So I do think people should have control as best they can at all times, but also if your dog doesn't like other dogs it may give off signals other dogs do not like hence be attacked. I would not walk a dog who does not like other dogs, in areas where you know there will be other dogs. Bad idea.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I take her to the park so she can get used to other dogs being around so instead of going mad everytime she sees another dog she will just ignore them. I dont walk right up to other dogs with her because that would be stupid, I avoid the other dogs completely but she'll never learn if I just keep her away from others.

    In the case of young dogs, they could be kept on extendable leads to teach them to come back when shouted then once they definitely listen to their owner (come back as soon as shouted) they can be off the lead.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tinsley)
    Thing is, why would you walk your dog in a park if you know there are lots of other dogs about and she doesn't get on with them??
    Where else can you walk a dog?xx
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by blinkbelle)
    Where else can you walk a dog?xx
    Public footpaths, just round towns/housing estates/woods/fields etc.

    I've never ever walked mine in a park, its never really crossed my mind. Where I lived first we were surrounded by footpaths and here there are not as many but I much prefer to go out to those or to a quieter area and walk in places where there is actually stuff for the dogs to smell. My golden gets really quiet with daily walks even at the reserve which isn't really a park, simply because so many dogs go there he just plods along I guess as all the smells have been marked over by other dogs. Take him somewhere quieter and he has much more fun sniffing and following scents

    First time my dog went to a park was when he was 2 and its Hylands Park in Essex which is huge and hosts V Festival so its not typically busy unless its bright and sunny, even then its not like there are particular areas for kids anyway.

    The other alternative is to walk during unsocial hours. Being a golden retriever my dog gets really hot and in summer time I can't walk him between 8am-6pm a lot of days so I'm up at 6 to give him a good go out and give him time to cool off before the sun makes it too warm.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MissLightyear)
    I take her to the park so she can get used to other dogs being around so instead of going mad everytime she sees another dog she will just ignore them. I dont walk right up to other dogs with her because that would be stupid, I avoid the other dogs completely but she'll never learn if I just keep her away from others.

    In the case of young dogs, they could be kept on extendable leads to teach them to come back when shouted then once they definitely listen to their owner (come back as soon as shouted) they can be off the lead.
    Sad fact is I think parks being so readily available attract a lot of people who just let their dogs off and throw balls etc, I tend to find the popular local areas have a lot more dogs who's owners don't even pay attention to where they are.

    Do you walk her in unsocial hours, got any friends with dogs you know are really good she can practice with? I just worry going to such popular areas like parks she stands more chance of a grumpy or unattentive dog with matching owner who may charge up to her and wreck all your work.

    We got a labrador last November who was about 16 months old. He wasn't bad with other dogs just very nervous and not really sure what he's meant to do. If I took him down the reserve here and a dog came up to him he would cack his pants. A lot of dogs seemed to go for him because he still had his man bits and they felt they could dominate him. I got really angry that so many people let their dogs come tearing up to a dog onlead who was quite obviously not sure what to do. When it was snowy I had no choice but to take him there as I couldn't get the car out so I just went during the most unsocial hours I could.

    Not being mean I just think parks attract everyone who is local because its easy to go to and sadly a lot of people only take their dogs there and so the dogs treat it more like a garden and don't pay attention to their owners (if their owners even call them, some are nowhere to be seen...). If you could find some quieter places or befriend someone with a very chilled out dog and build it up that way, maybe even walk her with that dog so her confidence increases and she's not so worried and unsure if she has a friend and can copy what they do?

    Re young dogs, extendy leads can be quite dangerous. They are also only 16 feet long which isn't too long to practice. Plus all dogs go through a teenage rebellious stage, that's why my golden is still on his lunge line a lot now, he just likes to chase and I can't trust him not to chase something and run onto a main road My golden was on an extendy til 5 months old then offlead and fantastic. At 10 months old he had to go back on the lead and has been on ever since more or less. Even on D Day of trying them offlead sometimes they surprise you and fail completely at recall despite lots of practice.

    If people are apologetic about it I don't mind in the least and I think you just have to accept it, but if people don't give a toss its just a bit rubbish, sadly not much can be done
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tinsley)
    Sad fact is I think parks being so readily available attract a lot of people who just let their dogs off and throw balls etc, I tend to find the popular local areas have a lot more dogs who's owners don't even pay attention to where they are.

    Do you walk her in unsocial hours, got any friends with dogs you know are really good she can practice with? I just worry going to such popular areas like parks she stands more chance of a grumpy or unattentive dog with matching owner who may charge up to her and wreck all your work.

    We got a labrador last November who was about 16 months old. He wasn't bad with other dogs just very nervous and not really sure what he's meant to do. If I took him down the reserve here and a dog came up to him he would cack his pants. A lot of dogs seemed to go for him because he still had his man bits and they felt they could dominate him. I got really angry that so many people let their dogs come tearing up to a dog onlead who was quite obviously not sure what to do. When it was snowy I had no choice but to take him there as I couldn't get the car out so I just went during the most unsocial hours I could.

    Not being mean I just think parks attract everyone who is local because its easy to go to and sadly a lot of people only take their dogs there and so the dogs treat it more like a garden and don't pay attention to their owners (if their owners even call them, some are nowhere to be seen...). If you could find some quieter places or befriend someone with a very chilled out dog and build it up that way, maybe even walk her with that dog so her confidence increases and she's not so worried and unsure if she has a friend and can copy what they do?

    Re young dogs, extendy leads can be quite dangerous. They are also only 16 feet long which isn't too long to practice. Plus all dogs go through a teenage rebellious stage, that's why my golden is still on his lunge line a lot now, he just likes to chase and I can't trust him not to chase something and run onto a main road My golden was on an extendy til 5 months old then offlead and fantastic. At 10 months old he had to go back on the lead and has been on ever since more or less. Even on D Day of trying them offlead sometimes they surprise you and fail completely at recall despite lots of practice.

    If people are apologetic about it I don't mind in the least and I think you just have to accept it, but if people don't give a toss its just a bit rubbish, sadly not much can be done
    Well her morning walk is at 7am, then her evening one is 5ish when people tend to be in work, and when we take her to the park its usually 8/9 in the morning at weekends.

    I suppose youre right. I dont mind if they apologise though its when they make out its completely my fault. My dog spent years on the street before I adopted her so its understandable that she thinks she's going to be attacked. I could have easily got a newborn puppy but I wanted to give a dog thats not had much of a life a chance which is why im working so hard to sort her behaviour so she can just enjoy her new life.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tinsley)
    Public footpaths, just round towns/housing estates/woods/fields etc.

    I've never ever walked mine in a park, its never really crossed my mind. Where I lived first we were surrounded by footpaths and here there are not as many but I much prefer to go out to those or to a quieter area and walk in places where there is actually stuff for the dogs to smell. My golden gets really quiet with daily walks even at the reserve which isn't really a park, simply because so many dogs go there he just plods along I guess as all the smells have been marked over by other dogs. Take him somewhere quieter and he has much more fun sniffing and following scents

    First time my dog went to a park was when he was 2 and its Hylands Park in Essex which is huge and hosts V Festival so its not typically busy unless its bright and sunny, even then its not like there are particular areas for kids anyway.

    The other alternative is to walk during unsocial hours. Being a golden retriever my dog gets really hot and in summer time I can't walk him between 8am-6pm a lot of days so I'm up at 6 to give him a good go out and give him time to cool off before the sun makes it too warm.
    We can't walk our dog on footpaths precisely because we'd come across dozens of other dogs. We walk him on 'the valley' (not a park really) but we still come across other people, despite working out when the fewest people are about. It's impossible to avoid ANY other dogs tbh xx
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MissLightyear)
    Well her morning walk is at 7am, then her evening one is 5ish when people tend to be in work, and when we take her to the park its usually 8/9 in the morning at weekends.

    I suppose youre right. I dont mind if they apologise though its when they make out its completely my fault. My dog spent years on the street before I adopted her so its understandable that she thinks she's going to be attacked. I could have easily got a newborn puppy but I wanted to give a dog thats not had much of a life a chance which is why im working so hard to sort her behaviour so she can just enjoy her new life.
    Yeah no I understand where you're coming from I was getting very frustrated with our newer dog the way we had no choice but to use the reserve in the snow and so many people just let their dogs come and hassle him sort of thing. It is annoying and that's why I tend to go further out now just because it stops him getting all stressed and tense.

    It is annoying how someone can literally wreck all your months of work by letting their dog rush up and hassle your own without looking or calling them back. I do know where your coming from, hopefully you'll come across less troublesome owners/dogs to give yours the chance to build up her confidence without meeting herds of excited ones
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by blinkbelle)
    We can't walk our dog on footpaths precisely because we'd come across dozens of other dogs. We walk him on 'the valley' (not a park really) but we still come across other people, despite working out when the fewest people are about. It's impossible to avoid ANY other dogs tbh xx
    I'm not on about avoiding any dogs, just avoiding huge amounts when many seem badly behaved. In parks round here its where EVERYBODY walks kind of thing. Out of ten dogs probably four down there are dog aggressive, another four seem to have no owner in sight and only about two seem well behaved and have owners following them about.

    I like going to areas where there are fewer dogs. Certainly in both places I have lived I meet very few people on footpaths and usually they are abiding by the rules (ie dogs on lead at all times even if its a very long lead) and they put their own dog onlead when they see yours or call them away sort of thing. I have just had much less problems going to places like footpaths in comparison to parks which always seem very busy and like I said my dog enjoys very dog busy places much less than slightly quieter ones.

    Maybe its just where I live, first place was hugely rural and where I am now most people commute into London hence everyone crowds the local areas like reserve when they get chance. 11am sort of thing it will be very quiet but aside from that its normally quite busy. I just feel like with out black lab its easier to go to areas where there are fewer dogs to get them used to other dogs presence whereas he would panic much more the more dogs he saw sort of thing, just didn't know what to do around them
    Offline

    7
    If a dog is 'uncontrollable' i.e. does not respond to any human, it should definately be on a lead. Even well trained dogs should be on leads in areas which could possibly be dangerous, like near roads, or areas with lots of wildlife, etc.
    In the best of a dogs interest, socialisation should be on the owners terms, in calm situations, otherwise the dog will be unnaturally reactive towards other dogs and this bad state of mind causes fights.

    You are right to have your dog on a lead, but if you find that this attacking from other dogs occurs more, I would buy a muzzle to save form any nips that your dog may use to teach the other dog right from wrong.
    so many people see 'fights' as dangerous - when mostly theyre just lots of noise in the majority of cases/
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you rather give up salt or pepper?
    Useful resources
    AtCTs

    Ask the Community Team

    Got a question about the site content or our moderation? Ask here.

    Welcome Lounge

    Welcome Lounge

    We're a friendly bunch. Post here if you're new to TSR.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.