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Miliband compares plight of public sector workers to apartheid watch

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    http://www.politics.co.uk/news/econo...-$21388057.htm
    What a total disgrace this man is. Comparing the lives of murdered, tortured and sdiscriminated black South Africans, to pmpered public sector employees. I'm sure many people living in south africa even now, would jump at the chance to have a final salary pension, high job security, long holidays and short working hours. he should retract these insulting comments immediately.
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    If you actually read it he doesn't compare the problems of the protesters to the problems of black South Africans, he compares their political activism to that of the anti-apartheid movement. The 'anti-apartheid struggle' actually involved a lot people who weren't black, South African or directly affected by the apartheid.
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    (Original post by TheGrandmaster)
    If you actually read it he doesn't compare the problems of the protesters to the problems of black South Africans, he compares their political activism to that of the anti-apartheid movement. The 'anti-apartheid struggle' actually involved a lot people who weren't black, South African or directly affected by the apartheid.
    Even that is a bit of a stretch tbf
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    It's interesting that the link in the OP doesn't actually quote the part of the speech mentioned in the title, just paraphrases in a manner which will inevitably be influenced by the author's own politics. Anyone got the full text so we can see what was really said?
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    (Original post by usainlightning)
    http://www.politics.co.uk/news/econo...-$21388057.htm
    What a total disgrace this man is. Comparing the lives of murdered, tortured and sdiscriminated black South Africans, to pmpered public sector employees. I'm sure many people living in south africa even now, would jump at the chance to have a final salary pension, high job security, long holidays and short working hours. he should retract these insulting comments immediately.
    Do you notice how he is so desperate to paint these cuts as a criminal act? I don't hear or see the coalition grinning and saying "We will wage class warfare!!!!". Labour, however, is trying to paint this image. It is wrong, it shouldn't be.

    Can't wait untill the 2015 election, for if the coalition policy more than pays off, Labour will be decimated.
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    (Original post by Aj12)
    Even that is a bit of a stretch tbf
    Yeah, personally I don't really see the similarity. But I don't think you can have a go at Milliband for something that he didn't actually say.
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    (Original post by Aj12)
    Even that is a bit of a stretch tbf
    A bit of a stretch and while I disagree with Milliband's metaphor, it isn't as offensive as the original poster suggested.
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    OMG that's like soo politically incorrect!
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    (Original post by TheGrandmaster)
    If you actually read it he doesn't compare the problems of the protesters to the problems of black South Africans, he compares their political activism to that of the anti-apartheid movement. The 'anti-apartheid struggle' actually involved a lot people who weren't black, South African or directly affected by the apartheid.
    Even then there is absolutely no comparison. This march was just public sector workers and unions, all Labour supporters, who were angry because they're not in power anymore. To compare that to the apartheid is offensive and insulting to a genuine cause against injustice.
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    (Original post by Stanley Baldwin)
    Do you notice how he is so desperate to paint these cuts as a criminal act? I don't hear or see the coalition grinning and saying "We will wage class warfare!!!!". Labour, however, is trying to paint this image. It is wrong, it shouldn't be.

    Can't wait untill the 2015 election, for if the coalition policy more than pays off, Labour will be decimated.
    Without trying to be agumentative, I can't see any reason why the coalition's policies should 'pay off.' There is no logical link between taking money out of the economy and growth.
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    (Original post by Tnetinbum)
    Even then there is absolutely no comparison. This march was just public sector workers and unions, all Labour supporters, who were angry because they're not in power anymore. To compare that to the apartheid is offensive and insulting to a genuine cause against injustice.
    How do you know they are all Labour supporters? That's a completely unfounded assumption.
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    (Original post by Tnetinbum)
    Even then there is absolutely no comparison. This march was just public sector workers and unions, all Labour supporters, who were angry because they're not in power anymore. To compare that to the apartheid is offensive and insulting to a genuine cause against injustice.
    Lots of Socialist Worker's Party, Communist Party of Great Britain, Respect Party and Green Party banners there as well. Even saw a cheeky few Liberal Democrat banners.
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    (Original post by ConZoR)
    Without trying to be agumentative, I can't see any reason why the coalition's policies should 'pay off.' There is no logical link between taking money out of the economy and growth.
    Well the theory is through a few well placed tax cuts. Like the Cut in corp tax other companies will invest in the UK. At the same time you make it easier to set up a business. This can lead to growth hopefully.

    You then make the tax code a lot simpler and go for tax avoidance and evasion.

    This will help put money back into the economy. so the coalition is not just taking cash out
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    (Original post by Fusilero)
    Lots of Socialist Worker's Party, Communist Party of Great Britain, Respect Party and Green Party banners there as well. Even saw a cheeky few Liberal Democrat banners.
    All the same side of the political spectrum - left, public sector and union-run. Most of these can more or less be linked to the Labour party. A lot of Lib Dem voters voted for the party last May purely to try and get a coalition with Labour. Nobody was marching when the country was being bankrupt, when it was spending beyond its means or when tuition fees were first introduced despite Tony Blair saying there were no plans to do so.
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    (Original post by Aj12)
    Well the theory is through a few well placed tax cuts. Like the Cut in corp tax other companies will invest in the UK. At the same time you make it easier to set up a business. This can lead to growth hopefully.

    You then make the tax code a lot simpler and go for tax avoidance and evasion.

    This will help put money back into the economy. so the coalition is not just taking cash out
    I understand the theory behind the reduction in corporation tax, but that is not deficit reduction. He's taking, what, £111bn out in 4 years in the form of cuts, and, at times of uncertainty such as these, confidence is low anyway, so nobody is going to invest in a market that they expect to shrink, as a result of a massive withdrawal of public money.

    It might work, yes, but wasn't it similar austerity measures that led to the 30s depression?
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    (Original post by ConZoR)
    I understand the theory behind the reduction in corporation tax, but that is not deficit reduction. He's taking, what, £111bn out in 4 years in the form of cuts, and, at times of uncertainty such as these, confidence is low anyway, so nobody is going to invest in a market that they expect to shrink, as a result of a massive withdrawal of public money.

    It might work, yes, but wasn't it similar austerity measures that led to the 30s depression?
    I don't think so but I could be wrong.

    I guess we will know how well the cuts are going by the end of this year.
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    (Original post by ConZoR)
    Without trying to be agumentative, I can't see any reason why the coalition's policies should 'pay off.' There is no logical link between taking money out of the economy and growth.
    If you can explain to me how employing 10 times the number of civil service toilet cleaners will bring money into the UK, i'm all ears?
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    Well, according to Thatcher, apartheid wasn't even serious enough an issue to warrant British condemnation. It could even be argued that she was on the side of the oppressive white South African regime, even going as far as to call Mandela a terrorist.
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    (Original post by london12)
    If you can explain to me how employing 10 times the number of civil service toilet cleaners will bring money into the UK, i'm all ears?
    Nobody mentioned toilet cleaners, or even a figure for that matter! I was merely asking a question. I don't suggest that paying civil servants creates wealth in the same manner as investment, though in some cases it could. My point is, by sacking half a million workers we are taking money OUT of the economy, and there is absolutely no question about that. Goverment spending is the second biggest component of demand in the economy, bigger than investment or exports, and the cuts are reducing it. My point would not stand if all taxes were falling at the same time, but they are not.

    There is also a thing called the multiplier effect, where the impact on output is greater than the initial injection (government spending in this case) and it works both ways, so the cuts are likely to cause a greater drop in output than their actual size.

    Just to clarify, I am not questioning the need to do something about the deficit!
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    (Original post by ConZoR)
    Nobody mentioned toilet cleaners, or even a figure for that matter! I was merely asking a question. I don't suggest that paying civil servants creates wealth in the same manner as investment, though in some cases it could. My point is, by sacking half a million workers we are taking money OUT of the economy, and there is absolutely no question about that. Goverment spending is the second biggest component of demand in the economy, bigger than investment or exports, and the cuts are reducing it. My point would not stand if all taxes were falling at the same time, but they are not.

    There is also a thing called the multiplier effect, where the impact on output is greater than the initial injection (government spending in this case) and it works both ways, so the cuts are likely to cause a greater drop in output than their actual size.

    Just to clarify, I am not questioning the need to do something about the deficit!
    to your earlier comment, it wasn't these types of policies that led to the GD. you inadvertantely stumbled on the most important point though which is if the economy doesn't want to go anywhere, it isn't going to. basically though, what is important is what is happening at the margin and pissing more money up the wall on the public sector really isn't worth it. although these protests claim to be democratic any student of economics would know that is painfully ironic. really all your seeing is people in low-skill, low-pay jobs protesting cos they are losing their jobs. of course that is a massive minority compared to the people who don't have jobs because the people protesting do. in addition, the people protesting (unsuprisingly) are in jobs that often add little to know economic value (think the unbelivable amount of support given to dockworkers...its fun to protest but it ****s your economy). simple as, growth or no-growth, cuts are nesscessary.
 
 
 
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