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PQ
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#41
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#41
My insurance on my first car (a £600 metro) fully comp was £750, 3 months after passing my test aged 19
The second yr it went down to £450 but that was switching to 3rd party fire and theft
In May I'll have my full 5 yrs no claims bonus and my fully comp insurance on a 1.6 L reg astra works out at about £400pa (including having another named driver on there - dad-in-law). Next yr I'll be over 25 too so it will drop down another notch.

I'd never recommend driving as a named driver on your own car - if the insurance companies find out that you're the main driver and/or owner then it can invalidate your insurance cover completely...plus a no claims bonus is well worthwhile - my mum has been driving safely for yrs as a named driver but has (in theory) no no claims bonus.
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Baron
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#42
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#42
get this, its got big wheels:
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viviki
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#43
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#43
(Original post by Pencil Queen)
My insurance on my first car (a £600 metro) fully comp was £750, 3 months after passing my test aged 19
The second yr it went down to £450 but that was switching to 3rd party fire and theft
In May I'll have my full 5 yrs no claims bonus and my fully comp insurance on a 1.6 L reg astra works out at about £400pa (including having another named driver on there - dad-in-law). Next yr I'll be over 25 too so it will drop down another notch.

I'd never recommend driving as a named driver on your own car - if the insurance companies find out that you're the main driver and/or owner then it can invalidate your insurance cover completely...plus a no claims bonus is well worthwhile - my mum has been driving safely for yrs as a named driver but has (in theory) no no claims bonus.
On some insurance (more than I know definitely does it) you can have the policy in someones name but have the second named driver down as the main driver of the car which is good.
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PQ
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#44
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#44
(Original post by viviki)
On some insurance (more than I know definitely does it) you can have the policy in someones name but have the second named driver down as the main driver of the car which is good.
You do have to be very careful with insurance companies - anything they can use against you they will - and the worst thing is that you will only find out when you really need them
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viviki
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#45
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#45
(Original post by Zarjazz)
Then you got a bad one. What was wrong with it? Who did you buy it from? Do you know how to take care of a car?

Wzz is right, they're fantastic little cars, and easily the best supermini currently available if you want to enjoy driving and learn how to drive well. They've got excellent adjustable little chassis.
Course I know how to look after a car. I got it from a little local garage which has been going for years but unfortunately shut down just after I got the car.

There were major problems with the clutch and gearbox which I would have had to completely replace and I couldnt afford it. So I traded it in and got a loan off mum for a more reliable car.
I had tons of other engine niggles though, and in the six months I had it had it in for repairs 6 times!!
My friend had a 106 too and had similar problems with overheating engine niggles etc. The repair shops I took the car to (tried several to make sure they werent just crap) said that 106s after a certain age really arent that reliable.
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LH
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#46
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#46
Get a Yaris - they're brillaint and insurable.
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Zarjazz
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#47
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#47
(Original post by viviki)
My friend had a 106 too and had similar problems with overheating engine niggles etc. The repair shops I took the car to (tried several to make sure they werent just crap) said that 106s after a certain age really arent that reliable.
I ran a 106 GTi for years, and it never skipped a beat. Do you *really* know how to look after one, with regard to oil and coolant temperatures, mechanical sympathy, servicing, fluid changes etc....?

The only 106s I saw which were unreliable were ones that were knackered through people caning them from cold, not servicing them, and not looking after them. My engine certainly didn't overheat; did your friend have a working fan, and change the coolant at the appropriate intervals? Too many people buy old cars then assume they don't need maintenance.

What was wrong with your gearbox and clutch? All that can go wrong with clutches is that they need replaced; that's simple wear and tear. As far as the gearbox goes, if you manhandle one around when you've got a knackered clutch you're not doing it any favours.... when did you last replace the gearbox oil?
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Chicken
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#48
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#48
(Original post by viviki)
Who are you insured with Chicken I was £525 fully comp as a learner with me as the first named driver last year with one of the cheaper insurance companies for young people. Obviously I'm older but I'm under 25 so it wouldnt be that much more expensive for you surely. Some of my friends spend tons on car insurance simply because they cant be arsed to shop around. That was the cheapest quote I had the most expensive was more than £2500

I wouldnt get a peugeot 106, I got an R reg one last year cos nearly £3000 and it was that unreliable that I had to trade it in within 6 months.
I'm not sure, I think it's Norwich Union but I know my dad didn't shop round much as he did it with the company that both he and mum are on (which costs them £150 a year for both of them on it!). Bear in mind I was only 17 when learning, and am still not 19 yet. I think my dad is planning on changing it though (but since I don't pay it anyway i'm not that bothered at the moment!).

As for Peugeot 106's, I wouldn't go near one either...quite a few people in my year had ones that were about R reg age, and they all had problems. My driving instructor also had a 306 which he hated with a passion, the electrics mucked up continually and in the end he sold it after 6 months. Also one of my housemates here has a 206 which she says is really unreliable too.

Oh and my dad had a Peugeot 40something yonks ago and one day he went to open the door and the whole door came off in his hand! But i'm sure that doesn't happen often!
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#49
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#49
women get cheaper insurance they want equality but they want cheap insurance! hah!
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PQ
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#50
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#50
(Original post by Gimp)
women get cheaper insurance they want equality but they want cheap insurance! hah!
Over 25s get cheaper insurance they want equality but they want cheap insurance! hah!

People with a proven record of safe driving get cheaper insurance they want equality but they want cheap insurance! hah!

People who drive cheap cars get cheaper insurance they want equality but they want cheap insurance! hah!

People who live in area with low crime rates and park their car off road get cheaper insurance they want equality but they want cheap insurance! hah!


Not really sure what your point is - insurance companies exist to make money out of people...if they can charge lower premiums (and so attract peoples custom) and still make a profit (which with women drivers it's been proven time and again that they can) then they will. It's not about equality it's about probability and what the actuaries say.
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#51
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The point is two people with identical records but of different sex will get different premiums based on their sex. It's quite simple.

And for the record - women crash more, however their accidents cost a lot less.
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PQ
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#52
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#52
(Original post by Gimp)
women crash more, however their accidents cost a lot less.
which is why the discrimination is justified - just as the odds show that it is profitable to charge lower premiums to mature drivers with experience/no claims or drivers of cars that cost less to replace etc etc...are you saying it's unfair that insurers charge variable premiums (say for example based on where you live - rich people in low crime neighbourhoods would pay less car insurance than someone living on a high crime estate) or are you saying it's only unfair when based on gender (regardless of the evidence that backs up the policy of insurers)
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#53
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#53
Obviously premiums are going to and should vary.

But I don't think it's fair to discriminate against new drivers purely on their sex. Which happens. We're not all boy racers and should not be treated as such
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PQ
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#54
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#54
(Original post by Gimp)
Obviously premiums are going to and should vary.

But I don't think it's fair to discriminate against new drivers purely on their sex. Which happens. We're not all boy racers and should not be treated as such
I agree I wish insurers had to back up their justification for charging higher premiums.

But I think it's just as unfair to discriminate based on wealth (ie posher area/having off road parking) as it is to discriminate on gender (mainly because anyone looking to nick a car knows better than to try to nick em from the poor estates )
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silverchaired1
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#55
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#55
(Original post by theycallmemrpig)
get a mk3 golf for around 2500,

spend 500 kitting it up, like a good sound system etc

there u go.............sorted

That's EXACTLY what I've got..you can't f*cking beat 'em! Golf's are the way to go, you just can't go wrong.

I've got a mrk3, M reg golf, it's a 1.9 TDI and I bought it after I'd only had my licence one month. I tell ya, the insurance wasn't pretty (only about £100 more expensive than a 1.1 ****ty fiesta).

god...I love golfs so much.
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