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    Not aiming to be offensive just curious but do fully blind people dream in pictures? Or sounds?

    I mean can people imagine colours and images if they've never seen them?

    I don't know where this thought came from...
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    I read somewhere that if the person has been totally blind all their life, they only dream in sounds/smells. Stands to reason really. I suppose if they started out partially sighted, then even when they went completely blind then they might still dream that they could see, for a while anyway.
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    you should read the story of helen keller, it gives a really great account of what it's like to be blind deaf and mute. ive always wondered, if you dont know what words are, then how do you think? it sounds terrible, but like if you've never heard any words, and dont know that everything has a name, and have never seen said things so you cant even visualise them, what's it like thinking? is it kindof in concepts or what???
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    How did she write this account? I'm intrigued and will probably see if I can get hold of it. I had a discussion before and I thought, surely if you were born deaf, blind and dumb you wouldn't be able to be taught any from of communication?
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    (Original post by what_a_shambles)
    Not aiming to be offensive just curious but do fully blind people dream in pictures? Or sounds?

    I mean can people imagine colours and images if they've never seen them?

    I don't know where this thought came from...
    This is a question I've always wanted an answer for, it baffles me

    I'm also confused on how blind and deaf people learn to communicate because they can't anything you put in front of them (ie. written instructions) but they also can't hear you so you can't tell them any instructions.... :confused:
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    (Original post by Kate85)
    This is a question I've always wanted an answer for, it baffles me

    I'm also confused on how blind and deaf people learn to communicate because they can't anything you put in front of them (ie. written instructions) but they also can't hear you so you can't tell them any instructions.... :confused:
    Its called Braille. Its the way blind people can read and write.
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    (Original post by Dude)
    Its called Braille. Its the way blind people can read and write.
    But to be fair, Helen Keller was blind and deaf, therefore she had more difficulty learning what braille was.
    (i.e. "Helen, this set of bumps is an A. Helen! HELEN? Are you listening?")
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    im sure i read sumwhere that people communicated with her by a type of sign language where they kind of traced things on her hand...could be wrong tho...
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    i think it is quite patronising to say that blind and deaf people wouldn't be able to understand what language was. we do have more senses than blind people, but here's a question:

    When you were born, did you have language? No. How did you learn language? Just by listening to people talking. In the same way, I think a blind and deaf person can learn just by touch, smell and taste just as we learn a first language by hearing it.
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    (Original post by thatguy)
    i think it is quite patronising to say that blind and deaf people wouldn't be able to understand what language was. we do have more senses than blind people, but here's a question:

    When you were born, did you have language? No. How did you learn language? Just by listening to people talking. In the same way, I think a blind and deaf person can learn just by touch, smell and taste just as we learn a first language by hearing it.
    True, but their language would be so alien to ours we could never understand it.
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    im sure i read sumwhere that people communicated with her by a type of sign language where they kind of traced things on her hand...could be wrong tho...
    True. They traced images on her hand and then she felt the thing they were tracing, e.g water etc.
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    (Original post by Poica)
    But to be fair, Helen Keller was blind and deaf, therefore she had more difficulty learning what braille was.
    (i.e. "Helen, this set of bumps is an A. Helen! HELEN? Are you listening?")
    :toofunny:
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    (Original post by thatguy)
    i think it is quite patronising to say that blind and deaf people wouldn't be able to understand what language was. we do have more senses than blind people, but here's a question:

    When you were born, did you have language? No. How did you learn language? Just by listening to people talking. In the same way, I think a blind and deaf person can learn just by touch, smell and taste just as we learn a first language by hearing it.
    I didn't have a language, but I could see the things people were talking about and relate them. Also, everyone I saw was communication a language I could detect so could pick it up. Only a tiny proportion of people would communicate with her in a way she could pick up. With just touch, and smell/taste, which are very unrelated, I find it difficult to comprehend how you would say "this is an apple, the word/sign for it is....". I presume she did learn, which is why I asked how she did, I'm intrigued to see how she overcame it. Niaeve, perhaps. Patronising, I don't think so.
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    :eek: We were talkinga bout this in psychology yesterday. I think blind people do have 'visual' dreams but with just colours.

    It's interesting how blind people know when to sleep without light cues (zeitgebers). Miles (1977) documented a man who was blind from birth, he had a strong 24.9hr circadian (daily) rhythm despite the fact he was exposed to zeitgebers like clocks and radios. His biological clock was so strong they had to use stimulants and sedatives to coordinate his sleep/wake cycle with the rest of the world, this suggests light is the dominant zeitgeber.

    If you were blind and deaf you'd learn by touch, you'd probably have a guide dog. I remember being told one could put their hands to someone's neck as they spoke and learn what the vibrations meant. If however you suddenly became deaf and blind, hopefully you could still speak (even though you can't hear yourself or others) and then using that limited form of communication you'd have to learn to use braile. :s:

    A guy who was paralysed and deaf wrote a book by moving his eyes to look at the letters he wanted to type- he had some sort of microchip in his eye I think? :cool:
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    (Original post by Poica)
    But to be fair, Helen Keller was blind and deaf, therefore she had more difficulty learning what braille was.
    (i.e. "Helen, this set of bumps is an A. Helen! HELEN? Are you listening?")
    This is what I was talking about, I wasn't just refering blind people...I know they use Braille :rolleyes:
    I meant how do you tell a person who can't see and can't hear that you are going to teach them something? Precisly what Poica was talking about
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    (Original post by Kate85)
    This is what I was talking about, I wasn't just refering blind people...I know they use Braille :rolleyes:
    I meant how do you tell a person who can't see and can't hear that you are going to teach them something? Precisly what Poica was talking about
    If they are allowed to touch words written in braille and then the objects that relate to them, they should start to learn those words, despite them not knowing how they sound, or even what sound is. The thing is, I think that blind and deaf people from birth don't know what they are missing, so are probably just as content as everyone else.
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    I thought maybe they do see images but i'm not sure thats bugging me now :confused: xxxx
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    Apparently...

    Blind People DO dream...
    http://van.hep.uiuc.edu/van/qa/secti.../983040715.htm
    --------
    There are no visual images in the dreams of those born without any ability to experience visual imagery in waking life.

    Individuals who become blind before the age of five seldom experience visual imagery in their dreams, although Deutsch (1928) reports some visual imagery in six schoolchildren who lost their sight before age five.

    Those who become sightless between the ages of five and seven may or may not retain some visual imagery.

    Most people who lost their vision after age seven continue to experience at least some visual imagery, although its frequency and clarity often fade with time.

    http://psych.ucsc.edu/dreams/Library...itz_1999a.html
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    This is a bit off topic, but not by far so I'll ask anyway :flutter:

    I wondered how red-green colour blind people would know that they were red-green colourblind if they'd been it all their life? I mean...they would see a colour and learn it to be 'red' so whether it is or not to you and me is irrelevant. Like they could see 'red' at a traffic lights as what we see 'green' as...but then who knows that what we see is the same was what everyone else does?

    I know you can do brain scanning and imaging techniques to determine colour blindeness, but what I mean is...HOW does someone realise themselves that they're colour blind, when they've been it all their lives? I mean there could be people going around not suspecting a thing....hmmmm I shouldn't think so much, it will get me into trouble and might make me lose a brain cell, thus making my remaining one be lonely.
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    (Original post by Gem)
    This is a bit off topic, but not by far so I'll ask anyway :flutter:

    I wondered how red-green colour blind people would know that they were red-green colourblind if they'd been it all their life? I mean...they would see a colour and learn it to be 'red' so whether it is or not to you and me is irrelevant. Like they could see 'red' at a traffic lights as what we see 'green' as...but then who knows that what we see is the same was what everyone else does?

    I know you can do brain scanning and imaging techniques to determine colour blindeness, but what I mean is...HOW does someone realise themselves that they're colour blind, when they've been it all their lives? I mean there could be people going around not suspecting a thing....hmmmm I shouldn't think so much, it will get me into trouble and might make me lose a brain cell, thus making my remaining one be lonely.
    You'd think it's normal, then you'll one day twig it's not, I reckon. Why I think that:
    I have really bad hearing in one ear, but the other's fine so no-one knows unless I tell them. Infact I passed all the hearing tests you have when you're a baby [even tho i was born with this]. Infact I had extra tests aged about 4 and I got through them too. :rolleyes:

    My first memory of realisation dates back to when I was three years old! We were visiting the Mary Rose and they had information phones that told us about it...I realised I couldn't hear out of one ear, but I just assumed it was normal, I thought everyone was like that- I thought people had one good ear that they always used on the phone!:rolleyes: It was only when I was about eight that I realised this wasn't normal, and got myself to the audiologist.
 
 
 
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