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    (Original post by Mismatched_dollie_pepper)
    Out of curiosity, what were your friends gcse's like? and also their AS grades? did they have quite significant experience?
    1 A*, 3 or 4 As and the rest Bs and Cs. She got 3Bs and a C in AS levels, then boosted it up with module resits. Yea, but work experience isn't too bad to come by, try and get a voluntary placement somewhere, then you've got an ID badge which you can use to persuade lots of important people that you deserve to be given a chance...
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    (Original post by mclovin123)
    On tax benefits, went to terrible inner city chav infested ****hole, live in a terrible crime ridden part of my city, would this cut it?
    Yeah, that sounds about right, you should be fine on that criteria which I know that Soton has for example. http://www.medschools.ac.uk/Students...ical-year.aspx
    That's a list for you, I know Lancaster has access places that were still available in extra but I don't know how good it is and how many people get into med schools after that. A sux year might be your best bet to save the hassle of re-applying. Basically you need to work really hard from now whilst trawling TSR and the net for info about your options.

    All the best, again - I know how daunting the whole process can be let alone if you're grades aren't the best - make sure you sort work exp too so you can demonstrate an informed decision.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Only the middle one really, the other two are unfortunate but certainly not excuses IMO. And you've said yourself that a lot of it is down to lack of effort. It's good that you're determined, but you really do need to research and apply tactically.
    Yeh i know my work rate has gotten alot beter over the easter hols tho, and i was talking to soton on the phone and they said that tax benefits and bad eria make me eligable to apply for a widening acces course along with the bad school. Those are the three main criteria i was told.
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    (Original post by BeanofJelly)
    But why? If the reason for your bad grades is because you dislike academic study, memorising a lot of stuff, and having to do exams - it's not so much that you can't do medicine but why would you want to?

    There aren't many other careers that will involve so many exams and so much learning.

    Just make sure you're not so desperate to do it because of some dreamy/naive/want to be like the TV doctors reason. Have you any work experience?

    But.. if there is some other reason why you have done badly (well relatively for medicine) then press ahead! I see in some of your posts you sound quite dedicated/determined.

    My post is not intended to be mean, just advisory - you wouldn't be a bad or inferior person if medicine weren't for you, but it would be a shame if it wasn't for you and you remained incorrectly convinced that it was, for naive reasons - then leading to rejection or worse, failure at medical school or beyond.
    I have done alot of experience both in hospitals and practices. Quite a few family members are docs or medics so i have been fully filled in on the reality of being a doctor. I have been told the horror storys, the long hours, the pressure, ect. I dont wanna be a doc cuz i have seen house and scrubs lol i really want to do it for the job itself. I have done badly because of a lack of effort. I had the dream of wanting to be a doctor but the reailty has not really sunk in till recently. I just did not know the work it entailed to get their ect but recently i have actually realised the work i will have to commit if it is ever going to happen. Its late but not impossible. I have been working so hard to get good AS Grades and i really hope i do well, i am fully commited to this now. Thanks for the advice tho, i completly understand why most people have this response to my situation .
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    (Original post by mclovin123)
    Yeh i know my work rate has gotten alot beter over the easter hols tho, and i was talking to soton on the phone and they said that tax benefits and bad eria make me eligable to apply for a widening acces course along with the bad school. Those are the three main criteria i was told.
    As eligibility criteria for a foundation course, perhaps. Not, I would say, to use as "reasons" why you should get special consideration for a normal course.
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    Just to quickly let you know, UEA doesn't need Chemistry.
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    (Original post by Beska)
    I'd be as brass to say they are significantly below-average tbh.
    You are obviously not living in the real world. Some of you are being way too harsh. And being a good doctor is as much about having the personality as the knowledge, so if I were you I'd work on that.
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    (Original post by jessica.thomas)
    You are obviously not living in the real world. Some of you are being way too harsh. And being a good doctor is as much about having the personality as the knowledge, so if I were you I'd work on that.
    Surely that depends o.o

    A surgeons attitude is surely far less important than his knowledge of the body :eek:

    Tbf I think they were trying to be honest and comparatively they may not be the best for medicine :|

    In the real world people with 10+ A* get rejected from medicine so I wouldn't say it is that unfair
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    (Original post by Davidragon)
    Surely that depends o.o

    A surgeons attitude is surely far less important than his knowledge of the body :eek:

    Tbf I think they were trying to be honest and comparatively they may not be the best for medicine :|

    In the real world people with 10+ A* get rejected from medicine so I wouldn't say it is that unfair
    I would say that they are both extremely important. The idea that the majority of surgeons have no people skills and all drive porches is far from the truth.

    You need to have a good knowledge/skills base and excellent communication skills to succeed in any field of clinical medicine. Having the right attitude to patients, to the paper work and to their colleagues is essential.
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    (Original post by mclovin123)
    blabla
    Okay. Sorry for having a go

    You're only at AS level, you have plenty of time to sort this out. One of the things I feel I have learnt at medschool, is that I (and presumably a lot of other people therefore) have a propensity for hard work and sustained cramming that I hadn't imagined possible in sixth form. If it's not impossible for me to pass my summer exams at medschool (fingers crossed eh), it's not impossible for you to entirely turn around your A levels

    If you apply tactically, there should be medschools that will accept your GCSEs. They aren't that bad. I don't know too much about it but you could look here.

    Chemistry is more of a problem but not an impossible one. Given that AS are almost over, I don't rate your chances of learning the syllabus by yourself and succeeding in external exams this summer. BUT.. you could consider the following options from here:

    Take AS level chemistry at your college/sixth form next year alongside your A-levels. If you can persuade your HOY that is, that way you can have lessons and sit externally.

    If you can't take AS level next year internally, then use this summer to start work on it and get to trying to sit it as external candidate in January next year (or earlier, don't know if possible). Just buy the textbook your exam board uses and learn it. It can be a little medschool taster for you :rolleyes:
    If you get an A in the AS chemistry in January or earlier, it will free up may revision time for your other subjects, if not - well May is another chance.

    Even if medschools don't want to look at you because you won't have the AS when you apply, the fees are going to be £9,000 regardless so if you have to take a gap year it's not so bad (more work experience to help make up for those GCSEs, I recommend working as an HCA). Just important to get all your A levels plus AS chemistry done within 2 years.

    A lot of medschools don't require chemistry.. so you might think why not just apply to them and don't bother with the AS? I would tread carefully because that leaves you with 3 A levels and no AS, and I don't honestly know how that is viewed. If you are going to have to take another AS, why not make it chemistry and have a wider choice, especially given your GCSEs.

    Anyway, hope this helps. You have a problem but I don't think it's huge. If, you are as hard working and dedicated as you claim
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    (Original post by TooSexyForMyStethoscope)
    I would say that they are both extremely important. The idea that the majority of surgeons have no people skills and all drive porches is far from the truth.

    You need to have a good knowledge/skills base and excellent communication skills to succeed in any field of clinical medicine. Having the right attitude to patients, to the paper work and to their colleagues is essential.
    I'm not trying to play on a stereotype when I say that but, in the context of their job (primarily in healing the patient), a surgeons knowledge of medicine is more important than how friendly they are. I'm saying their actions based on their knowledge of medicine have a much more profound effect (generally) on the patient than their attitude compared to specialities like Paediatrics and Psychiatry. Also, in areas like Pathology I can't imagine personality matters as much as knowledge.
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    (Original post by Davidragon)
    I'm not trying to play on a stereotype when I say that but, in the context of their job a surgeons knowledge of medicine is more important than how friendly they are. I'm saying their actions based on their knowledge of medicine have a much more profound effect (generally) on the patient than their attitude compared to specialities like Paediatrics and Psychiatry. Also, in areas like Pathology I can't imagine personality matters as much as knowledge.
    What about a paediatric surgeon? :p:

    Seriously though, surgeons talk to patients too, imo it's really important that they have a decent bedside manner too.
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    wow so many negative and usupportive comments about his grades...

    It will be very hard for you but if that's what you want to do then don't let these people stop you!
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    OP's GCSEs aren't horrendous, he still got mostly B's, surely that would suffice for most med schools bar Birmingham, Oxford, Kings and a couple of others.
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    (Original post by jessica.thomas)
    You are obviously not living in the real world. Some of you are being way too harsh. And being a good doctor is as much about having the personality as the knowledge, so if I were you I'd work on that.
    The real world has absolutely nothing to do with medicine admissions.

    Those GCSE's are significantly below average. I'm sorry if this doesn't fit into some kind of politically correct category, but fact is fact.

    You're harping on at me about how I'll be bad a bad doctor because I'm telling the truth? Okay!
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    (Original post by Davidragon)
    I'm not trying to play on a stereotype when I say that but, in the context of their job (primarily in healing the patient), a surgeons knowledge of medicine is more important than how friendly they are. I'm saying their actions based on their knowledge of medicine have a much more profound effect (generally) on the patient than their attitude compared to specialities like Paediatrics and Psychiatry. Also, in areas like Pathology I can't imagine personality matters as much as knowledge.
    Obviously if you are forcing me to choose then of course the medical skills and knowledge are what directly help the patient. But the original point was about attitude a good one will mean that you might pay more attention to the patient's feelings (which won't stop the bleeding I know) but will help them. I don't want to get bogged down in this...

    The OP will need to prove both academic ability and personality You need both to get in.
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    I think you could quite easily cope if you couldn't get an A in Maths, as 1) it is medicine, and not maths or maths related to any significant degree 2) the degree is difficult insofar as it is strenuous in workload, which is different from its content being difficult to understand.
    Well if I get three A's then I will definitely think about reapplying next year, providing my I'm told I don't have to make my place at Loughborough. However, even if I do get three A's, I'm still not sure it would be worth the risk of applying again next year. I guess it depends how much I want it.

    The word 'can't' implies that it was physically impossible for you to achieve an A o.o I think that is a bit harsh on yourself, 'didn't' seems better. Exam results are important but I wouldn't go as far to say previous exam results wholly define what a person is academically capable of in the future. Even the best psychometric tests today don't really gauge someone's true intellectual potential.
    Haha thanks, although I did say 'don't think I can', not can't! However the last thing I would want would to do would be to end up taking a gap year, going to med school school and failing my exams
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    (Original post by Jonnislats)
    Well if I get three A's then I will definitely think about reapplying next year, providing my I'm told I don't have to make my place at Loughborough. However, even if I do get three A's, I'm still not sure it would be worth the risk of applying again next year. I guess it depends how much I want it.



    Haha thanks, although I did say 'don't think I can', not can't! However the last thing I would want would to do would be to end up taking a gap year, going to med school school and failing my exams
    Yeah, I get what you mean. As lazy as I am I don't think my ego could cope with doing badly. However, I know people (very talented people) who take knocks way to hard, for example if they mess up an exam, and sometimes make themselves believe they are a lot less able than they are. It's often the case that you believe in your peers more than they believe in themselves
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    (Original post by jessica.thomas)
    Just to quickly let you know, UEA doesn't need Chemistry.
    Their GCSE results aren't good enough for UEA
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    Grades are only half the battle when it comes to becoming a doctor. Your passion has to be there also. And by the sounds of things you have the passion! Ok so your grades aren't the stereotypical medicine grades but so what. You got to fight for your dream!

    I told my careers teacher I wanted to do medicine after I got my gcse results and she laughed in my face and said I should just do nursing. I got 1A*, 4 A's and 4 B's. Cut a story short. I have an offer for medicine with pre medical studies year, access to medicine course and waiting for a decision on medicine with foundation year. Not bad for someone who could only do nursing.

    So yeah fight for it! Show everyone that you CAN do it! Believe me you get your passion across and you will succeed! Get your head down for a levels and it will all pay off
 
 
 
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