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Status Symbols of the British Upper Middle Class watch

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    Yes, I'm well aware of that. However, many sociologists are leaning to the idea that Britain's middle class are dividing, and it is not necessarily along the lines of occupational prestige and educational background. In other words, the British class system is becoming more 'American'.

    For instance, let's take the role of a lecturer of history at a Russell Group university. Very impressive, very prestigious. Now, until about 20-30 years ago, the vast amount of people who held such a position, while not earning high salaries themselves, came from moneyed backgrounds that would easily let them enjoy the prestige and lifestyle of any other middle-class profession or even upper class gentleman or lady. The same could be said of vicars and military officers. There salaries were and are today stil relatively low, but their status in society is high.

    However, such professions have since become more democratised, and the middle and upper classes no longer dominate them. Working class kids who were educated at grammar schools often joined their ranks, and they stand out from the old guard.

    Now, along with this came a super escalation in salaries, bonuses and compensation amongst people who work in the financial sector in the City. Their salaries put them way above most surgeons, lawyers, judges, academics, top level civil servants, etc. Because of their wealth, their lifestyles were clearly not middle class anymore, yet they still eschewed middle class values. This was a different phenomenon than the old rags to riches new money type of thing. It made the old British class system seem irrelevant, particularly when you see the working-class eroding into a working poor and a few lucky ones climbing up to the lower middle-class.

    Thus, the term middle-class has become just as meaningless as working-class. Income now has to play a larger role than it did before when determining class. And the concept of what we once called middle class also had to be reconstructed to signify those with money--a lot of money--but not titled or aristocratic, and those with postgraduate degrees in the professions.
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    (Original post by Renal)
    A mortgage, savings and their own car.
    Lol u mad? Everyone has savings, nearly everyone owns a car and most people have a mortgage? Your statement might have been true 40 years ago....we're talking about the upper middle class here.
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    Money, pretension, snobbery, nepotism.
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    Fred Perry bags
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    Money, pretension, snobbery, nepotism.
    Bit of an offensive generalisation there.
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    Membership at a gentleman's club.
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    Bit of an offensive generalisation there.
    Okay okay, I'll dial the prejudice down a bit:

    Money.
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    Gangsta houses and gangsta ho's.
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    Exclusive gym membership, private-schooled children, jobs in medicine/law, detached homes in pretty suburbs, 2 or more expensive cars, 3-4 holidays abroad annually, sometimes have cleaners, gardners.

    Good for them I say.
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    Money, pretension, snobbery, nepotism.
    Agreed, completely.
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    More than one car, at least two holidays a year and well-educated children
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    Pure blood as well.
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    (Original post by Renal)
    Disagree, the professional class are far less likely to go on holiday several times a year, they work after all and tend to take it seriously.
    Disagree with the disagree. Most people get holiday, and professionals are far more likely to go on holiday than the working class because they can afford it (presuming upper middle class are richer, which they normally are.) Working class cannot afford exotic holidays as much e.g. skiing not benidorm.
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    Money, pretension, snobbery, nepotism.
    The last three are hallmarks of trade unionists.
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    (Original post by OmnipotentOmelette)
    Disagree with the disagree. Most people get holiday, and professionals are far more likely to go on holiday than the working class because they can afford it (presuming upper middle class are richer, which they normally are.) Working class cannot afford exotic holidays as much e.g. skiing not benidorm.
    I'm not convinced that this is true, in terms of disposable cash, I don't think there's that much difference.
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    (Original post by Clip)
    The last three are hallmarks of trade unionists.
    That has to be the most hilariously incorrect thing I've ever heard.
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    (Original post by AP1989)
    Pure blood as well.
    What is this Harry Potter?! :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by SophiaKeuning)
    Agreed, completely.
    People are being rather judgemental here. :lolwut:
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    (Original post by U.S Lecce)
    A lot of things that are regarded middle class are very much working class aswell. i.e I'm probably working class, but i go on exotic holidays. One of my parents has a degree, the other is in a managerial posistion. I live in a nice area but in a small 3 bed semi (and the surrounding areas are pretty rough). I think what makes me working class is that i live in a one parent house (my mum). And despite having a degree, doesn't make a huge amount of money. She also has a crap car and can't really afford loads of nice things. But our habbits are middle class or "cultured"(apart from her excessive drinking). However i think it's only because she grew up in a fairly well off family.
    My dad on the other hand is fairly middle class, but i don't live with him permanently.
    Now, I would probably call you middle class. Or lower-middle. Just saying that because I am basically in the intentical situation - two parents, one with a degree, other mangerial position, live with mum who doesn't earn much and have no financial support from dad, we have a very crap car that barely manages a month without a breakdown but still try and get an exotic holiday a year. But I think, regardless of income, I'm middle class because we do things like go to the theatre regularly/read classics or sunday papers together/she takes an active interest in my education etc, and I think it's those sort of things which define it far more than our income,
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    (Original post by .Ali.)
    People are being rather judgemental here. :lolwut:

    Yeah, quite cruel I suppose. People are also saying positive things, so it's all in good nature. I was merely agreeing with possible negatives that come with being an upper middle class person.
 
 
 
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