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    Currently this is my daily plan:
    Come home from school, do homework then type up a 'mini-textbook' kind of thing for each subject attended to on that day. Basically they are high-level descriptions of key concepts done in that lesson, one chapter per week of notes. - This usually takes me about 2 hours & 30 minutes on average (including homework).

    Saturday: Re-type each chapter for each subject to test if I actually understood the information, then look back to the original chapter, it doesn't have to be EXACT wording just underlining key concepts, ideas, connections etc.

    Do a few pages of past papers for bio, chem, physics & history. Then do some practice questions for math. - Time to do all this varies from time to time.

    I'm thinking of recording mini-lectures of summarised information instead of typing up the mini-textbook as I am an auditory learner, although I am capable of learning visually. What do you think, is this too much or is it ideal?
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    Are you sitting any exams early? Otherwise that is a bit too much for my standards.
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    Doesn't seem necessary for GCSE, but I guess you'll have a walk in the park when you don't need to do any more revision when it comes to exams next year. There's no need to let yourself do too much though.

    I guess you want to do medicine(from your name), so remember they want well rounded people - make sure you have enough time to have a life. At this age especially, thats pretty importnat.
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    What?!?
    KEY CONCEPTS ? This is GCSE. You need to chill out and relax, what you're doing atm is what people studying a level should be doing.

    Also, mini-textbook?
    Wow...
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    (Original post by FutureMedicalDoctor)
    Currently this is my daily plan:
    Come home from school, do homework then type up a 'mini-textbook' kind of thing for each subject attended to on that day. Basically they are high-level descriptions of key concepts done in that lesson, one chapter per week of notes. - This usually takes me about 2 hours & 30 minutes on average (including homework).

    Saturday: Re-type each chapter for each subject to test if I actually understood the information, then look back to the original chapter, it doesn't have to be EXACT wording just underlining key concepts, ideas, connections etc.

    Do a few pages of past papers for bio, chem, physics & history. Then do some practice questions for math. - Time to do all this varies from time to time.

    I'm thinking of recording mini-lectures of summarised information instead of typing up the mini-textbook as I am an auditory learner, although I am capable of learning visually. What do you think, is this too much or is it ideal?
    Definitely isn't necessary. A lot of people only starting working properly for A level. However if you do think this helps and would prefer to do this to make sure you get good grades, then go for it. However if its making you miserable doing this then just tone it down and do some work next year when your actual exams are
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    Bloody hell :| For god sake, relax and enjoy your life
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    GCSE is a walk in the park. Just wait till A level or even University..
    It will come in useful then!

    But if your comfortable with what you are doing then go for it! At least it will help leading up to university.
    But personally, I wouldn't do all that, I would briefly look over what I did in the week on the weekend.
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    get out of the house. you'll burn out too fast and you're only in year 10.
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    Definitely too much I don't do that much year round revision for uni. Are you sure it's actually benefitting you? I can't remember GCSEs having enough content to be able to write that much. You may find you burn out before exam time.
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    (Original post by FutureMedicalDoctor)
    Do a few pages of past papers for bio, chem, physics & history. Then do some practice questions for math. - Time to do all this varies from time to time.

    I'd advise to save most of the past papers until just before the real exams come up. There is after all a limited amount of past papers. I found with my science GCSEs that I had done all the past papers 3 months before the exams, and a few weeks before I tried going over them again and found that I knew the answers not by figuring it out but by remembering the correct answers from when I last did the past paper. As a result I didn't really know how I was progressing, which defied the entire point of doing past papers (I got As in the end though). I guess if you're fortunate you may not remember the answers to past papers you did a few months ago, and maybe its just me having a knack for remembering seemingly unimportant facts.
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    This is what I do my Alevels, except I don't take as long or repeat it...
    For GCSEs it seems a bit much, especially for yr10 if your exams are going to be next year.

    However if it makes you feel happy about your workload- I can't cope with my alevels unless I do all this too and feel really stressed if I don't- then carry on. It'll make your GCSE revision later easier and less stressed.
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    Seems too much for Year 10.

    Since you want to do medicine, you want to get work experience, i.e. shadowing doctors, volunteering at a local care home, etc. By trying to get a taste of what working in a hospital/GP role/etc. is like you will certainly impress universities as they will realise that you really want it.
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    For year 10? **** yes it's too much, too much for A levels rediculous for GCSEs. Most people don't even really revise for GCSEs. Chill out a bit, if you get too used to needing to work so hard just to handle the material you wont fair well when it actually gets challanging.

    Channel that energy somewhere it matters, get some work experience or something. Nobody will give 2 ****s about your GCSEs and if anything working so hard for them only undermines what grades you get out
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    Way too much. Considering you want to do medicine, better uses of your time would be to start volunteering now, and start looking into developing your knowledge of the NHS in the UK.
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    That is alot, I would say it's fine and will assure you do well, but I would say constantly make sure if you want to do something else let yourself, because you are doing alot!
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    I don't think I've ever met anyone who does that much work until the second year of uni.
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    Can I ask why you're working so hard? Are you at a rubbishy school or something? Do you not trust your teachers? (not a criticism, I'm just interested )
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    The word 'keen' comes to mind.
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    (Original post by twelve)
    Doesn't seem necessary for GCSE, but I guess you'll have a walk in the park when you don't need to do any more revision when it comes to exams next year. There's no need to let yourself do too much though.

    I guess you want to do medicine(from your name), so remember they want well rounded people - make sure you have enough time to have a life. At this age especially, thats pretty importnat.
    Who says "having a life" is important? What would you define as "having a life"?
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Who says "having a life" is important? What would you define as "having a life"?
    Toss off. You know the answer to that question.

    OP, although your organisational skills are useful and will almost certainly come in handy (especially if you want to study Medicine at uni) but right now you are still young. Enjoy yourself. GCSEs are far from difficult if you have any shred of intelligence which it sounds like you do. I say, relax a bit - it's important for you to have a balance of work and play otherwise you might well burn out.

    However when all is said and done, it's your life and if you are happy in your current routine then who am I to say otherwise?
 
 
 
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