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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Excuse me?

    Who are you to criticise how other people lead their lives? Also, how do you you exactly KNOW that they feel it "isn't enough"?
    I don't KNOW, but I'm sure if I asked 100 people whether they'd rather be a hermit, but REALLY clever, or just clever and actually have friends and hobbies, 99 people would say the latter.

    I'm not criticising anybody's life, I'm just saying that I personally would hate that kind of life. I would feel selfish, lonely and unfulfilled. I'm not going to recommend to the OP that they stay in forever and unless they get straight A*'s at GCSE they are a failure, when I don't believe it.
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    I don't think it's necessary! I didn't do nearly as much as that and came out with 9A*s last year, just work consistently hard in lessons, do all of the work set and make sure you have a decent grasp of what you're being taught. If it's anything like my experience, you'll have plenty of time to focus on revision from about this time next year, and as long as you've paid attention, you'll be fine!
    Nevertheless, if it makes you feel comfortable then by all means continue, but I'd advise relaxing a bit whilst you can, as A levels certainly do require more work!
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    Enjoy your free time before you get to A level and above, when you will actually need to be working hard. TBH, even if you do try this I reckon you'd burn out in a week or two.
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    I admire your level of motivation (I really wish I was more motivated), but you don't need to work that hard for GCSEs! Although it is your life and if you don't mind putting in that amount of work that I guess that's fine. You'll probably get awesome grades! Be careful you don't burn yourself out though. It's important to have some time to relax and enjoy yourself.
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    im doing igcse. I do more work, so no. Your doing fine
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    Far too much. GCSE's are just about 'walk in' exams. A-levels take a little bit more work but thay are NO WHERE NEAR hard enough to need all that work.
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    Jesus christ, chill out, you can do well at GCSE with practically no work, save this amount of work for your A-levels
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    Yeah, it deffo is wayy too much.

    I barely revised much in year 10, only started revision like 1 week before the actual exam, and mainly got B's. btw in year 11 mock exams I always some crap grade (such as an E) for history as I never paid attention, I started revising for history 2 days before the actual summer exam, covered the whole aqa revision guide spec in just two days, and got a B in that aswell.

    Im not saying follow what I did (that was really bad!) but if I was you i'd go home and go over what was covered in lesson that day and make sure I know it; all the way to the end of the specification at the pace of you being taught by your teachers. You should end up with a couple of months remaining for the exams when you finish the spec, then you can cover the spec again at home to really meld it all in.
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    I myself am jealous that I can't seem to put in that amount of effort. So for that, good on you!

    My school, a public secondary school, advises that I revise 2-3 hours a day. Now, I don't get anywhere near it... I get 2 minutes whilst walking down the corridor to the class/hall that I'm getting an exam in.

    For those comments that said about having a life; I know a lot of people that would rather spend every minute they have free on the Xbox. At least his actions are constructive compared to 4pm to 3am or longer on the Xbox with only small breaks.
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    another case of the good old 'wasted life' scenario

    on the plus side, rated for your commitment.
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    What's this obsession everyone seems to have with "having a life". That is one of the most annoying colloquial terms anyway. What good will "having a life" do him. It is good that you are working hard now seeing as you want to go into medicine. And if you want to be a good, dedicated doctor you will probably spend every waking moment working hard in future anyway. Most people can't understand that level of drive and commitment because they don't have anything they really want to do or don't think they can achieve their goals and therefore they become unmotivated, using the cliche "enjoying life" argument as a front for their loss of motivation and their broken dreams. So keep working hard, unless of course you think it likely that you will burn out in which case you are probably not cut out for medicine anyway.

    Also, definitely save the past papers until the end. For now, do questions from the textbook or try and get your teacher to put together some questions for you each lesson. It does sound like the amount of work you are doing may not be completely necessary for GCSE (particularly for somebody like you who sounds intelligent) so you should maybe start doing A level work in your spare time for the courses you want to take to get a head start and read some books about medicine. Just type 'medicine' into Amazon and loads of good stuff comes up.
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    My advice is to enjoy your life until your education begins in a few years.
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    The 2010 Legatum Prosperity Index ranks the US as first in terms of healthcare by a fairly significant margin.

    http://www.prosperity.com/health.aspx
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    (Original post by Mike Johnston)
    What's this obsession everyone seems to have with "having a life". That is one of the most annoying colloquial terms anyway. What good will "having a life" do him. It is good that you are working hard now seeing as you want to go into medicine. And if you want to be a good, dedicated doctor you will probably spend every waking moment working hard in future anyway. Most people can't understand that level of drive and commitment because they don't have anything they really want to do or don't think they can achieve their goals and therefore they become unmotivated, using the cliche "enjoying life" argument as a front for their loss of motivation and their broken dreams. So keep working hard, unless of course you think it likely that you will burn out in which case you are probably not cut out for medicine anyway.

    Also, definitely save the past papers until the end. For now, do questions from the textbook or try and get your teacher to put together some questions for you each lesson. It does sound like the amount of work you are doing may not be completely necessary for GCSE (particularly for somebody like you who sounds intelligent) so you should maybe start doing A level work in your spare time for the courses you want to take to get a head start and read some books about medicine. Just type 'medicine' into Amazon and loads of good stuff comes up.
    Agreed.

    One of the worst phrases there is. :facepalm2:
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    GCSEs? Blimey.

    I think its good that you seem committed however I'd enjoy yourself a bit more while you can! Don't spend so much time on it, but do keep in some sort of routine because it will help when you start A-levels and you do need that kind of revision.

    Seriously though, you're 15 or so? Go out and enjoy yourself after school. GCSEs are pretty much the last year before life starts getting ****.
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    At GCSEs, you should only really be working hard if you're of below-average intelligence. Many find that even if they don't listen in class and don't pay attention, they get As for their tests. These types of people just need to work a tiny little bit to push that to an A*. OP, if you find that you are already the head of the class without doing all this, then doing this will really just push you too far - after all you only need so much to get an A*, an examiner can't give you a grade higher than that. I often like to think I'm one of these people, heh but I'm an arrogant **** XD

    If you find that you get mostly Bs and Cs, and aren't at all intellectually special, then working hard is what will get you an A*. To be honest, I consider myself a tiny bit above average, and I manage As in half the subjects I do, with minimal effort. It wasn't until recently that I started actually listening in class - thats when I started getting A*s on a regular basis.

    I find lots of people on TSR are of above-average talent, as opposed to many of my peers. Its very hard to judge intelligence, and there's always something arbitrary about it, but you can easily determine if you're bright or not.
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    (Original post by Gromit94)
    Can I ask why you're working so hard? Are you at a rubbishy school or something? Do you not trust your teachers? (not a criticism, I'm just interested )
    I'm at a school where I missed out a whole year on the majority of topics. My previous one was crap. I'm trying to catch up.
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    (Original post by LeeC)
    Not necessary, if you are so keen on learning, start something more worthwhile, like reading books to expand your knowledge. This is overkill for GCSE level!
    What type of books in particular?
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    (Original post by Mike Johnston)
    so you should maybe start doing A level work in your spare time for the courses you want to take to get a head start and read some books about medicine. Just type 'medicine' into Amazon and loads of good stuff comes up.
    Thanks for the advice. By the 'A Level work', what exactly do you mean? Reading A Level textbooks? :confused: Some have said that GCSE science is dumbed down so I might actually end up getting marked wrong if I put A Level answers, I think the syllabuses are different aswell. Thanks though
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    (Original post by FutureMedicalDoctor)
    What type of books in particular?
    Well I guess you want to be a doctor. Relevant books could be anything from A-Level Biology/Chemistry/Physics or Maths textbooks (though it really isn't worth anything more than a quick flick through yet, if you are going to do any proper learning you might as well do it for your GCSEs) but I'd reccomend you look up some popular science books in this area, 'Medicine for Dummies' type stuff (I'm not sure if that book exists), but just really basic stuff to start off with. I'm sure you could understand more, but it's supposed to be for fun and to have some good background reading, not just for getting ahead of the game, which will stress you out and distract you from your GCSEs. I'm sure some medecine people could direct you to some good books.
 
 
 

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