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    I want to spend the entire year up till next summer learning maths in my own time. I can’t enrol to any classes due to my job. The fact that there is clearly a massive amount of unemployment means that I won’t risk quitting this job until I can enroll into college. Also I can’t afford a maths tutor to teach me.

    This means that I have to learn in my own time by books. I want to be able to learn Calculus, Trig, mechanics and Algebra.

    When it comes to Maths. I appear to be really stupid to be honest. I learn very slowly and I seem like an idiot until it just “clicks” in my head and then I understand it. I find it hard to learn when someone is telling me or if I am just reading it. It won’t make any sense to me. I learn best where I have lots of examples that I can practice with and some explanations of what is going on. I can see how it works and I seem to learn faster than if I just read it.
    I’ve looked at some books in my local library and they are complete next to useless for someone like me. They expect you to know half the stuff already. They barely give any explanations as well. These books are for people who already know maths and I swear some of them even manage to find ways to make the simplest stuff look more complicated than it is.
    I want ones that are for complete and utter beginners. I want to start at the basic and then move up to more advanced stuff. I would also like it to be easy to read and give me explanations. Most of these books won’t say stuff that they think is obvious. Presumably because most of their readers have access to maths teachers and can ask them. I however don’t. So I want to books that will tell me the obvious. Also I want them to have questions and the solutions for these questions. That way I can see which areas I am good at and which areas I am weak at.

    I would love it if anyone could help me with this. I posted it in this forum because I assume that you guys probably have experience trying to find maths book.

    I don't mind paying extra if these books are really good. It would only be a one time cost that I can save up for.
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    What exam board will you be taking the exam for? If you take edexcel: Advanced Maths AS Core For Edexcel
    ISBN:0-582-84237-9

    Buy the other relevant books you need in this series.
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    (Original post by taliman)
    What exam board will you be taking the exam for? If you take edexcel: Advanced Maths AS Core For Edexcel
    ISBN:0-582-84237-9

    Buy the other relevant books you need in this series.

    I'm not in education at the moment. However I want to enroll to college next year to do an access course in Engineering. The year after that I want to do an Aerospace engineering course.

    I want to be at the level of the average aerospace student in their first year so I guess it would be helpful to use books for the most common exam board. Is it still edxcel?

    however would it still be accesabile for people like me who don't have teachers?
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    I'll just shamelessly bump this because i really want to learn maths.
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    (Original post by baskingwhilehot)
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    Try downloading a GCSE Maths paper and see how difficult you find that? The first step to finding a suitable book is deciding what level you are currently at.
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    "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!": Adventures of a Curious Character - Intersting Book
    Biostatistics: a Foundation for Analysis in the Health Sciences (Probability & Mathematical Statistics - Great book about statistics in First year maths
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    I second Kolya's suggestion! :yy:
    (Original post by 3.5Nando)
    "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!": Adventures of a Curious Character - Intersting Book.
    It's not a maths book, though, is it? The only maths bit I remember about it is when he talks about how he used differentiation under the integral sign skilfully. :awesome:
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    I'll assume that you know all of the maths on the GCSE syllabus to a fairly good level if you're planning on starting calculus, mechanics and some (presumably) advance trigonometry.

    For relatively basic mechanics, I think "Understanding Mechanics" by Saddler and Thorning is quite good. There are plenty of examples and exercises as well as explanations and it covers most, if not all of the mechanics you'll need, depending on the level you're aiming to get to. For slightly more advanced classical mechanics, David Morin's "Introduction to Classical Mechanics" seems like a good read; I haven't worked through all of it yet but so far, it has been useful and quite enjoyable too. The word "introduction" in the title is probably a bit misleading as it covers some more sophisticated areas of mechanics as well as ensuring you have a strong grip on the basics. The problems in this book are considerably more difficult than in "Understanding Mechanics".

    On an even higher level, "Classical Mechanics" by Herbert Goldstein and volume one of "Course of Theoretical Physics" by Landau and Lif****z are highly recommended by a lot of people. Goldstein's book is very expensive though. I haven't had chance to read either of these but they receive strong recommendations by those who have. From my understanding of how the books by Landau and Lif****z are set out, I'm not sure that you'll be a huge fan. I don't think they have any problems or exercises so you'd need another book at a similar level to do the exercises from.

    For pure mathematics, I have been using another text by Saddler and Thorning, "Understanding Pure Mathematics". Similarly to the mechanics one, it seems to strike a good balance between explanation, examples and problems and should cover most of the pure maths you want to learn. There are loads of exercises with answers for you to practice on. Shankar's "Basic Training in Mathematics" is a good book too but very expensive for what it is. Unless you can pick it up cheap or borrow it from a library, I wouldn't really recommend it because of the price and its limited level of usefulness to you.

    Finally, you'll probably want some more challenging problems to work through. Try to find the A-level maths books by Bostok and Chandler, they're really old now but contain lots of more difficult problems for you to have a go at. They also have explanations and examples for a variety of topics that might be useful to you and are available very cheaply now if you buy them second-hand. Irodov's "Problems in General Physics" is a huge collection of physics problems; there are quite a few on mechanics in there. The book is very hard to find now but can easily be downloaded if you would like to use it. Alternatively, a few book shops can order it in for you if you're willing to wait for a considerable amount of time. Similar to Irodov's book is Sergei Krotov's "Aptitude Tests in Physics". Again, it is very hard to find and the problems are rather difficult but it might prove useful to you if you can get hold of a copy.

    In addition to books, take a look at iTunes U - there are quite a few maths lectures from MIT and other leading universities that are completely free for you to download, these will come in handy if there's a particular topic you're struggling with. Even if you're finding mechanics very easy, I would recommend that you watch some of Walter Lewin's lectures on classical mechanics simply because they're brilliant. He's a really interesting speaker and all of his lectures are good fun to watch.

    Sorry for the long post, I seem to have recommended quite a few books and to be honest, it probably isn't advisable to buy them all. At first, start with a relatively basic, fairly comprehensive text on pure maths and a similar sort of book on mechanics. Once you have covered the material you need, consider trying some more difficult problems to show you have to true understanding of the topics you've been working on. Have a look on Amazon preview at some of the books I have suggested to see if they are to your liking and match your level.
 
 
 
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