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    Just a few questions for those who can answer them

    1) what is the difference between Actuarial mathematics and Actuarial science ?

    2) How long from University would it take the average person to become a fully qualified Actuary ?

    3) How many exams do you have to take ?

    4) Is there a limit to how many retakes you can do on exams ?

    5) What salary can I expect after 10 years of experience ?
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    (Original post by Green Glass)
    Just a few questions for those who can answer them

    1) what is the difference between Actuarial mathematics and Actuarial science ?

    2) How long from University would it take the average person to become a fully qualified Actuary ?

    3) How many exams do you have to take ?

    4) Is there a limit to how many retakes you can do on exams ?

    5) What salary can I expect after 10 years of experience ?
    I'll do my best..
    1) There isn't... but at different unis, the course will differ, so have a look at what modules are available, and also look at how much content would be covered for the CT exams, which would then help you work out how many exemptions you could apply for after uni.
    2) 6-10 years
    3) Quite a few!! 15 in total! There are 4 stages of exams :
    . Core technical - nine subjects, all of which you need to pass or be exempted from. Most of these are traditional exams, but subject CT9 is a two-day residential course.

    2. Core applications - three subjects you need to pass or be exempted from. Two of these, subjects CA2 and CA3, involve attendance at a two-day residential course

    3. Specialist technical - you need to pass or be exempted from two of the nine ST subjects available.

    4. Specialist applications - you need to pass one of the seven SA subjects available. No exemptions are available.
    When it says you can have exemptions, that means that its something that you will have done/been examined on in your degree, which is why you need to look at specific unis course structures
    4) At uni it will depend on whther they will let you do retakes on certain modules or not. The exams you do outside of this degree, you can retake! In fact many people do fail some of the harder modules first time round, and it's not that uncommon to retake.
    5) no idea
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    (Original post by supernova92)
    I'll do my best..
    1) There isn't... but at different unis, the course will differ, so have a look at what modules are available, and also look at how much content would be covered for the CT exams, which would then help you work out how many exemptions you could apply for after uni.
    2) 6-10 years
    3) Quite a few!! 26 in total! There are 4 stages of exams : When it says you can have exemptions, that means that it something that you will have done/been examined on in your gefree, which is why you need to look at specific unis course structures
    4) At uni it will depend on whther they will let you do retakes on certain modules or not. The exams you do outside of this degree, you can retake! In fact many people do fail some of the harder modules first time round, and it's not that uncommon to retake.
    5) no idea

    15 actually...
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    (Original post by my man the man)
    15 actually...
    Oh my bad..
    http://www.actuaries.org.uk/sites/al...k2010-2011.pdf For the OP this explains how many exams to take and how many you have to do out of each section
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    (Original post by supernova92)
    Oh my bad..
    http://www.actuaries.org.uk/sites/al...k2010-2011.pdf For the OP this explains how many exams to take and how many you have to do out of each section
    Im guessing you are going to apply for actuarial positions at uni considering you know a right but atm?????
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    (Original post by my man the man)
    Im guessing you are going to apply for actuarial positions at uni considering you know a right but atm?????
    Well I'll be starting uni in september... (check sig ) So i'm not in a position to give a lot of advice, just from info that unis have given me, and my own stuff that I've found!
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    (Original post by supernova92)
    Well I'll be starting uni in september... (check sig ) So i'm not in a position to give a lot of advice, just from info that unis have given me, and my own stuff that I've found!
    nice! I applied for a few actuarial courses but changed my mind at last minute
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    (Original post by my man the man)
    nice! I applied for a few actuarial courses but changed my mind at last minute
    Why's that? What did you end up applying for?
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    (Original post by supernova92)
    Why's that? What did you end up applying for?
    I initally applied to do actuarial science at cass, financial maths at hw, and maths at Bath, Leeds and Edinburgh!

    cass was certain for act sci but changed to financial maths at heriot watt!

    hmm an act sci degree doesnt have much pure maths compared to stats, plus its way too specialised, and when u become an actuary there isnt any real maths, something which i initially thought, but glad picked financial maths, as more much mathematical and u can do ALOT of maths in the job as a financial engineer
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    How come becoming an actuary is such a long tough process? What do they even do?? They must earn a shedload right?
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    (Original post by my man the man)
    I initally applied to do actuarial science at cass, financial maths at hw, and maths at Bath, Leeds and Edinburgh!

    cass was certain for act sci but changed to financial maths at heriot watt!

    hmm an act sci degree doesnt have much pure maths compared to stats, plus its way too specialised, and when u become an actuary there isnt any real maths, something which i initially thought, but glad picked financial maths, as more much mathematical and u can do ALOT of maths in the job as a financial engineer
    Yeah I get what you mean, but for me, applied maths was something I really wanted to do as opposed to pure maths.
    Where are you going to firm?
    At leeds and manchester ( I'm not really thinking about the other unis), the majorty of the first year is basically spent with the pure maths students anyways!
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    (Original post by bognor-regis)
    How come becoming an actuary is such a long tough process? What do they even do?? They must earn a shedload right?
    Yes, they do.
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    (Original post by supernova92)
    Yeah I get what you mean, but for me, applied maths was something I really wanted to do as opposed to pure maths.
    Where are you going to firm?
    At leeds and manchester ( I'm not really thinking about the other unis), the majorty of the first year is basically spent with the pure maths students anyways!
    heriot watt financial maths, first uni in uk to offer, it as its a good balance between pure maths/stats and applied maths in fincnaial markets such a pricing derivatives, btw im already a student there

    heriot watt also has a MASSIVE actuarial department, like one of best in UK, and first in UK as well so i know alot bout actuarial stuff in general!
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    (Original post by bognor-regis)
    How come becoming an actuary is such a long tough process? What do they even do?? They must earn a shedload right?
    Yeah, well an associate actuary (like a 'student actuary'), will usually earn around £30,000, and once you're qualified it's much more (but i don't have figures)
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    (Original post by bognor-regis)
    How come becoming an actuary is such a long tough process? What do they even do?? They must earn a shedload right?

    yes they do earn alot of money before qualifying you can earn up to £40,000 roughly, then qualified its from £50,000 and after 10 year experience £100,000 and more later if you open your own practice or if your bloody good and work in an international city!

    go to the actuary wesbite and find out more! they do alot of financial statistics related to insurance, pensions and investment and apply it to that.

    they are renouned to predict the financial future in any of fields mentioned, as they can work out insurance premiums etc, alot of stats so if ur keen on that then go for it
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    (Original post by my man the man)
    heriot watt financial maths, first uni in uk to offer, it as its a good balance between pure maths/stats and applied maths in fincnaial markets such a pricing derivatives, btw im already a student there

    heriot watt also has a MASSIVE actuarial department, like one of best in UK, and first in UK as well so i know alot bout actuarial stuff in general!
    Ohhh ok, well good luck with your degree etc
    Yeah I agree, I would have applied there, but the fact that it's so far away, and in edinburgh did put me off!
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    (Original post by supernova92)
    Ohhh ok, well good luck with your degree etc
    Yeah I agree, I would have applied there, but the fact that it's so far away, and in edinburgh did put me off!

    really??? Edinburgh is nice place must say lol
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    (Original post by my man the man)
    really??? Edinburgh is nice place must say lol
    I didn't mean it was bad! Just the fact that it's scotland, which is sooo far away for me, as i live by the sea in the south!
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    oh fair enough tbf! yea I can see ur reason behind that, u from hampshire/devon/somerset????
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    (Original post by supernova92)
    I'll do my best..
    2) 6-10 years
    Much less than this, about 3-6 years (The three starts if you have an AS degree)
 
 
 
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