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    (Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
    Experience and observation makes me say that. In the long run, 'work hard, play hard' is impossible to maintain. Sooner or later, you'll have to settle for one. From what I have heard on here, you're around 15 or 16, so please believe someone almost twice your age.
    I've heard differently. Work hard play hard is alive and well in the City. In the sense of 'play hard tonight, because you have a deal coming up and won't see the light of day for the next month'.
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    (Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
    Pubs are packed with tourists and overpriced. College bars get old quickly, and so do the few clubs there are. And what happens if I have a particular taste in music or films?

    Of course you can get an internship (probably easier than at most other unis), but it will be somewhere else in the country. And that's annoying/costly.
    very few pubs are packed with tourists but yes those are overpriced as they're there to attract tourists. loads of non crowded reasonably priced pubs. Why does a college bar get old quickly ? cheap, friendly, loads of people you know = good fun.

    There are way more than enough clubs, and if you have a particular taste there are a few non mainstream nights out every week. There's also a cinema on cowley which caters for unusual tastes.

    It doesn't matter if the internship is somewhere else, we only have accomodation during term time anyway (unless living out obv) => even if it were in oxford we would need to find accommodation for it

    And if someone was actually that fussed about nightlife that they wouldn't survive in oxford, london is close enough to go there just for a night out. But I have to say most people would find it a waste of time.
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    From a when I was about the age of 4 or 5 I have always dreamed to go to Oxford. It is the best university, it gives you an opportunity like no other university. Oxford also have beautiful grounds, so does Cambridge. I am going to admitt how jealous I am of people who get places for either university. I tried my hardest throughout high school, further education and outter school activities, but it wasn't enough. It might be due to the school I actually come from, I knew I should of never turned down going to a Private School when I could.
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    Why are you envious anyways? They're just the same bags of lipids and proteins like the rest of us. Just trying to avoid inevitable chemical equilibrium with their environment like everyone else. Get over them.
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    (Original post by mf2004)
    There's also a cinema on cowley which caters for unusual tastes.
    There's one in Jericho too.
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    (Original post by street.lovin')
    To each their own.

    Someone like you probably suit to live in London. Not everywhere is going to be perfect. And you can get a lot of internships in Cambridge. It's just that millions of them are in London so people choose to do it in London. Once you became a student there you will know the particular place in the city that have what you want interms of pubs/music, if you get what I mean.

    In terms of colleg bars, isn't that the same for every uni? And to be honest, Cambridge unviersity probably has a much better student union than many other unis will have. Cambridge is also a university town so the nature of the city will pretty much be adjusted according to the nature of the population (who mainly are students). It is definitely not as good as London, but you can't really compare anything to London. lol.

    For the tourism and overpricing issue, yes there are lots of tourism. But that's probably the same for London or anywhere in the UK. And are you sure that everyone in the pubs you went into are tourists? Bare in mind that it is quite multicultural in Cambridge so not looking like British people doesn't mean they are tourists, they could be students or people who live there. AND, Cambridge is regarded as a rather well off city in the East Anglia. So, some of the stuffs may seem overpriced, however, I wouldn't say it is worse than overpriced stuffs in London.
    Sensible points.

    Yes, I am a city boy, so my view is biased of course. And yes, of course there are internships, it's just that there aren't enough for the masses of students, you know. You're also right about the college bars, but then London students don't really go there in the first place, as they have hundreds of really cool bars on their doorstep. In Oxbridge, you kinda lack alternatives. Regarding tourists, yes, there are masses in London, too. But as soon as you leave the centre, they disappear. I live in zone one, but I have many great pubs around my place where only locals hang out, and it's great. They're also quite affordable, and even a bit cheaper than the pubs I've been to in Cambridge.
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    (Original post by joanna-eve)
    OP shouldn't be jealous as being jealous gets you nowhere. Do your masters there if it means that much to you OP! I don't think that he should be jealous of their intelligence either as you can't make yourself more intelligent, that's like trying to make yourself have better spatial awareness - you can practice all you want but at the end of the day it's mainly genetic. I do agree though that special has pretty much lost its meaning these days and in some ways everyone could be considered special because of its loose meaning.
    The link between intelligence and genes is somewhat dubious. That there should be one seems common sense, but it's a claim unsupported by much empirical research. Largely due to the difficulty of objectively defining intelligence. There is a lot to be said for one's formative years.
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    (Original post by TurboCretin)
    I've heard differently. Work hard play hard is alive and well in the City. In the sense of 'play hard tonight, because you have a deal coming up and won't see the light of day for the next month'.
    It sure is alive, but after a few years those bankers either settle down (be it because they're exhausted or because they met someone...) or suffer from burn-out. I've been in consulting, I know a thing or two about this stuff.
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    (Original post by joanna-eve)
    So you think only large cities can be interesting? You have a strange outlook on life, my friend. A place is what you bring to it.
    No I haven't been to Westfield, but I have been shopping in London, to Camden market, covent garden, brick lane etc. we have just the same kinds of things in cambridge in the market outside M&S and in the grand arcade, grafton centre and lion yard, plus all the little shops in the streets connecting them. Shops are dying anyway, what with the rise of online shopping.
    Small towns can be charming and calming (nice for a few days away from the city), but not really interesting in a way that I would like to live there. Many people share this opinion.

    Well, despite buying most of my stuff online, I wouldn't want to (and couldn't really) do without Westfield and Oxford Street. It may be loud and packed with people most of the time, but the selection and ambience beats everything.
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    (Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
    It sure is alive, but after a few years those bankers either settle down (be it because they're exhausted or because they met someone...) or suffer from burn-out. I've been in consulting, I know a thing or two about this stuff.
    You're right about that. I know a now ex-partner at Clifford Chance who's just taken time out to learn piano and take a masters in history. I have little experience myself because I simply don't have the years behind me, but I'm acutely aware that the City environment is primarily a young people's game. All I was saying is that when you work hard, the play, when it comes, will be very hard indeed.
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    (Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
    Experience and observation makes me say that. In the long run, 'work hard, play hard' is impossible to maintain. Sooner or later, you'll have to settle for one. From what I have heard on here, you're around 15 or 16, so please believe someone almost twice your age.
    So you think both can't be done.

    I'll prove that both can be done.

    Please do insult the university I am attending, I could not care less. I am getting out of it what I want, and am a top student - that's all I care about.
    :rolleyes:

    Commuting to internships sucks. Have you ever done it?
    Some people enjoy (short!) train journeys?! :dontknow:
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    (Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
    It sure is better than a lot of other towns in the UK (that is mainly to do with the UK being crap in general, but let's stick to the topic here): it does have low crime and unemployment rates, it's pretty green and quite clean, high percentage of academics, etc. But those are things that usually appeal to pensioners, not twens who move out from home from the first time and want to experience something. In a big city, there's just so much more to do, and it makes for a much more compelling experience overall.
    Speak for yourself, those things appeal to me.
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    What a ridiculous thread. University education is irrelevant by itself unless you're aiming for a very narrow range of occupations.

    It is quite telling that the people commenting are predominantly the sort who are current students or about to apply. You'll find out soon enough that even Oxford or Cambridge on your CV won't get you very far.

    The institution does not make the man, the man makes the institution.
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    I can kinda understand the argument about Oxford (I haven't been to Cambridge in a good 10 years or so) being small and quiet compared to London. As a Londoner, the place was far too small for me. I think the thing that people are forgetting at the moment is that London is an incredibly easy commute from either institution and that Oxford at least is certainly a very buzzing place with plenty of stuff to do. Not on the same scale as London, of course, but there's little point comparing two cities that are so different. Few cities in the world can be said to match the London experience.

    If you're a student in Oxford or Cambridge (this goes for Brookes and Anglia Ruskin too, don't forget), you have both the scenic picturesque Brideshead Revisted quaint Oxford/Cambridge atmosphere and London within easy reach and the surrounding countryside. It's like how living in leafy London suburbs can be considered the best of both worlds too
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    (Original post by TurboCretin)
    The link between intelligence and genes is somewhat dubious. That there should be one seems common sense, but it's a claim unsupported by much empirical research. Largely due to the difficulty of objectively defining intelligence. There is a lot to be said for one's formative years.
    I did say mainly, I agree that a lot of the brain's pathways are formed at a young age (I think before 5years?) which is why we should start reading at a young age - which in turn is linked to class as studies have shown that parents of higher classes tend to get their kids reading younger. Then again, my mother is a polyglot (although she has never made any effort to teach me her languages )and my best subjects are languages, so perhaps there is a link...
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    So you think both can't be done.
    That is not what I said. I said it cannot be maintained over a prolonged period of time; either your work performance will suffer or you'll settle down a bit in your free time.


    (Original post by im so academic)
    Some people enjoy (short!) train journeys?! :dontknow:
    Haven't met such people. But if you say so...
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    (Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
    Haven't met such people. But if you say so...
    I enjoy train rides
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    I enjoy train rides
    So Do I.
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    (Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
    Small towns can be charming and calming (nice for a few days away from the city), but not really interesting in a way that I would like to live there. Many people share this opinion.

    Well, despite buying most of my stuff online, I wouldn't want to (and couldn't really) do without Westfield and Oxford Street. It may be loud and packed with people most of the time, but the selection and ambience beats everything.
    Haha I feel the total opposite - sometimes you need to go into a big city like London so a few days but they're too big and busy and noisy and also I hate going on the tube, but that's another matter :L
    Although - if you were looking for a place to go to uni, as OP is, then it would probably be best to not go to somewhere as busy as London otherwise you wouldn't get any work done :dontknow:
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    LOL, people think Oxford is in the middle of nowhere??
 
 
 
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