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    I love this program (Y)
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    Yes, and I've explained why they might seem to be doing disproportionatly well. If you can't read an argumentr, why bother responding?
    1. I was talking about them as medical students, not as doctors.

    2. They are from well off families, not well off themselves.

    3. They are not representative of medical students.

    4. They are not inspirational since none of them have overcome any barrier in particular to become doctors. This does not devalue their degree or the work that they put in, but that THEY COULD BE MORE INSPIRATIONAL IF THEY HAD HAD DIFFICULTIES.

    5. The BBC has aimed this as a "lighthearted" and "heartwarming" documentary. It does not dissect issues.

    6. If you can't be bothered reading my argument, shut up.
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    (Original post by Harbour Seal)
    1. I was talking about them as medical students, not as doctors.

    2. They are from well off families, not well off themselves.

    3. They are not representative of medical students.

    4. They are not inspirational since none of them have overcome any barrier in particular to become doctors. This does not devalue their degree or the work that they put in, but that THEY COULD BE MORE INSPIRATIONAL IF THEY HAD HAD DIFFICULTIES.

    5. The BBC has aimed this as a "lighthearted" and "heartwarming" documentary. It does not dissect issues.

    6. If you can't be bothered reading my argument, shut up.
    How could you possibly know?

    The irony of judging them when you don't begin to have any ****ing idea what you're talking about. You can **** off you bloody moron.
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    Harbour, the only point I would disagree with is that having parents with money means you have no difficulty going through medical school. To be honest none of us know whether they did or did not have any problems to overcome. Bently in driveway does not always mean no problems in life.
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    (Original post by Harbour Seal)
    1. I was talking about them as medical students, not as doctors.

    2. They are from well off families, not well off themselves.

    3. They are not representative of medical students.

    4. They are not inspirational since none of them have overcome any barrier in particular to become doctors. This does not devalue their degree or the work that they put in, but that THEY COULD BE MORE INSPIRATIONAL IF THEY HAD HAD DIFFICULTIES.

    5. The BBC has aimed this as a "lighthearted" and "heartwarming" documentary. It does not dissect issues.

    6. If you can't be bothered reading my argument, shut up.
    See you have to be careful of reverse snobbery.

    I used to have a bit (a lot) of this when I started medical school. Mainly because of my upbringing and background.

    But you have no idea of the lives people lead. What if one of them has had an eating disorder? Or overcame cancer? Or lost a parent at a young age? Even if they haven't had any of those things happened you have no right to extrapolate that because they appear to have material wealth that they don't have problems.

    When I have children they will be in a much more stable and affluent family than I ever was. I will be annoyed if I see them making judgments about people who appear to have less than them, but will also be weary of people writing them (and me) off as somehow less equal because we have things that they don't.

    If you want to be a doctor there are going to be more people from middle class backgrounds than any other. Unless you want to alienate lots of future friends, patients and colleagues you might want to start being a more open minded.
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    How could you possibly know?

    The irony of judging them when you don't begin to have any ****ing idea what you're talking about. You can **** off you bloody moron.
    Because their profiles are on the BBC website? Because they are on a TV programme which looks at them in detail? Because, despite editing etc, people love a good inspirational story of people overcoming the odds and it would be stupid to cut this out? We heard about Katherine failing a first year exam and having to resit them, so if any were a single parent or had worked in the army all their lives or anything denoting difficulty it would be mentioned?

    Has your common sense and ability to deduce information gone AWOL today?
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    (Original post by Harbour Seal)
    Because their profiles are on the BBC website? Because they are on a TV programme which looks at them in detail? Because, despite editing etc, people love a good inspirational story of people overcoming the odds and it would be stupid to cut this out? We heard about Katherine failing a first year exam and having to resit them, so if any were a single parent or had worked in the army all their lives or anything denoting difficulty it would be mentioned?

    Has your common sense and ability to deduce information gone AWOL today?

    LOL

    They don't have to divulge every aspect of their lives to TV you know, who knows, theres probably stuff we're not being told. Just as with the patients on the show, there are things we're not being told. Do you honestly think problems with one of the patients stopped at difficulty to cannulate? Or perhaps because they dress professionally, they have to be rich? Or maybe, their patents worked hard too? Those people will have seen some pretty horrible things in their training, arguably things 20 odd year olds shouldn't have to see. But you are not them, you wouldn't have a clue exactly what they went through to get there. Before you treat your future patients, I hope you don't think - we'll this person is a little middle class, so that means...end result, oh I don't have to treat them as well as my other patients because he has money.

    You are right though, one of us has lost their ability to reason, the first law of medicine is assume nothing.
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    Kind of hoping this was a programme showing medics at university getting drunk; oh well!
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    (Original post by Harbour Seal)
    The previous series on doctors on the BBC in the early nineties (impossible to find and watch, but there is an accompanying book for the series which is just a little bit great) did not shirk from issues of racism, sexism, family circumstance and class. Whilst this series is quite fun and I am enjoying it, it is still very lighthearted in nature and does not seek to dissect any of the issues which affect people in general, not just doctors.
    I think they did a series last year following up on all those people and seeing what they are up to now. Was it like a group of students from a medical school that they followed? One with kids and stuff.
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    (Original post by Sarky)
    See you have to be careful of reverse snobbery.

    I used to have a bit (a lot) of this when I started medical school. Mainly because of my upbringing and background.

    But you have no idea of the lives people lead. What if one of them has had an eating disorder? Or overcame cancer? Or lost a parent at a young age? Even if they haven't had any of those things happened you have no right to extrapolate that because they appear to have material wealth that they don't have problems.

    When I have children they will be in a much more stable and affluent family than I ever was. I will be annoyed if I see them making judgments about people who appear to have less than them, but will also be weary of people writing them (and me) off as somehow less equal because we have things that they don't.

    If you want to be a doctor there are going to be more people from middle class backgrounds than any other. Unless you want to alienate lots of future friends, patients and colleagues you might want to start being a more open minded.
    If I want to be a doctor, I will mostly be treating people from working class backgrounds, since they have a higher chance of ill-health.

    Class is not something I care about in particular, but when one small group of people are classed as "inspirational" (as per the OP and the whole point of this thread) I have to question why. I see nothing particularly inspirational about them other than they are young doctors. There is some incidence of tragedy which has already been mentioned (Lucy's sister has cystic fibrosis) but other than that there has been no mention of anything else. Mental illness, I will admit, I had not considered. It is not something that would be mentioned publicly for fear of damaging their careers, which is a shame.

    Finally, the final fault lies not with the people, who can't help their lives, but with the BBC who have aired a show about the Foundation Years of a group of doctors that is not particularly informative or issue-based but is aimed at being light entertainment on BBC3. By all means, I hope they do well. But I fail to really see them as inspirational characters when the BBC won't portray them as such.
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    (Original post by Harbour Seal)
    If I want to be a doctor, I will mostly be treating people from working class backgrounds, since they have a higher chance of ill-health.

    Class is not something I care about in particular, but when one small group of people are classed as "inspirational" (as per the OP and the whole point of this thread) I have to question why. I see nothing particularly inspirational about them other than they are young doctors. There is some incidence of tragedy which has already been mentioned (Lucy's sister has cystic fibrosis) but other than that there has been no mention of anything else. Mental illness, I will admit, I had not considered. It is not something that would be mentioned publicly for fear of damaging their careers, which is a shame.

    Finally, the final fault lies not with the people, who can't help their lives, but with the BBC who have aired a show about the Foundation Years of a group of doctors that is not particularly informative or issue-based but is aimed at being light entertainment on BBC3. By all means, I hope they do well. But I fail to really see them as inspirational characters when the BBC won't portray them as such.

    The thread starter didn't say they were inspirational, they asked if they were.

    Yes you will see more working class patients, but your colleagues and many of your patients will be working class.

    You seem to have this notion that these doctors will have disclosed absolutely everything about their personal lives. They will all have things that they may choose not to discuss for whatever reason. Don't be naive enough to assume that just because they don't mention things that they aren't there.

    You are a single parent with aspirations to be a doctor. That is fantastic and I wish you luck. However you don't have a right to conclude that their lives don't have problems or that they can't compare to other people's problems. I could bore everyone with my "inspirational" story about how I overcame the odds and blah blah blah but it isn't necessary. By the time you get to adulthood most people have stories of how life has screwed people over.

    You really do yourself no favours by trying to present this "them and us" scenario. All of my uni friends (apart from one) have more affluent background than myself and not only are they going to be great doctors, they have all done their bit in helping me get through medical school. Everyone one of them has had **** happen to them and me saying "yeah ok this happened to you but i bet you didn't have to deal with xyz as well" would leave me with no friends and a reputation as a ********.

    No point just being open minded with your working class patients...:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    LOL

    They don't have to divulge every aspect of their lives to TV you know, who knows, theres probably stuff we're not being told. Just as with the patients on the show, there are things we're not being told. Do you honestly think problems with one of the patients stopped at difficulty to cannulate? Or perhaps because they dress professionally, they have to be rich? Or maybe, their patents worked hard too? Those people will have seen some pretty horrible things in their training, arguably things 20 odd year olds shouldn't have to see. But you are not them, you wouldn't have a clue exactly what they went through to get there. Before you treat your future patients, I hope you don't think - we'll this person is a little middle class, so that means...end result, oh I don't have to treat them as well as my other patients because he has money.

    You are right though, one of us has lost their ability to reason, the first law of medicine is assume nothing.
    We pretty much wrote the same thing lol
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    The childminder bit is probably true, but I wouldn't be so judgemental about the money thing. Don't forget that the BBC is paying for their nice house, and while some of them have a flash car etc, it doesn't mean that they were rolling in it right through med school. Plenty of med students have a lot of financial difficulties, especially with NHS bursaries.
    This!

    But the car sucks tbh. :P
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    They're all employed and living in a free house now though, so you can't really judge what university might have been like. I know we've seen a couple of them have well-off parents, but I wouldn't make too many assumptions.
    This
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    How could you possibly know?

    The irony of judging them when you don't begin to have any ****ing idea what you're talking about. You can **** off you bloody moron.
    I would rep you if I could.

    Agree.
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    (Original post by Sarky)
    See you have to be careful of reverse snobbery.

    I used to have a bit (a lot) of this when I started medical school. Mainly because of my upbringing and background.

    But you have no idea of the lives people lead. What if one of them has had an eating disorder? Or overcame cancer? Or lost a parent at a young age? Even if they haven't had any of those things happened you have no right to extrapolate that because they appear to have material wealth that they don't have problems.

    When I have children they will be in a much more stable and affluent family than I ever was. I will be annoyed if I see them making judgments about people who appear to have less than them, but will also be weary of people writing them (and me) off as somehow less equal because we have things that they don't.

    If you want to be a doctor there are going to be more people from middle class backgrounds than any other. Unless you want to alienate lots of future friends, patients and colleagues you might want to start being a more open minded.
    Great post, agree
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    I think it was great; the fact that the people on the programme were normal made the idea of a what sort of career all your hard work can end up as. Gutted it's over - well, as of tomorrow

    I wish the BBC would make more documentaries like this!
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    I think its great ... for those who are appling its an easy way to see in to life of a young doctor .. to see what you are in for i think not many people will have watched this programme and let it change their mind to wether to apply or not ... i think it will just help people reinforce their decisions or make them think twice about what to do .... personally I cant wait to apply for medicine for 2012 entry and seeing this has made me all the more excited XD
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    How many more episodes are there?
    On what the OP actually said, yeah every time I watch reality TV programmes about medicine it always makes me think it looks like an attractive career. But for me to do it now would be for 4 years on top of the 3 I have left here till I got to the stage they were on the programme. Dunno yet whether I could wait that long for a salary and a job...
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    And you don't have to have overcome hardships in life to be inspirational.
 
 
 
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