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    to get to the point, how is a +/- charge of a coulomb (also a voltage, although I think they would agree with eachother) in relation to an excess electron?
    for example with 1000 excess electrons or ANY number of excess, would the C value be + or -??

    here's why I ask:
    "1 electron charge = 1.6 * 10^(-19) C"
    looks like coulomb charge = + with excess electrons...
    but "The charge on a pith ball is -2.0x10^(-14) C. Therefore there are 125,000 excess electrons."
    looks like coulomb charge = - with excess electrons...
    both examples were taken from my course. I'm binging tonight, I'd like to get done my unit by 8 am.
    thanks a ton! I think my textbook is paradoxal, one of the examples are wrong.
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    :bump: sorry guys. wont expect to find bright intuitivness at this time of night
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    (Original post by emerset)
    to get to the point, how is a +/- charge of a coulomb (also a voltage, although I think they would agree with eachother) in relation to an excess electron?
    for example with 1000 excess electrons or ANY number of excess, would the C value be + or -??

    here's why I ask:
    "1 electron charge = 1.6 * 10^(-19) C"
    looks like coulomb charge = + with excess electrons...
    but "The charge on a pith ball is -2.0x10^(-14) C. Therefore there are 125,000 excess electrons."
    looks like coulomb charge = - with excess electrons...
    both examples were taken from my course. I'm binging tonight, I'd like to get done my unit by 8 am.
    thanks a ton! I think my textbook is paradoxal, one of the examples are wrong.
    OK basically,

    1 electron charge = - 1.6 * 10^(-19) C [you forgot the neg. sign here]

    so for example, if my pithball has a charge of - 1.6 * 10^(-19) C, then I have one electron excess.

    Therefore, if my pithball has a charge of - 3.2 * 10^(-19) C, then I have two electrons excess.

    But..if my pithball has a charge of + 1.6 * 10^(-19) C, then I have one electron missing.

    so, if my pithball has a charge of + 3.2 * 10^(-19) C, then I have two electrons missing.

    SO......

    + Charge = electron(s) missing
    - Charge = electron(s) extra

    Hope that helps.
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    (Original post by emerset)
    :bump: sorry guys. wont expect to find bright intuitivness at this time of night
    Nope, you can expect it LOL!!!
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    (Original post by CoolDude)
    Nope, you can expect it LOL!!!
    I love it, you can count on TSR, more faithful and timely and mathematically impeccable (while morally unaccountable) than any program in the real world:cool:
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    (Original post by emerset)
    I love it, you can count on TSR, more faithful and timely and mathematically impeccable (while morally unaccountable) than any program in the real world:cool:
    lol! oK, GOOD LUCK with your assignment!
 
 
 
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