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    (Original post by TheFatController)
    ...which is also a legal limit.

    In the rare situation that someone was found to be under the limit but still under their 'own' limit, and therefore caused an accident, they would be done for drink driving.
    That's not what she was saying. I believe she was refering to an individuals own limit as the amount of alcohol they can drink before that individuals blood alcohol levels exceed the legal limit.

    For example, If I had a pint of beer and drove home i'd be comfortably under the legal limit. If my other half tried to drink a pint of beer and drive she would be over the limit.
    I am bigger and have more blood for the same amount of alcohol to become more diluted compared to my partner.

    Simples.
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    (Original post by TheFatController)
    Not here, some countries do have this though.
    Fancy meeting up for a pint mate? I ll take the first round then you are next lol
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    Zero tolerance is pointless as well as virtually impossible to enforce - things are bad enough as it is for prosecutions with the current limits Also, many people who drink drive just don't care and are not a bit over.

    There was a leaflet PDF somewhere on the internet done by the Transport Research Laboratory in the 1980s - the graph was of blood alcohol content and the likelihood of an accident. The rise in risk between 0% and 0.05% was negligble, 0.05-0.08% was a bit of a rise (0.08% being the blood alcohol content limit) and then it went through the roof.

    The idea people can measure by the drinks they have if they're ok to drive is so off it's unreal. So many factors play that the only way you could do it is by a breathalyser. They did a test on 5th gear on retail breathalysers compared to a police one and the better quality ones (approx £50) were virtually as good! The only difference with the police ones is they get approval from the Home Office and are much more suited to regular use as well as having evidential functions. I got one of the £50 ones, I have two pints and I can't even blow near the drink drive limit, while someone I know can got way over.

    Also as well noted there are two separate offences for drink driving which don't overlap. There's driving whilst over the prescribed Limits (s5 Road Traffic Act 1988) and driving whilst unfit through drink or drugs (s4 Road Traffic Act 1988). You can commit one without the other. Don't forget there is also the offence of being drunk in charge of said vehicle, either by being unfit or over the prescribed limits.

    Drink driving is a fraught thing that still catches people and police out alike. There's so many procedures and chances to fall foul of the law. However, people still die as a result of drink driving, which is completely unacceptable. There is a prescribed limit, set by science. Use that as well as some common sense about driving and you should be ok, as should everyone else.

    Here's the guide I mentioned: http://www.80mg.org.uk/ddfacts.html - things have changed a little, but seeing as we're relying on law that's from the same time, no doubt it's still a relevant thing to read.
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    (Original post by fruit_n_veg)
    Zero tolerance is pointless as well as virtually impossible to enforce - things are bad enough as it is for prosecutions with the current limits Also, many people who drink drive just don't care and are not a bit over.

    There was a leaflet PDF somewhere on the internet done by the Transport Research Laboratory in the 1980s - the graph was of blood alcohol content and the likelihood of an accident. The rise in risk between 0% and 0.05% was negligble, 0.05-0.08% was a bit of a rise (0.08% being the blood alcohol content limit) and then it went through the roof.

    The idea people can measure by the drinks they have if they're ok to drive is so off it's unreal. So many factors play that the only way you could do it is by a breathalyser. They did a test on 5th gear on retail breathalysers compared to a police one and the better quality ones (approx £50) were virtually as good! The only difference with the police ones is they get approval from the Home Office and are much more suited to regular use as well as having evidential functions. I got one of these, I have two pints and I can't even blow near the drink drive limit, while someone I know can got way over.

    Also as well noted there are two separate offences for drink driving which don't overlap. There's driving whilst over the prescribed Limits (s5 Road Traffic Act 1988) and driving whilst unfit through drink or drugs (s4 Road Traffic Act 1988). You can commit one without the other. Don't forget there is also the offence of being drunk in charge of said vehicle, either by being unfit or over the prescribed limits.

    Drink driving is a fraught thing that still catches people and police out alike. There's so many procedures and chances to fall foul of the law. However, people still die as a result of drink driving, which is completely unacceptable. There is a prescribed limit, set by science. Use that as well as some common sense about driving and you should be ok, as should everyone else.
    Good post.

    You can buy a police-type HO-approved one?
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    (Original post by AnythingButChardonnay)
    Good post.

    You can buy a police-type HO-approved one?
    Thanks - nice to see people appreciate it!

    That's bad structure on my part - I don't have a HO approved one, I got one of them off 5th gear. They're often Drager breathalysers in the UK, such as the one in the link at the bottom. These cost about a grand! :eek:

    http://www.draeger.com/UK/en/product...otest_6810.jsp
 
 
 
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