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Leeds Met will not charge £9000, but £8,500 fees watch

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    (Original post by MM1234)
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-12879817

    Leeds Metropolitan has become the first of the newer, less selective group of universities to officially announce its new fee level.

    Announcing the fee level, the chair of the board at Leeds Metropolitan University, Lord Woolmer of Leeds, said: "We are totally committed to providing a high quality student experience.
    Is this a joke or wat ?
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    I am not quite sure but:

    Assumptions:
    degree length is 4 years
    Maintenance loan is taken every year
    degree is taken in London
    interest is 1.5%


    £9,000 per year fees + £6,000 maintenance loan = £15,000 pa
    £15,000 * 4 = £60,000 for a degree

    Salary is £26,000 , £5,000 above threshold , 9% taxed = £450 pa not significant isn't it?

    However here comes the funny bit:
    £60,000 * 1.015 = £60,900 interest

    £900 - £450 = £450 MORE IN DEBT !

    So in order to at least STOP the debt increasing exponentially :

    x * 0.09 = 900 x = 10000 => you have to earn £31,000

    Obviously with time the salary will exceed 31k but by that time you will earn a couple more grand of debt.

    By increasing the threshold from £15,000 to £21,000 the government is actually getting more of our money and catching in the never lasting debt payment.

    Thoughts>?
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    (Original post by kaosu_souzousha)
    I am not quite sure but:

    By increasing the threshold from £15,000 to £21,000 the government is actually getting more of our money and catching in the never lasting debt payment.

    Thoughts>?
    Wasn't that the agenda in the first place though - to free up more cash for the country? Fair cop to them they're managing it, but I'm not saying I agree or support it by any stretch.


    I'm just finishing this year at Leeds met, and I'm still paying the £2000 p.a fees and to be perfectly honest thats a pure bargain considering the sort of tuition I'm receiving. I'm studying BA Events Management an not only do I get a tonne of face time with my tutors I get the benefit of being taught by a number of the authors of the textbooks we use. Plus the majority of lecturers have extensive contacts in the industry, so the networking opportunities are fantastic.

    Plus, Leeds Met offer the best Events degree in europe, second only to some American institutions and one Australian.

    So to me I feel like I should be paying 8.5k p.a already.

    Of course this is only my experience and only taking into account one course offered. Leeds met have a good status as a Sports uni as well don't they?

    They get a lot of bad press, but I dont reckon its anywhere near as bad as peple make it out to be. But hey, thats my opinion on the matter.
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    (Original post by WelshBluebird)
    But a 1st in politics or Law Or History etc etc would be better than having no degree at all. Again, it all depends on the course .
    Not necessarily. It depends on your career aspirations as well.

    If you're thinking doing an LLB at an ex-poly will help you become a barrister, think again.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Not necessarily. It depends on your career aspirations as well.

    If you're thinking doing an LLB at an ex-poly will help you become a barrister, think again.
    Another elitist view backed up by no real facts just completely biased opinion? gdgd.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Not necessarily. It depends on your career aspirations as well.

    If you're thinking doing an LLB at an ex-poly will help you become a barrister, think again.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nick_Freeman
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    Solicitor =/= barrister.

    (Original post by Tommyjw)
    Another elitist view backed up by no real facts just completely biased opinion? gdgd.
    http://www.innertemple.org.uk/index....2&limitstart=2

    You will also, of course, need to work hard to achieve the best grades possible. Aspiring barristers should focus on getting the best grades in challenging subjects that are of interest to them. Your ability in those courses could not only affect your chances of receiving an offer of a place at university, particularly at the most selective universities, but also your professional progression in a range of careers later in life.

    The Bar is a competitive profession and you will need to demonstrate that you have excelled academically in your school and at university. Some Chambers and Employed Bar institutions look back to your school grades to assess your application compared to the many other outstanding applicants.

    Increasing competition has meant that the majority of pupillage positions are offered to those with at least an upper second class honours in their undergraduate degrees and high A-level grades. Chambers may consider exceptional candidates outside this range but you should remember that you will be competing with those of high academic merit.

    http://prospectus.lmu.ac.uk/main/det...6&attendance=1

    UCAS Tariff Points: 260 points

    260 points is not exactly "high academic merit" or of "high A-level grades". Sure, someone could go to do Leeds Met law with AAA, but really?
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    If you're thinking doing an LLB at an ex-poly will help you become a barrister, think again.
    You'd have a better chance than someone who had no degree.
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    (Original post by WelshBluebird)
    You'd have a better chance than someone who had no degree.
    That's a pointless statement. It's like saying doing BA Events Management is better than no degree if you intend to be a doctor or a barrister or an engineer. :rolleyes:

    That also doesn't justify the (lack of) worth of said degrees.
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    (Original post by Dude Where's My Username)
    This revelation isn't as funny as the one the Daily Mail claimed a while back that "The University of East London would need to charge the same as Imperial and UCL [£9,000] otherwise students would think it was a second rate university" :lolwut:

    I've yet to read another tabloid sentence this year that made laugh as hard as that one
    It's the word 'otherwise' that gets me. Nothing against UEL, it's a good uni for some subjects, but most people already consider it second rate.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    That's a pointless statement. It's like saying doing BA Events Management is better than no degree if you intend to be a doctor or a barrister or an engineer. :rolleyes:

    That also doesn't justify the (lack of) worth of said degrees.
    Doctor or engineer, no chance ... but there's nothing to stop them doing a law conversion and becoming a barrister. It's unlikely, but possible.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    That's a pointless statement. It's like saying doing BA Events Management is better than no degree if you intend to be a doctor or a barrister or an engineer. :rolleyes:

    That also doesn't justify the (lack of) worth of said degrees.
    Firsty, a degree doesn't always have to relate to the career you want to do. Just having a degree is enough to get your foot in the door. (obviously not for being a doctor etc etc). Someone can do Law, and not fancy pursuing a legal career.

    Secondly, it isn't pointless. You questioned the worth of going to a place like leeds met in comparison to not going to uni at all. In reality, as long as you get a decent mark (1st or a 2.1) in a decent course (which History and Law are), then you ARE in a better position than someone who didn't get a degree full stop.
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    It's the word 'otherwise' that gets me. Nothing against UEL, it's a good uni for some subjects, but most people already consider it second rate.
    It is second rate. You're telling me UEL is up there with the likes of Imperial, UCL and LSE?
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    It is second rate. You're telling me UEL is up there with the likes of Imperial, UCL and LSE?
    No... :confused:
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    Doctor or engineer, no chance ... but there's nothing to stop them doing a law conversion and becoming a barrister. It's unlikely, but possible.
    If they fail the Common Professional Examination, well yes. They can't even do the BVC.

    Oh and:

    http://www.innertemple.org.uk/index....2&limitstart=2

    You will also, of course, need to work hard to achieve the best grades possible. Aspiring barristers should focus on getting the best grades in challenging subjects that are of interest to them. Your ability in those courses could not only affect your chances of receiving an offer of a place at university, particularly at the most selective universities, but also your professional progression in a range of careers later in life.

    The Bar is a competitive profession and you will need to demonstrate that you have excelled academically in your school and at university. Some Chambers and Employed Bar institutions look back to your school grades to assess your application compared to the many other outstanding applicants.

    Increasing competition has meant that the majority of pupillage positions are offered to those with at least an upper second class honours in their undergraduate degrees and high A-level grades. Chambers may consider exceptional candidates outside this range but you should remember that you will be competing with those of high academic merit.

    - BA Events Management from an ex-poly with classification 2:1 is hardly of "high academic merit".

    Remember, they'd be competing with people with 1sts from Oxbridge, LSE, UCL etc
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    Makes Cambridge's £9,000 look value for money...
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    No... :confused:
    Thus it is second rate.
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    (Original post by Junaid16)
    Makes Cambridge's £9,000 look value for money...
    And if you're poor and want to go to Oxford, it makes Leeds Met take the piss:

    http://www.ox.ac.uk/media/news_relea.../110315_1.html
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Thus it is second rate.
    You're making it sound you've enlightened me - I already said it in my first post on the matter.
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    You're making it sound you've enlightened me - I already said it in my first post on the matter.
    You implied as if it weren't second-rate:

    "It's the word 'otherwise' that gets me. Nothing against UEL, it's a good uni for some subjects, but most people already consider it second rate."

    You sound fascinated. Of course most people already consider it second rate! The others don't even rate it...
 
 
 
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