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    (Original post by im so academic)
    You implied as if it weren't second-rate:

    "It's the word 'otherwise' that gets me. Nothing against UEL, it's a good uni for some subjects, but most people already consider it second rate."

    You sound fascinated. Of course most people already consider it second rate! The others don't even rate it...
    It's open to interpretation, I grant you. I wouldn't hold it up with Imperial, but UEL has more going for it than people give it credit for.
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    Nobody would have to charge £9k per year if it weren't for this wacko fee waiver system for poorer students. Last time I checked the cost of providing lectures/tutorials/labs to a student wasn't a function of their parental income...
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    (Original post by Butane)
    Nobody would have to charge £9k per year if it weren't for this wacko fee waiver system for poorer students. Last time I checked the cost of providing lectures/tutorials/labs to a student wasn't a function of their parental income...


    Last time I checked, the cost of providing living accomdations, food, and other neccesities was a function of their parental income...:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Junaid16)
    [/B]

    Last time I checked, the cost of providing living accomdations, food, and other neccesities was a function of their parental income...:rolleyes:
    Last time I checked, tuition fees covered tuition, not maintenance.
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    (Original post by im so academic)

    http://www.innertemple.org.uk/index....2&limitstart=2

    You will also, of course, need to work hard to achieve the best grades possible. Aspiring barristers should focus on getting the best grades in challenging subjects that are of interest to them. Your ability in those courses could not only affect your chances of receiving an offer of a place at university, particularly at the most selective universities, but also your professional progression in a range of careers later in life.

    The Bar is a competitive profession and you will need to demonstrate that you have excelled academically in your school and at university. Some Chambers and Employed Bar institutions look back to your school grades to assess your application compared to the many other outstanding applicants.

    Increasing competition has meant that the majority of pupillage positions are offered to those with at least an upper second class honours in their undergraduate degrees and high A-level grades. Chambers may consider exceptional candidates outside this range but you should remember that you will be competing with those of high academic merit.

    http://prospectus.lmu.ac.uk/main/det...6&attendance=1

    UCAS Tariff Points: 260 points

    260 points is not exactly "high academic merit" or of "high A-level grades". Sure, someone could go to do Leeds Met law with AAA, but really?
    Not one single fact in there.
    Good job on googling btw.

    You gave a rubbish source. Any website offering advice on entering a certain proffession, or applying for degree's in general, are going to tell you you need to do the best you can in order to succeed.
    Unfortunately, this is not true.

    Come back when you have a few more years, and real university experience, under your belt
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    (Original post by MM1234)
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-12879817

    Leeds Metropolitan has become the first of the newer, less selective group of universities to officially announce its new fee level.

    Announcing the fee level, the chair of the board at Leeds Metropolitan University, Lord Woolmer of Leeds, said: "We are totally committed to providing a high quality student experience.
    It's easy to ***** and moan at the Universities for charging such high fees, but this is merely a result of the massive funding cuts (70-100%) doled out by the government.

    With the larger cuts typically hitting the 'worse' Universities.
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    http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/liver...0252-28425528/
    It just gets better and better. They say if they don't charge max they will have to close down.... well by charging max they are going to close down anyway as very few people are going to pay 9000 to go to JMU.
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    (Original post by Wezzler)
    http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/liver...0252-28425528/
    It just gets better and better. They say if they don't charge max they will have to close down.... well by charging max they are going to close down anyway as very few people are going to pay 9000 to go to JMU.
    I'd pay 9k to go anywhere, if that's where i really wanted to go.

    Why?
    OH ye, cuz i'd be paying it off at a very small rate with no designated interest rate.. awesome.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    That's a pointless statement. It's like saying doing BA Events Management is better than no degree if you intend to be a doctor or a barrister or an engineer. :rolleyes:

    That also doesn't justify the (lack of) worth of said degrees.

    So helping to provide one of the largest growing industries in the UK, if not the world, a better understanding of how to increase its sustainability and more importantly its health and safety standards (among others) is worthless?

    Last time I checked, making sure the appropriate steps are taken to protect people from harm was far from worthless.
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    (Original post by llys)
    Because many students won't have this option, either because they have to go to a local university (for personal reasons), because their course is not offered elsewhere, or because they don't meet the entry requirements for a "better" university.


    You say you did your "first degree" there. Are you now doing a second undergraduate degree elsewhere? How do the two universities compare in your experience? I.e. with respect to contact time, teaching, facilities, .. ? Do you think that at your new university you are really getting MUCH better value for money?
    I am doing a PG Dip at King's...I realise it's not top 10 but it's 10 times better than Leeds Met with everything, even things like course admin - at Leeds Met some tutors even forgot to show up to their own lectures! :rolleyes:

    A lot of doors can be closed automatically because of the (poor) uni you went to, if you spent the same amount of money at a better uni this might not necessarily be the case? As for not meeting entry requirements, what prevents you from trying harder if you really want it?

    I don't pay fees but given a choice between going to Leeds Met or Leeds uni up the road I would take the latter, I just think you might as well aim high nowadays if you're going to spend £25k+ on fees alone, that is unless the course is unique and will lead to employment in your chosen area. A lot of people from my degree are now working in supermarkets, something I wouldn't want with that amount of debt.
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    (Original post by TikiTiki)
    spent the same amount of money at a better uni this might not necessarily be the case? As for not meeting entry requirements, what prevents you from trying harder if you really want it?
    Not everyone can get better grades. No matter how hard they work.
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    (Original post by Butane)
    Last time I checked, tuition fees covered tuition, not maintenance.
    True. But I think the surplus income from higher tuition fees also can (IMO, should) be used on maintenance bursaries, not only tuition fee waivers.

    It would make a lot more sense, because I think I read somewhere that the maximum value of the maintenance grant has been cut and is no longer enough to live on (if it ever was)... it seems to me that if anything, this is what is going to put poor students off, rather than high tuition fees that they won't have to pay up front anyway.
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    I understand that, but it irritates me that a uni who have a student body with poorer backgrounds, and such low entry requirements, is charging such high fees. I wonder how many applicants they'll get next year.

    I chose the uni mainly for geographical reasons, but I would have to think long and hard about it if I were to apply again as in my opinion the high fees aren't worth it.
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    (Original post by TikiTiki)
    A lot of doors can be closed automatically because of the (poor) uni you went to, if you spent the same amount of money at a better uni this might not necessarily be the case? As for not meeting entry requirements, what prevents you from trying harder if you really want it?

    I don't pay fees but given a choice between going to Leeds Met or Leeds uni up the road I would take the latter, I just think you might as well aim high nowadays if you're going to spend £25k+ on fees alone, that is unless the course is unique and will lead to employment in your chosen area. A lot of people from my degree are now working in supermarkets, something I wouldn't want with that amount of debt.
    There are clever people and not so clever people. We all know this, I think; or do you disagree on this?

    Of course everyone would want to go to the best possible university for their course. But not everyone is able to, because universities are (rightly) selective. (Also not every course is offered at every uni. And no, British businesses do not currently offer apprenticeships that would make some of these courses redundant, so that is not a viable alternative either at the moment.) That's all I'm saying really.
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    (Original post by TikiTiki)
    I understand that, but it irritates me that a uni who have a student body with poorer backgrounds, and such low entry requirements, is charging such high fees. I wonder how many applicants they'll get next year.

    I chose the uni mainly for geographical reasons, but I would have to think long and hard about it if I were to apply again as in my opinion the high fees aren't worth it.
    I can understand your irritation. And maybe the fees are not "worth it" (for the government - if they aren't worth it for the student, the student won't have to pay them back, so it's no big loss for the student, whereas the government/tax-payer always pays).

    But I'm pretty sure applicants won't care that much once the tuition fee excitement has blown over. We'll see.
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    (Original post by llys)
    There are clever people and not so clever people. We all know this, I think; or do you disagree on this?

    Of course everyone would want to go to the best possible university for their course. But not everyone is able to, because universities are (rightly) selective. (Also not every course is offered at every uni. And no, British businesses do not currently offer apprenticeships that would make some of these courses redundant, so that is not a viable alternative either at the moment.) That's all I'm saying really.
    I do see your point

    If Leeds Met were still charging less than £3k I wouldn't have a problem at all! I just think it's a shame if, in the future, someone graduates from a lesser university with a very high level of debt but is restricted in terms of employment and career prospects because they went to a uni with less of a reputation than others - as I said, uni rep can close a lot of doors/career options. I might then think my degree had been a waste of money.
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    I can't wait to hear what Huddersfield are going to charge. There's no way I would pay £8,500 to study at Leeds Met.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    You implied as if it weren't second-rate:

    "It's the word 'otherwise' that gets me. Nothing against UEL, it's a good uni for some subjects, but most people already consider it second rate."

    You sound fascinated. Of course most people already consider it second rate! The others don't even rate it...
    No, the post was stating that it was relatively out of place for the word 'otherwise' to be used, as it implies that UEL had a high reputation to begin with that would otherwise become damaged, failing a fees hike. You were in agreement with them.
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    (Original post by TikiTiki)
    A lot of people from my degree are now working in supermarkets, something I wouldn't want with that amount of debt.
    A lot of people doing your degree didn't need a degree 10 years ago. I'm not attacking your degree, but that's the fault of the government and the NHS(for nursing that is). In accounting, you need qualifications to get where you want, but degrees filter out the mass amounts of people wanting the job. The same applies for computing, and my degree(part of computing). At the moment, I could technically go for the qualifications route, but I can see myself needing a degree in around 5 years time, because of the fact that you need a degree for pretty much every professional job now

    Before, you could just work your way up. Now, companies either expect you to know everything first or they can't afford to train you
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    It's open to interpretation, I grant you. I wouldn't hold it up with Imperial, but UEL has more going for it than people give it credit for.
    Please justify UEL's supposedly underrated OVERALL reputation then.
 
 
 
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