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Leeds Met will not charge £9000, but £8,500 fees watch

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    (Original post by Tommyjw)
    Not one single fact in there.
    Good job on googling btw.

    You gave a rubbish source. Any website offering advice on entering a certain proffession, or applying for degree's in general, are going to tell you you need to do the best you can in order to succeed.
    Unfortunately, this is not true.

    Come back when you have a few more years, and real university experience, under your belt
    What have you got to justify your points?
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    (Original post by Wezzler)
    http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/liver...0252-28425528/
    It just gets better and better. They say if they don't charge max they will have to close down.... well by charging max they are going to close down anyway as very few people are going to pay 9000 to go to JMU.
    :rofl: £27,000 for a JMU degree? No thanks.
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    (Original post by Evacuate)
    So helping to provide one of the largest growing industries in the UK, if not the world, a better understanding of how to increase its sustainability and more importantly its health and safety standards (among others) is worthless?

    Last time I checked, making sure the appropriate steps are taken to protect people from harm was far from worthless.
    Wait, since when did you NEED a BA in Events Management to do that?
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    (Original post by WelshBluebird)
    Not everyone can get better grades. No matter how hard they work.
    That would imply they are not academically able and thus SHOULD NOT BE GOING TO UNIVERSITY.

    You're telling me it's acceptable for a CCD grade student to go to university?
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    (Original post by TikiTiki)
    I do see your point

    If Leeds Met were still charging less than £3k I wouldn't have a problem at all! I just think it's a shame if, in the future, someone graduates from a lesser university with a very high level of debt but is restricted in terms of employment and career prospects because they went to a uni with less of a reputation than others - as I said, uni rep can close a lot of doors/career options. I might then think my degree had been a waste of money.
    It's not a shame. It's bloody obvious that generally speaking, go to a lesser university could potentially restrict you in terms of employment and career prospects.
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    (Original post by de_monies)
    A lot of people doing your degree didn't need a degree 10 years ago. I'm not attacking your degree, but that's the fault of the government and the NHS(for nursing that is). In accounting, you need qualifications to get where you want, but degrees filter out the mass amounts of people wanting the job. The same applies for computing, and my degree(part of computing). At the moment, I could technically go for the qualifications route, but I can see myself needing a degree in around 5 years time, because of the fact that you need a degree for pretty much every professional job now

    Before, you could just work your way up. Now, companies either expect you to know everything first or they can't afford to train you
    My UG degree was in psychology, and I'm now doing a PG diploma in nursing.
    I don't believe it's necessary for people studying primarily vocational subjects to have a degree (like nurses, although I'm in two minds about this) as most of the learning is on the job - although I would hate it in future if nurses were considered for a job based on the university they went to, in the long run in this field I would imagine it has little relevance.
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    (Original post by WelshBluebird)
    Firsty, a degree doesn't always have to relate to the career you want to do. Just having a degree is enough to get your foot in the door. (obviously not for being a doctor etc etc). Someone can do Law, and not fancy pursuing a legal career.
    Why are there so many graduates on the dole then?

    Secondly, it isn't pointless. You questioned the worth of going to a place like leeds met in comparison to not going to uni at all. In reality, as long as you get a decent mark (1st or a 2.1) in a decent course (which History and Law are), then you ARE in a better position than someone who didn't get a degree full stop.
    Again, why are some graduates on the dole?
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    .
    You're so annoying,
    1) do you actually go out? - you seem to be on here constantly
    2) shut up.
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    (Original post by TikiTiki)
    My UG degree was in psychology, and I'm now doing a PG diploma in nursing.
    I don't believe it's necessary for people studying primarily vocational subjects to have a degree (like nurses, although I'm in two minds about this)
    You may think this, but the NHS doesn't think so(generally) What I've heard(from people who've had words with hospitals), is that you need a degree in nursing before you can do any thing. Also, there's my friends mum who tells him that before you could come out at the age of 16(or 18), and train to be a nurse. Now every single nurse is a university graduate
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    8.5K is not worth it for a Leeds Met degree. It's barely worth it for a degree from a "prestigious" uni like Manchester or somewhere.

    What a joke!
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Wait, since when did you NEED a BA in Events Management to do that?
    I never said that it was needed.

    The point I'm making is that by having more professionally accredited people active in the industry, the standards of factors such as health + safety and sustainability are bound to increase with them, its more a case of what skills and awareness a degree brings to the industry.

    I'm talking mainly large events here as my background is commercial music festivals.

    A continuing professional development scheme is being sought after with regards to this, so by entering into a formal qualification route at this stage could future proof my job prospects, even if it isn't a standardized requirement at this moment in time, as at the end of the day, what is a degree if not an investment?

    I just think its hardly fair to say that its worthless, as it quite clearly has significant worth to both the industry's skill base and to those looking to break into the sector.

    My original point was that given what I've said above, Leeds Metropolitan University currently offers the best prospects for this and the department is currently regarded as the UK Centre for Events Management.
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    (Original post by Evacuate)
    I never said that it was needed.

    The point I'm making is that by having more professionally accredited people active in the industry, the standards of factors such as health + safety and sustainability are bound to increase with them, its more a case of what skills and awareness a degree brings to the industry.

    I'm talking mainly large events here as my background is commercial music festivals.

    A continuing professional development scheme is being sought after with regards to this, so by entering into a formal qualification route at this stage could future proof my job prospects, even if it isn't a standardized requirement at this moment in time, as at the end of the day, what is a degree if not an investment?

    I just think its hardly fair to say that its worthless, as it quite clearly has significant worth to both the industry's skill base and to those looking to break into the sector.

    My original point was that given what I've said above, Leeds Metropolitan University currently offers the best prospects for this and the department is currently regarded as the UK Centre for Events Management.
    OK, give me some hardcore evidence that BA Events Management is a worthwhile degree, as opposed to anecdotes.

    I couldn't give a **** if it were the UK Centre for Underwater Basket Weaving, it doesn't change my opinion of it.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    I couldn't give a **** if it were the UK Centre for Underwater Basket Weaving, it doesn't change my opinion of it.
    It wouldn't surprise me if some crappy uni started that course
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    :rofl: £27,000 for a JMU degree? No thanks.
    You forgot to factor in living costs, Oxbridge will never have you now :no:
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    (Original post by Funkss!)
    You forgot to factor in living costs, Oxbridge will never have you now :no:
    http://www.ox.ac.uk/media/news_relea.../110315_1.html
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    I'm not quite sure why you posted that.. Has JMU turned into Oxford now or something?
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    OK, give me some hardcore evidence that BA Events Management is a worthwhile degree, as opposed to anecdotes.

    I couldn't give a **** if it were the UK Centre for Underwater Basket Weaving, it doesn't change my opinion of it.
    I'm not trying to change your opinion, far from it - I'm merely defending my own, all I did was offer my own experience at Leeds Met to add to the discussion, I wasn't disputing anyone's views in the process.

    There are few positions at the moment that have a degree in Events Management as a requirement, granted, but I've already stated that I'm looking at the future of the industry.

    More importantly than that, though, I wanted to get into the organisation of music festivals, but hadn't any experience what so ever. Yeah I could have volunteered to gain the skills I'd need and develop them through, but to me, an educational course that included a year in industry, networking opportunities and a formal qualification at the end of it seemed the best option for me.

    People can think i'm a lunatic for getting a degree in it for all I care, it's taught me the skills I need to start my career doing something that I actually enjoy, and that justifies it's worth to me.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    OK, give me some hardcore evidence that BA Events Management is a worthwhile degree, as opposed to anecdotes.

    I couldn't give a **** if it were the UK Centre for Underwater Basket Weaving, it doesn't change my opinion of it.
    (Original post by De Montfort)

    • The BA (Hons) Arts and Festivals Management degree at De Montfort University has a fantastic pedigree. It’s the longest running degree course of its kind in the UK (established in 1979) with an excellent reputation for the quality of its graduates amongst employers in the industry and other academic institutions.
    • Join a network of over 600 graduates who are now working for the BBC, MTV, Ballet Rambert, Royal National Theatre, Top Drawer Music, Arts Council, Wembley Arena, West Yorkshire Playhouse, Foundation for Community Dance and many more.
    • The course has excellent links to the industry giving you top quality teaching from industry practitioners with practical placements. Placements have recently included Chicago Symphony Orchestra, National Trust properties, The Cavern in Liverpool, Nottingham Playhouse, IKON and Frieze Art Fair and Glastonbury.
    • You will have the opportunity to organise and run your own venue within the Leicester Comedy Festival, and then contribute to the nationally recognised week-long, Cultural Exchanges festival


    That's the rationale from the DMU site, to give one example. It's not investment banking, but it's not that deplorable a career choice, surely?
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    (Original post by llys)
    True. But I think the surplus income from higher tuition fees also can (IMO, should) be used on maintenance bursaries, not only tuition fee waivers.

    It would make a lot more sense, because I think I read somewhere that the maximum value of the maintenance grant has been cut and is no longer enough to live on (if it ever was)... it seems to me that if anything, this is what is going to put poor students off, rather than high tuition fees that they won't have to pay up front anyway.
    Increased maintenance support would have been a much more sensible option rather than lowering tuition fees for poorer students (seeing as these aren't paid back until the students are earning >21k, by which point their pre-graduation parental income has no effect whatsoever on their ability to pay the loan off), but unfortunately we're dealing with a bunch of politicians who paid sod all for their university education and thus have no idea of the financial burden it now carries.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Why are there so many graduates on the dole then?

    Again, why are some graduates on the dole?
    Because have just been in a recession, a huge economic **** up, and many people are finding it hard to get jobs, not just graduates.

    And again, if graduates are having a hard time finding a job, imagine how hard it would be if you didn't have any degree at all?

    (Original post by im so academic)
    That would imply they are not academically able and thus SHOULD NOT BE GOING TO UNIVERSITY.

    You're telling me it's acceptable for a CCD grade student to go to university?
    That is debatable really.
    University has become much more than just about academics.
    You may not like that, but it has happened.
    Employers are asking workers to have degrees when before they wouldn't have asked for one.
    Thus university has become an extension to a young persons normal education.

    (Original post by TikiTiki)
    I don't believe it's necessary for people studying primarily vocational subjects to have a degree
    Well the employers disagree with you.
 
 
 
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