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    (Original post by TheRockMaster)
    E-mail me your address and I will see what I can do! (PM)
    it wud be reli gr8 if u could post the essays on this thread plzzz

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    (Original post by StudentToday)
    it wud be reli gr8 if u could post the essays on this thread plzzz

    x
    What is the relationship between sexual selection and human reproductive behaviour.doc

    Outline and evaluate two or more biological explanations of schizophrenia.doc

    Here you go...don't know if they are the same topics as the ones you are doing but hopefully they will be of some use.
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    (Original post by TheRockMaster)
    What is the relationship between sexual selection and human reproductive behaviour.doc

    Outline and evaluate two or more biological explanations of schizophrenia.doc

    Here you go...don't know if they are the same topics as the ones you are doing but hopefully they will be of some use.
    Thnk u soo much. r they both A grades and were they both done within the 30 minute time frame??
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    (Original post by StudentToday)
    Thnk u soo much. r they both A grades and were they both done within the 30 minute time frame??
    Both A grade and not done in 30min time frame but you can break it down. Basically look at the part where I have introduced the topic- it was very short. Then go into the research straight away, which supports the topic. Then you have to basically go for all methadology after research. All in all for one explanation you should be looking at 15mins. 1min intro, 10 research and evaluation and the remaining 4 mins for A03 marks.

    All in all you need a well balanced argument. Try not to overload with info. Keep it to 2-3 studies but alot of commentry which builds an argument.

    hope this helps.
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    (Original post by TheRockMaster)
    Both A grade and not done in 30min time frame but you can break it down. Basically look at the part where I have introduced the topic- it was very short. Then go into the research straight away, which supports the topic. Then you have to basically go for all methadology after research. All in all for one explanation you should be looking at 15mins. 1min intro, 10 research and evaluation and the remaining 4 mins for A03 marks.

    All in all you need a well balanced argument. Try not to overload with info. Keep it to 2-3 studies but alot of commentry which builds an argument.

    hope this helps.
    I posted this essay earlier n it wud b gr8 if u cud give me feedback coz i think its quite different to how ur essays are. this is how i normally structure my essays though this esssy took about 35 mins.

    Discuss the role of genes and hormones in gender development. (25 Marks)
    According to the Biological approach, gender development is influenced and controlled by genetics that encode for hormones. The biological approach stresses the importance that gender occurs as a result of nature rather than nurture. It is thought that gender related behaviour is influenced by an over or under exposure to sex hormones (androgens and oestrogen). Research has been carried out to investigate the effects of genes and hormones on gender development.

    Young (1966) has shown the effects of over exposure of the opposite sex hormones on sexual behaviour of rats. Female rats arch over during sexual activity and male rats mount the female rats. However, Young injected the female rates with androgens (male hormones) and injected oestrogen (female hormones) into the male rates during a critical period of development. The rat’s behaviours were observed and showed an opposite in behaviours. The female rats now tried to mount the male rats and the male rats arch over. This therefore shows that hormones affect gender behaviour and development. However, it is important to remember that the study was done on non-humans and so cannot be generalised to humans, despite rats being genetically similar to humans. Although, the use of non-human participants allows for independent variables to be systematically manipulated providing reliable data.

    Money (1972) used a case study to support the idea that hormones affected gender development. Money studied a group of girls that had been exposed to high levels of testosterone ‘in utero’ through anti miscarriage drugs. These girls were compared to their non-exposed sisters and their mothers were asked to comment on their behaviour and choice of toys/clothes. A difference was reported, with the exposed girls being reported as more boyish with a higher IQ. This suggests that exposure to high levels of androgens had affected their gender development. Nevertheless, it has been suggested that the questions were misleading such as ‘Which of your daughters are more boyish’ suggesting that one of them has to be boyish. A follow up study found only one difference – the exposed girls were more active. Hines also disagreed with Moneys findings and so carried out a study examining play shown by girls and boys aged 3-8 years who had congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH – When embryos are exposed to high levels of androgens). Hines found minor differences, except girls preferred playing with boys, which suggests that hormones had little effect on behaviour.

    Deady (2006) looked at the relationship between gender role orientation and testosterone levels in ‘child free’ women to support the importance of hormones. Deady asked participants to complete Bems SRI Questionnaire and answer questions about their desire for children. Results showed a correlation of the higher testosterone levels found in saliva, the lower the females desire for children. This suggests that the high levels of testosterone are related to a low maternal drive. However, the study revealed a correlation which is not a causal finding.

    However, the biological approach in general has been criticised for being generally deterministic and reductionist and does not take into account the influence of the environment and social interactions which may be best explained by other theories.

    Alternately, the biosocial approach may be more appropriate as it takes into account the interaction between the genetics and the environment. The social constructive theory forms the biosocial approach and argues that gender is formed through social construction that changes over time and culture through language. It suggests that masculinity and femininity are not fixed and can be shown in various ways. This idea has been supported by Mac and Connell (1995) who identified different groups of masculinity in a British school. They found that there were the ‘High Achievers’, ‘Macho Lads’, ‘New Entrepreneurs’ and ‘Real Englishmen’ which all showed masculinity as a result of social construction. The biosocial theory is more appropriate because it takes into account both biological and social influences.

    In conclusion, the research described and evaluated above does show support for the idea that genetic coding for hormones does affect our gender development and therefore behaviour. On the other hand, it has also been shown that some of the studies have methodological flaws and have been criticised by further research suggesting the results are not as they seem. Perhaps also, gender development is better explained by the biosocial approach due to being less deterministic and fixed.
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    (Original post by StudentToday)
    I posted this essay earlier n it wud b gr8 if u cud give me feedback coz i think its quite different to how ur essays are. this is how i normally structure my essays though this esssy took about 35 mins.

    Discuss the role of genes and hormones in gender development. (25 Marks)
    According to the Biological approach, gender development is influenced and controlled by genetics that encode for hormones. The biological approach stresses the importance that gender occurs as a result of nature rather than nurture. It is thought that gender related behaviour is influenced by an over or under exposure to sex hormones (androgens and oestrogen). Research has been carried out to investigate the effects of genes and hormones on gender development.

    Young (1966) has shown the effects of over exposure of the opposite sex hormones on sexual behaviour of rats. Female rats arch over during sexual activity and male rats mount the female rats. However, Young injected the female rates with androgens (male hormones) and injected oestrogen (female hormones) into the male rates during a critical period of development. The rat’s behaviours were observed and showed an opposite in behaviours. The female rats now tried to mount the male rats and the male rats arch over. This therefore shows that hormones affect gender behaviour and development. However, it is important to remember that the study was done on non-humans and so cannot be generalised to humans, despite rats being genetically similar to humans. Although, the use of non-human participants allows for independent variables to be systematically manipulated providing reliable data.

    Money (1972) used a case study to support the idea that hormones affected gender development. Money studied a group of girls that had been exposed to high levels of testosterone ‘in utero’ through anti miscarriage drugs. These girls were compared to their non-exposed sisters and their mothers were asked to comment on their behaviour and choice of toys/clothes. A difference was reported, with the exposed girls being reported as more boyish with a higher IQ. This suggests that exposure to high levels of androgens had affected their gender development. Nevertheless, it has been suggested that the questions were misleading such as ‘Which of your daughters are more boyish’ suggesting that one of them has to be boyish. A follow up study found only one difference – the exposed girls were more active. Hines also disagreed with Moneys findings and so carried out a study examining play shown by girls and boys aged 3-8 years who had congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH – When embryos are exposed to high levels of androgens). Hines found minor differences, except girls preferred playing with boys, which suggests that hormones had little effect on behaviour.

    Deady (2006) looked at the relationship between gender role orientation and testosterone levels in ‘child free’ women to support the importance of hormones. Deady asked participants to complete Bems SRI Questionnaire and answer questions about their desire for children. Results showed a correlation of the higher testosterone levels found in saliva, the lower the females desire for children. This suggests that the high levels of testosterone are related to a low maternal drive. However, the study revealed a correlation which is not a causal finding.

    However, the biological approach in general has been criticised for being generally deterministic and reductionist and does not take into account the influence of the environment and social interactions which may be best explained by other theories.

    Alternately, the biosocial approach may be more appropriate as it takes into account the interaction between the genetics and the environment. The social constructive theory forms the biosocial approach and argues that gender is formed through social construction that changes over time and culture through language. It suggests that masculinity and femininity are not fixed and can be shown in various ways. This idea has been supported by Mac and Connell (1995) who identified different groups of masculinity in a British school. They found that there were the ‘High Achievers’, ‘Macho Lads’, ‘New Entrepreneurs’ and ‘Real Englishmen’ which all showed masculinity as a result of social construction. The biosocial theory is more appropriate because it takes into account both biological and social influences.

    In conclusion, the research described and evaluated above does show support for the idea that genetic coding for hormones does affect our gender development and therefore behaviour. On the other hand, it has also been shown that some of the studies have methodological flaws and have been criticised by further research suggesting the results are not as they seem. Perhaps also, gender development is better explained by the biosocial approach due to being less deterministic and fixed.
    From what I can see directly is that you will get full A01 and A03 marks. But it lacks methodology. I do not do this topic but I think you need to look at the case studies and look at things like ethical issues, validity and reliability. General points which make the case study good or bad. Outline the strengths and weaknesses further
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    (Original post by TheRockMaster)
    From what I can see directly is that you will get full A01 and A03 marks. But it lacks methodology. I do not do this topic but I think you need to look at the case studies and look at things like ethical issues, validity and reliability. General points which make the case study good or bad. Outline the strengths and weaknesses further
    Ok will do, thnxs for the feedbak
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    RIGHT, going to actually kick start my revision tomorrow!
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    (Original post by teaandcoffee)
    RIGHT, going to actually kick start my revision tomorrow!
    Hi, i've noticed that you done reallllly well on your Unit 4 Exam!(congrats!) Is there any possible tips you could provide for me in terms of the structure of answering a Q, I would be very appreciative if you could!
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    (Original post by StudentToday)
    I posted this essay earlier n it wud b gr8 if u cud give me feedback coz i think its quite different to how ur essays are. this is how i normally structure my essays though this esssy took about 35 mins.

    Discuss the role of genes and hormones in gender development. (25 Marks)
    According to the Biological approach, gender development is influenced and controlled by genetics that encode for hormones. The biological approach stresses the importance that gender occurs as a result of nature rather than nurture. It is thought that gender related behaviour is influenced by an over or under exposure to sex hormones (androgens and oestrogen). Research has been carried out to investigate the effects of genes and hormones on gender development.

    Young (1966) has shown the effects of over exposure of the opposite sex hormones on sexual behaviour of rats. Female rats arch over during sexual activity and male rats mount the female rats. However, Young injected the female rates with androgens (male hormones) and injected oestrogen (female hormones) into the male rates during a critical period of development. The rat’s behaviours were observed and showed an opposite in behaviours. The female rats now tried to mount the male rats and the male rats arch over. This therefore shows that hormones affect gender behaviour and development.

    However, it is important to remember that the study was done on non-humans and so cannot be generalised to humans, despite rats being genetically similar to humans. Although, the use of non-human participants allows for independent variables to be systematically manipulated providing reliable data.
    The term for using animals in a study is called 'extrapolation' - try and include it as it is key terminology.

    Money (1972) used a case study to support the idea that hormones affected gender development. Money studied a group of girls that had been exposed to high levels of testosterone ‘in utero’ through anti miscarriage drugs. These girls were compared to their non-exposed sisters and their mothers were asked to comment on their behaviour and choice of toys/clothes. A difference was reported, with the exposed girls being reported as more boyish with a higher IQ. This suggests that exposure to high levels of androgens had affected their gender development. < Good link to the question I'd say!

    Nevertheless, it has been suggested that the questions were misleading such as ‘Which of your daughters are more boyish’ suggesting that one of them has to be boyish. A follow up study found only one difference – the exposed girls were more active. Hines also disagreed with Moneys findings and so carried out a study examining play shown by girls and boys aged 3-8 years who had congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH – When embryos are exposed to high levels of androgens). Hines found minor differences, except girls preferred playing with boys, which suggests that hormones had little effect on behaviour.
    Another good link to the question

    Deady (2006) looked at the relationship between gender role orientation and testosterone levels in ‘child free’ women to support the importance of hormones. Deady asked participants to complete Bems SRI Questionnaire and answer questions about their desire for children. Results showed a correlation of the higher testosterone levels found in saliva, the lower the females desire for children. This suggests that the high levels of testosterone are related to a low maternal drive. However, the study revealed a correlation which is not a causal finding. Could possibly add, however, as it was a correlational analysis it maybe hard to establish a cause and effect etc.

    However, the biological approach in general has been criticised for being generally deterministic and reductionist and does not take into account the influence of the environment and social interactions which may be best explained by other theories.

    Alternately, the biosocial approach may be more appropriate as it takes into account the interaction between the genetics and the environment. The social constructive theory forms the biosocial approach and argues that gender is formed through social construction that changes over time and culture through language. It suggests that masculinity and femininity are not fixed and can be shown in various ways. This idea has been supported by Mac and Connell (1995) who identified different groups of masculinity in a British school. They found that there were the ‘High Achievers’, ‘Macho Lads’, ‘New Entrepreneurs’ and ‘Real Englishmen’ which all showed masculinity as a result of social construction. The biosocial theory is more appropriate because it takes into account both biological and social influences. The Biosocial approach is a complete different question - although this is good stuff, the biosocial approach is a whole different topic. This is asking you just on genes and hormones.

    In conclusion, the research described and evaluated above does show support for the idea that genetic coding for hormones does affect our gender development and therefore behaviour. On the other hand, it has also been shown that some of the studies have methodological flaws and have been criticised by further research suggesting the results are not as they seem. Perhaps also, gender development is better explained by the biosocial approach due to being less deterministic and fixed.
    :-)
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    how did you post your essay..i tried to do mine but it said it had to be 100 characters
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    (Original post by FJ1994)
    how did you post your essay..i tried to do mine but it said it had to be 100 characters
    You can always click on the little paper clip or go for the advanced reply and then either attach or paste
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    (Original post by safwaansh)
    doing this exam for the first time.

    - gender
    - aggression
    - sleep disorders

    does anyone know if we need evaluation points for sleep disorders apart from insomnia? the textbooks barely have anything!

    i know it says on one of the past papers mark scheme that you can evaluate the sleep disorders just by saying how effective the therapy is etc but most of the evaluation points are still for insomnia!
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    (Original post by justiceisjust)
    :-)
    thnx 4 the feedbak
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    (Original post by FJ1994)
    how did you post your essay..i tried to do mine but it said it had to be 100 characters
    ijust copied and pasted it into the quick replay box - didnt say anything about being 100 characters :confused:
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    (Original post by Kerry92)
    i know it says on one of the past papers mark scheme that you can evaluate the sleep disorders just by saying how effective the therapy is etc but most of the evaluation points are still for insomnia!
    yes you need to evaluate sleep disorders, this could also include evaluating the diferent approaches, For example there is a biological approach to insomnia and a psychological approach
    you can comment on how it may be reductionist/deterministic and how it has implications for the law - I.e people can use sleep walking as an excuse for murder (IDA)

    for narcolepsy you can find research that has investigated the role of Orexin and HLA

    if you do know the therapy then you can evaluate it, but you should keep relating it back, saying how it supports/dosent support the theory of the disorder.
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    Hi guys, I'm doing
    Relationships
    Intelligence in learning
    Cognitive Development
    doesn't really seem like lot of people do the last two:/?
    Its my first time doing A2 paper this summer and its the last chance ahhh!!
    So scared, I wonder if revision from now will be enough... Good luck to all of you!
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    (Original post by popthecorn)
    Hi guys, I'm doing
    Relationships
    Intelligence in learning
    Cognitive Development
    doesn't really seem like lot of people do the last two:/?
    Its my first time doing A2 paper this summer and its the last chance ahhh!!
    So scared, I wonder if revision from now will be enough... Good luck to all of you!
    Hey,

    totally different subjects to you but still scared either way!

    Last chance...get a B or dont go uni! scary thought :eek:
    But yeah good luck to you to
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    (Original post by StudentFDot)
    Hi, i've noticed that you done reallllly well on your Unit 4 Exam!(congrats!) Is there any possible tips you could provide for me in terms of the structure of answering a Q, I would be very appreciative if you could!
    Haha

    Erm... honestly I have no idea. I don't really know how to describe how I answer the essays/structure them as when I did my retake and got 99 UMS in unit 4, I did it all by myself without a teacher.

    I'm really sorry I can't be anymore help!
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    (Original post by Kerry92)
    i know it says on one of the past papers mark scheme that you can evaluate the sleep disorders just by saying how effective the therapy is etc but most of the evaluation points are still for insomnia!
    it's so annoying! i've got enough notes on every other section but apart from insomnia the textbooks barely comment on the other disorders with regards to AO2. Knowing my luck, they'll be a question on sleep disorders.
 
 
 
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