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    Just heard that the European Commission has said that Petrol and Diesel Cars should be banned from City Centres in European Cities by 2050.

    What would you think about cars being banned from British cities, particularly London?

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    Personally, I'm going to throw it out there and say that i think it might be a good idea. I still cannot understand why the use of cars is so widespread in Central London. Cars are always slower than bicycles/motorbikes/mopeds round London. On a road bike, you can manage an easy 20 mph average, in a 30 mph limit. Cars are very expensive to run-in town you might only manage 20-30 mpg. And the biggest risk to bicycles are busses and trucks. They produce congestion which slows everyone down, including bikes If only motorbikes, bicycles and tube were allowed, transport would be cheaper, faster, safer, cleaner.

    I'm not a big environmentalists, I'm more interested in the practicalities. But it makes sense to me.
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    If their public transport system was great, I wouldn't mind cars being banned. Until then NO WAY.
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    Presumably cars will use different technology by 2050. They'll still be prolific but just not fossil fuelled.
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    (Original post by bj_945)
    Just heard that the European Commission has said that Petrol and Diesel Cars should be banned from City Centres in European Cities by 2050.

    What would you think about cars being banned from British cities, particularly London?

    ----------

    Personally, I'm going to throw it out there and say that i think it might be a good idea. I still cannot understand why the use of cars is so widespread in Central London. Cars are always slower than bicycles/motorbikes/mopeds round London. On a road bike, you can manage an easy 20 mph average, in a 30 mph limit. Cars are very expensive to run-in town you might only manage 20-30 mpg. And the biggest risk to bicycles are busses and trucks. They produce congestion which slows everyone down, including bikes If only motorbikes, bicycles and tube were allowed, transport would be cheaper, faster, safer, cleaner.

    I'm not a big environmentalists, I'm more interested in the practicalities. But it makes sense to me.
    most of this i agree with - such as londoners travelling to work by car in a area of the city. pure laziness.
    for those travelling to, say, central london from far away it is more difficult situation....

    best cure to me would be to acquire the ability of teleportation...........
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    It seemed a good idea at first, but thinking of some scenarios...

    - You're disabled
    - Family with very young children

    It just seems impractical to ban them altogether
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    What if you want to move something that you can't carry for more than 10 yards?
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    (Original post by Fission_Mailed)
    What if you want to move something that you can't carry for more than 10 yards?
    It's referring to petrol and diesel cars. By 2050, technology will have moved on considerably - electric powered cars (either battery or hydrogen fuel cell or some other technology) will have advanced sufficiently for cars like that to be economically and practically viable en mass.
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    (Original post by Fission_Mailed)
    What if you want to move something that you can't carry for more than 10 yards?
    Yeh, I know, I thought about that. That is probs one of the few useful uses of cars inner city.
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    (Original post by Manitude)
    It's referring to petrol and diesel cars. By 2050, technology will have moved on considerably - electric powered cars (either battery or hydrogen fuel cell or some other technology) will have advanced sufficiently for cars like that to be economically and practically viable en mass.
    Hopefully it will. Otherwise my grandkids are going to have to find a way to balance a double wardrobe between two bikes.


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    OK, I'll admit it; I didn't read the OP properly.
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    (Original post by muffingg)
    If their public transport system was great, I wouldn't mind cars being banned. Until then NO WAY.
    Public transport is pretty decent in central London.

    Would the ban include taxis? OMG, no!
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    (Original post by NOBODY MOVE!)
    most of this i agree with - such as londoners travelling to work by car in a area of the city. pure laziness.
    .
    London is a big place. Even if you live and work in central, doesn't mean you can walk to work. And some people just can't stand being squashed on a tube/bus every day.
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    (Original post by No Future)
    London is a big place. Even if you live and work in central, doesn't mean you can walk to work. And some people just can't stand being squashed on a tube/bus every day.
    No, but if you live and work central, you can definitely cycle to work. I could cross the whole of central LDN in 30 mins on my bike. I often travel from Wembley Park to Islington in under 40 minutes. So that means you could live in zone 4 and commute into zone 1 in three quarters of an hour. And Archway to the Strand could be done in 15 minutes.

    EDIT: Actually, i think I could get across Zone 1 diagonally-Old Street to Gloucester Road-in 20 minutes breaking reds.

    So I really don't think anyone is out of reasonable commuting range on a bicycle unless they live past zone 5. And then, you could manage to take the train.
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    (Original post by Fission_Mailed)
    Hopefully it will. Otherwise my grandkids are going to have to find a way to balance a double wardrobe between two bikes.


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    OK, I'll admit it; I didn't read the OP properly.
    When you look at the scientific progress we've made in the last 40 years it would be pretty foolish to assume that we've reached some sort of technological peak.
    Just 40 years ago computers were the size of rooms and had far less power than a top of the range phone today.
    We were just starting to build computers back then, now we're attempting to build quantum computers which would be unimaginably more powerful than anything we've ever built before.
    40 years ago nobody could fit 40,000 songs into their pocket.
    40 years ago nobody could have a conversation with someone on the other side of the world using a device in their pocket, or use the same device to access the entirety of human knowledge through the internet.
    40 years ago, viewing galaxies 14 billion light years away using a telescope in orbit around the earth was the stuff of the wildest dreams of scientists.

    If we can do that in the last 40 years, imagine what we can do in the next 40! I'm very confident that unless some terrible tragedy befalls mankind I really think we'll be seeing quantum computers, nuclear fusion on an industrial scale, electric cars and people frequently living over 100-110 (that's not necessarily a good thing though)
    It will be wonder to see!
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    (Original post by bj_945)
    No, but if you live and work central, you can definitely cycle to work. I could cross the whole of central LDN in 30 mins on my bike.
    If cycling lanes were better. At the moment, it looks terrifying trying to cycle
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    (Original post by No Future)
    If cycling lanes were better. At the moment, it looks terrifying trying to cycle
    I personally don't find it scary, though I've had two or three moments. I've cycled for a year, and had one collision with a woman who crossed Oxford Street without looking. But, really, it's not too bad.

    The danger is extremely exaggerated-around 15 people a year die on bicycles in LDN, which is a miniscule proportion of the 2500 a year who die in road-related incidents in Britain.

    Half of those deaths happen in the same way every year: people undertake lorries in the approach to junctions, which then turn left, running over by the cyclist with the trailer.

    So, basically, as a cyclist in LDN you are quite safe, and doubly so if you make sure you never undertake a lorry before a junction. Statistically it is more dangerous to be a pedestrian.

    If cars (and especially articulated lorries) were reduced in number In LDN, it would become safer still.
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    UK rejects EU call for city centre ban on petrol cars
    The UK has rejected proposals from the EU which call for a ban on petrol and diesel cars from city centres by 2050.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-12879566
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    Typical backwards thinking so commonly seen in local government. First lets ban cars (or make life as difficult and expensive for them as possible), then lets think about improving alternative means of transport. In the mean time, the local economy will collapse.
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    We're talking about 2050, who knows what we'll be bloody doing then.

    One problem I have is with environmentalism and overly cautious risk-management being used as excuses to reduce our standard of living. If trains and so forth are attractive enough, I may use them - at the moment, I tend to avoid them; if I want to drive my own car to work then I shouldn't be unnecessarily penalised for that. By all means, throw some research into how to make things more environmentally friendly, but don't expect civilisation to move backwards in order to accommodate it.

    Private car ownership is, quite rightly, important to people. They want it, and government at all levels should not be putting obstacles in their way. Equally, it seems we're constantly moving backwards: huddled into overcrowded trains, to work at 'open plan' workspaces for horrendously long hours, before returning to **** jerry-built houses in vulgar sprawling estates. Is that what the British middle class is to be condemned to?

    (Original post by py0alb)
    Typical backwards so commonly thinking seen in local government. First lets ban cars (or make life as difficult and expensive for them as possible), then lets think about improving alternative means of transport. In the mean time, the local economy will collapse.
    I don't often find myself agreeing with you, but in this case certainly - at least in the wider sense rather than relating to this specific example.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    I don't often find myself agreeing with you, but in this case certainly - at least in the wider sense rather than relating to this specific example.

    If I agreed with you more often, then we'd both be wrong.
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    It looks like the government threw it out. The aim of it makes sense, but public transport is poor, and getting even more expensive. To ban cars would make things a whole lot worse - the people who need cars would be screwed, and those who use one as a luxury would be pushed onto public transport, making the wquality even worse.
 
 
 
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