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What benefit have you personally gained for Voting Conservative/Liberal? watch

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    I am honestly pissed off with all these Lid Dem and Tory voters protesting against cuts when they are the ones that caused it!

    I really didn't get why people voted for these two parties over Labour but putting that aside what have you Tory/Liberal voters actually gained?
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    (Original post by gonzalez7)
    I am honestly pissed off with all these Lid Dem and Tory voters protesting against cuts when they are the ones that caused it!

    I really didn't get why people voted for these two parties over Labour but putting that aside what have you Tory/Liberal voters actually gained?
    You sure about that? More or less everyone down at the protests were either a Labourite/Communist/Socialist (using the loose sense of these words).
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    Most of the people on here haven't had a chance yet. So you'll only get a small minority answering your question, I'm afraid.

    In addition, there's a very thick line dividing the Conservative and Labour voters on here; not so much between that mainstream pair and the Liberal Democrats though, I've noticed. In any case, you'll get a lot of bias between the two.

    I would have voted Liberal Democrats had I been 18 at the time; but that was purely because I thought they were going to scrap/reduce Tuition Fees, and this was at the time where I was thinking of Uni, and not a career in DH.

    That would just be my view, however. I was certain the Liberal Democrats would be the dominating party, going by the reputation they'd suddenly developed prior to the Election.
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    I don't think we should blame those who voted Lib Dem.

    No-one had any idea how spineless Nick Clegg and Vince Cable would turn out to be...

    I think most Lib Dems would have voted labour if they could turn back time.
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    alot of people forget, that it was LABOUR who first talked with the Vice Chancellors on raising tuition fees to help pay the debts the UK is in. It was a LABOUR policy that was put in place and the Coalition actually put it through because there isnt much choice. everywhere has to get cuts, thats just the way it is.
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    (Original post by Sim188)
    I don't think we should blame those who voted Lib Dem.

    No-one had any idea how spineless Nick Clegg and Vince Cable would turn out to be...

    I think most Lib Dems would have voted labour if they could turn back time.
    Does anyone else get fed up of this viewpoint? The Lib Dems are a very junior party in a coalition, they haven't ever been near to power before. The fact that they are having any impact on National politics is an accolade.

    But anyway. Of course most of the people that voted Tory knew tough times were ahead. We accepted that and voted on the basis of what we need, not what we would like in an ideal world, which seems to be what Labour always promise. We accept a bit of fiscal responsibility, and didn't vote on the basis of trying to gain a quick buck from the State.
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    (Original post by Jesobel)
    alot of people forget, that it was LABOUR who first talked with the Vice Chancellors on raising tuition fees to help pay the debts the UK is in. It was a LABOUR policy that was put in place and the Coalition actually put it through because there isnt much choice. everywhere has to get cuts, thats just the way it is.
    But which party rallied against these cuts and provided the largest constituent force behind the No Vote?
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    Labour shot themselves when they suggested that in areas where there is a close margin between the tories and libdems that labour voters should vote Lib.
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    (Original post by Steevee)
    Does anyone else get fed up of this viewpoint? The Lib Dems are a very junior party in a coalition, they haven't ever been near to power before. The fact that they are having any impact on National politics is an accolade.

    But anyway. Of course most of the people that voted Tory knew tough times were ahead. We accepted that and voted on the basis of what we need, not what we would like in an ideal world, which seems to be what Labour always promise. We accept a bit of fiscal responsibility, and didn't vote on the basis of trying to gain a quick buck from the State.
    Don't worry, I'm not annoyed with the Conservatives, I'm just annoyed that on his website in black and white Nick Clegg stated that he will vote against any raise in tuition, and that's simply not on from a man who wanted to "restore trust in politics"
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    We gained a government that lives in reality, not a fictional world of money trees growing out of Downing Street.
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    I got a sense of satisfaction that I was ******* the poor :sexface:

    I long for the day when I see David Cameron skip across the street and give all the money to the rich.

    We deserve it, after all :sexface:
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    (Original post by Will Lucky)
    We gained a government that lives in reality, not a fictional world of money trees growing out of Downing Street.
    This.

    What have I gained personally? Nothing, but the country's debt was spiralling out of control and needed to be stopped.
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    I think that it's fair to say that all parties acknowledged the need for cuts and generally reduction in spending. It's the way that each party proposed to go about doing this that differed, as well as the proposals on how to regenerate income.

    As someone who hasn't voted, and doesn't really trust any one party, this is how I see it, and I reckon pretty fair.

    Conservatives: Fairly direct and honest about what they were going to do concerning cuts etc. Lose credibility in that they make out at election time that they stand for everyone in the uk from all classes etc, when really they don't. As soon as they get into government they reestablish that they are the party of the upper and upper-middle classes.


    Labour: Often a bit too idealistic but not in general; look at the numerous successes in development of public services and instituions in the Blair/Brown era. Lost credibility during the election due to a disliked PM, some dodgy decisions during the credit crunch, ( debatable however, as most other governments in the world envy the decisions of Gordon Brown ), and due to competing with fresher faced, more ambitious parties who had the bonus of being able to be hyper critical.

    Lib-Dems: Well... there is nothing to say seeing as they haven't done anything worth noting, aside from betraying their own voters.
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    (Original post by Steevee)
    Does anyone else get fed up of this viewpoint? The Lib Dems are a very junior party in a coalition, they haven't ever been near to power before. The fact that they are having any impact on National politics is an accolade.

    But anyway. Of course most of the people that voted Tory knew tough times were ahead. We accepted that and voted on the basis of what we need, not what we would like in an ideal world, which seems to be what Labour always promise. We accept a bit of fiscal responsibility, and didn't vote on the basis of trying to gain a quick buck from the State.
    Philip Hammond, the transport secretary definitely seems to be accepting his bit of fiscal responsibility, with incredibly convincing mulit-million pound tax avoidance claims always hovering around his head.

    I can't imagine fiscal responsibility is too daunting a prospect for Cameron, Clegg and Osbourne, seeing as the have millionaire parents and have only ever experienced a silver spoon lifestyle.

    As much as sponging off of the state needed to be reduced, it is critical to note that there are a great many people who just aren't in any position to accept fiscal responsibility, and that this number is set to increase considering where the Con-Dem cuts are aimed.

    The money saved by eradicating all unjust benefit claims would be less than 10% of the money saved by eradicating tax avoidance and fraud. Something Cameron has failed to mention to my disappointment.
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    I don't have to look at the grinning, idiotic smirk of Gordon Brown all the time.
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    It's mostly Labour/Far left/UAF/SWP/Communists/Anarchists doing the protesting/rioting.
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    I voted lib dem, I felt that they were the party that addressed my needs.

    An increase on tax threshold and university fees were what i was concerned with. I also felt that Labour no longer were a viable choice as they were not capable of managing the economy. Whilst i was raised in a Tory household, i didnt feel that they addressed my needs.

    I now thoroughly regret voting for lib dems and hope to see their AV referendum crash and burn. I cannot imagine i will be voting for them again in the next general election.
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    (Original post by Jarowi)
    Philip Hammond, the transport secretary definitely seems to be accepting his bit of fiscal responsibility, with incredibly convincing mulit-million pound tax avoidance claims always hovering around his head.

    I can't imagine fiscal responsibility is too daunting a prospect for Cameron, Clegg and Osbourne, seeing as the have millionaire parents and have only ever experienced a silver spoon lifestyle.

    As much as sponging off of the state needed to be reduced, it is critical to note that there are a great many people who just aren't in any position to accept fiscal responsibility, and that this number is set to increase considering where the Con-Dem cuts are aimed.

    The money saved by eradicating all unjust benefit claims would be less than 10% of the money saved by eradicating tax avoidance and fraud. Something Cameron has failed to mention to my disappointment.
    You're right. You know, because someone has money, they are in no position to impose cuts on people. Who cares if they're in charge of the economy or anything? :rolleyes:

    And yes, that may be true. But the people that avoid tax, well they're far better placed to keep avoiding it. Plus, may I just say. Tax avoiders often use few of the services payed for by general tax, so their avoidance is morally higher than those leeches.

    In my opinion anyway.
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    Like I said in my original post I want to know what you have infact gained out of voting Tory/Lib Dem? (NOT YOUR REASONS FOR VOTING FOR THEM)

    i.e. If you wanted to pay larger tuition fees you would have got that? If you wanted libraries to close you got that? etc etc

    I want to know your personal benefits not all this about the deficit something that will affect you personally?
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    The rise in tuition fees will keep the riff raff out of the good unis.

    Watching poor people suffer is always good entertainment and not just on X factor.
 
 
 
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