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AQA English Literature A - Love Through the Ages June 2011 Exam :D watch

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    (Original post by katielou1993)
    I haven't thought about doing this, genius idea. Thanks!
    no problem
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    Can you refer to texts without quotes?
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    (Original post by Sarahtea)
    Can you refer to texts without quotes?
    Truthfully, no. By doing that you'll be making your reference completely descriptive, and most probably just end up relaying the story back to the examiner
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    This is what I thought, I have quotes memorised but my teacher said I didn't have to use them but like you say, it would become descriptive thanks
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    (Original post by Sarahtea)
    Can you refer to texts without quotes?
    Yes. Though you may gain more marks for quotes. It's more about you being able to explain what area of the text you're referring to (Presuming we're talking about Wider Reading) Quotes in Prose and Drama are not as necessary, unless they make a particular and specific language point. The danger with memorising quotes is that you will try and force them in where they may not fully relate to the theme of the question. If in doubt, stick to making Form/structure comparisons with Wider reading, along with Thematic comparisons. If you have quotes to support whatever point you are making then that helps, if not it's not a major issue. Due to the fact that they are much shorter, I'd try and learn a few poetry quotes however.

    If we're talking about just the unseen extracts, then quote all the time.
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    (Original post by Pthaos)
    Yes. Though you may gain more marks for quotes. It's more about you being able to explain what area of the text you're referring to (Presuming we're talking about Wider Reading) Quotes in Prose and Drama are not as necessary, unless they make a particular and specific language point. The danger with memorising quotes is that you will try and force them in where they may not fully relate to the theme of the question. If in doubt, stick to making Form/structure comparisons with Wider reading, along with Thematic comparisons. If you have quotes to support whatever point you are making then that helps, if not it's not a major issue. Due to the fact that they are much shorter, I'd try and learn a few poetry quotes however.

    If we're talking about just the unseen extracts, then quote all the time.
    I was talking about wider reading, so thanks One more question though, will it looked bad if say, Q1 is Drama, and they use a Shakespeare play, and I only refer to shakespeare plays in my wider reading? I do have others but I know Romeo and Juliet and Othello really well.
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    (Original post by Sarahtea)
    I was talking about wider reading, so thanks One more question though, will it looked bad if say, Q1 is Drama, and they use a Shakespeare play, and I only refer to shakespeare plays in my wider reading? I do have others but I know Romeo and Juliet and Othello really well.
    I'm not too sure. I think it may look a little narrow, but if you can find enough similarities/differences to talk about differences in style within the same author, you should have no trouble with it
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    i have another question... will you gain credit for wider reading when it is like this...


    "what neither of the extracts incorporate to convey the message of ___________ is the technique of ________. playwright _______ uses ___________ to present a similar notion of _______ "quotation".


    so like.... as an example i just made up...

    "what neither of the extracts incorporate to convey the notion of the loss of love is the technique of symbolism. playwright henrik ibsen uses symbolism in his drama text "a doll's house" through the use of a christmas tree; the dying tree "stripped of all ornament" symbolises the relationship between nora and torvald ETCETC."


    or are you not supposed to comment on what the extract DOESN'T USE, only on what it DOES.
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    (Original post by ashleighwhitehouse)
    i have another question... will you gain credit for wider reading when it is like this...


    "what neither of the extracts incorporate to convey the message of ___________ is the technique of ________. playwright _______ uses ___________ to present a similar notion of _______ "quotation".


    so like.... as an example i just made up...

    "what neither of the extracts incorporate to convey the notion of the loss of love is the technique of symbolism. playwright henrik ibsen uses symbolism in his drama text "a doll's house" through the use of a christmas tree; the dying tree "stripped of all ornament" symbolises the relationship between nora and torvald ETCETC."


    or are you not supposed to comment on what the extract DOESN'T USE, only on what it DOES.


    Probably better to put it like "whereas ____ playwright uses ___ technique to convey the theme of ____, Ibsen (or whoever) uses symbolism to convey it" Start with similarities, not differences, then it's a more obvious comparison, would be my advice...
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    (Original post by GeeWaddles)
    Probably better to put it like "whereas ____ playwright uses ___ technique to convey the theme of ____, Ibsen (or whoever) uses symbolism to convey it" Start with similarities, not differences, then it's a more obvious comparison, would be my advice...



    ok thankyou, that makes more sense haha.
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    Re-reading that last post, it makes no sense at all - my bad

    What I mean is start with the similarity; in this case, the theme. Then say the different ways it's communicated, i.e. through symbolism.
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    (Original post by GeeWaddles)
    Re-reading that last post, it makes no sense at all - my bad

    What I mean is start with the similarity; in this case, the theme. Then say the different ways it's communicated, i.e. through symbolism.

    trust me it did make sense!
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    (Original post by ashleighwhitehouse)
    trust me it did make sense!
    Awesome; always nice to find out you can speak coherently on the eve of an English exam!
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    [QUOTE=Pthaos;32186093


    Your advice has been invaluable as well - thank you for all your contributions as someone who teaches the subject! It's appreciated that you can offer advice to us even though you're not in a position where it's necessary to do so. [/QUOTE]

    It's a pleasure. Good luck to you all!
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    (Original post by ashleighwhitehouse)
    also does narrative voice come under form or structure?
    Form (:
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    Is comparing the themes of the literature not marked as highly as, say, comparing language or structure? I know the whole answer shouldn't be focussed on just comparing theme, but is it preferable to talk about language/structure over theme (if that makes sense)?
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    (Original post by ~Elle~)
    Form (:
    I'm pasting in my earlier answer here:

    It could be either (dramatic monologue = form, multiple narrators in e.g. Wuthering Heights = structure), but it really doesn't matter because there's no reason to label it. Talk about it when it's relevant. People are stressing too much! As I've said elsewhere or earlier (I'm losing track of where I'm posting at the moment), the best essays are where the student has seen something really interesting and pursues an individual line of enquiry without sticking rigidly to a pre-prepared essay formula. Freshness of approach is a signifier of A and A* answers and you can weigh yourself down with too much reliance on labelling things for no real purpose.
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    (Original post by cdvdtz)
    Is comparing the themes of the literature not marked as highly as, say, comparing language or structure? I know the whole answer shouldn't be focussed on just comparing theme, but is it preferable to talk about language/structure over theme (if that makes sense)?
    What I normally do is mention it in the intro, because generally, the two extracts will be similar in theme but there will be a fundamental difference between them.

    I used to write a paragraph on the key themes after the intro, however that is too time-consuming for me, I struggle to be able to write a conclusion!!!!

    I also use the theme to help me when I'm analysing form structure and lang. (:
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    (Original post by ~Elle~)
    What I normally do is mention it in the intro, because generally, the two extracts will be similar in theme but there will be a fundamental difference between them.

    I used to write a paragraph on the key themes after the intro, however that is too time-consuming for me, I struggle to be able to write a conclusion!!!!

    I also use the theme to help me when I'm analysing form structure and lang. (:
    Thanks! So is it best to talk more about language/structure/form and then bring in how these things present the theme differently from one extract to another?
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    In Forster's 'A Room with a View' he uses a lot of water imagery, but only uses the word 'water' once as a verb. Would this be 'Forster creates a lexis of water...' or 'Forster's water lexis'? x
 
 
 
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