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AQA English Literature A - Love Through the Ages June 2011 Exam :D Watch

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    I completely fluked my war through AS English lit last year getting 115/120 in the exam, without doing any worthy revision..
    I'm hoping that this unlikely gamble pays off once more =/
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    (Original post by Colour Me Pretty)
    I didn't realise how little context is worth.
    AO4 is wider reading AND context, so essentially they're worth about five marks each which has stopped me stressing so much!

    I've been REALLY worried about this exam. However, my teacher gave me a model answer which has been invaluable. I've been doing past papers and it's helped me structure more coherent responses.
    Yep! I think this is a mistake quite a few people make. The amount of people in my class that reel off a massive list of wider reading is ridiculous. This paper all comes down to being able to analyse a piece of literature and then being able to formulate a coherent essay in reply to the answer. As long as you choose wisely with your wider reading and can analyse things relatively well, you should be fine. That's when it comes down to the 'luck of the extracts'.
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    (Original post by JoeK)
    Yep! I think this is a mistake quite a few people make. The amount of people in my class that reel off a massive list of wider reading is ridiculous. This paper all comes down to being able to analyse a piece of literature and then being able to formulate a coherent essay in reply to the answer. As long as you choose wisely with your wider reading and can analyse things relatively well, you should be fine. That's when it comes down to the 'luck of the extracts'.
    Wish I was in a class like that. I'm in a class of 7 where I think I'm the only one who bothered to actually read the assigned books. It's a joke. At least my tutor is good, and I get a lot of personalised help where needed :P
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    Hi everyone. New to this posting threads business so hope this works lol, but really need some help!

    was just wondering if anyone had a BREIF over view of the main periods / centurys / eras of liturature for context that they could paste onto here?
    have missed a lot of school due to illness and have always been awful at history - i know nothing about context for this exam!
    i also don't get what exactly we are supposed to comment on context wise, eg is it how the audience of that time would react to it compared to todays audience, or what was going on at that time to make them write in certain ways, or what was going on to do with views on love, or what?!

    i know its not a big part of the marks which is a relief, but i would like to be able to read the date commentary thingy at the top of the unseen extracts we get, and be able to say 'right that was this era so i can comment on this' just to make sure i cover it..
    also when making my wider reading notes on form structure language themes etc context is blank, i dont know what to write about or where to find help. all the stuff i've found on the net is just TOO much info and i can't teach myself all this history in a few days!

    I WOULD BE SOOO GRATEFULL FOR ANYONE TO REPLY AND GIVE ME SOME HELP..
    Please
    thankyou xxx
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    (Original post by Colour Me Pretty)
    I didn't realise how little context is worth.
    AO4 is wider reading AND context, so essentially they're worth about five marks each which has stopped me stressing so much!

    I've been REALLY worried about this exam. However, my teacher gave me a model answer which has been invaluable. I've been doing past papers and it's helped me structure more coherent responses.
    On AQA's website it says somewhere that there are the same amounts of marks awarded for each AO: 15 for 1, 2, 3 and 4. I think 3 is comparisons and other interpretations and 4 is context, I'd check though xx
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    (Original post by Rachel_Leah)
    On AQA's website it says somewhere that there are the same amounts of marks awarded for each AO: 15 for 1, 2, 3 and 4. I think 3 is comparisons and other interpretations and 4 is context, I'd check though xx
    Yeaaah.
    A03 is the actual comparison and alternative interpretations.
    A04 counts for both wider reading and context, which means we don't have to go crazy on either of them.
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    (Original post by JoeK)
    Yep! I think this is a mistake quite a few people make. The amount of people in my class that reel off a massive list of wider reading is ridiculous. This paper all comes down to being able to analyse a piece of literature and then being able to formulate a coherent essay in reply to the answer. As long as you choose wisely with your wider reading and can analyse things relatively well, you should be fine. That's when it comes down to the 'luck of the extracts'.
    Yeah, I was really worried about if, but I know my texts really well. I'd rather that than tonnes of texts I don't know that well.
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    I am not convinced you need to study around 5 texts from each category. I believe it is far better learning 2 or 3 (well). This means you will have a much more focused and relevant portfolio of wider texts to support your answers where needed.

    However I am finding it difficult in obtaining a strong poetry bank. With AQA not giving a clear indication to what specifically needs to be learnt, it all becomes quite vague. Therefore during my revision times I am not filled with confidence that the prose, poetry and drama's that I have studied are definitely going to have a part to play in my exam.

    Having said that, not much can now be done to change this. Which means I am going to need 3 or 4 poems that provide a wide range of angles to approach the essence of love. Can anyone suggest a number of poems which seem most popular when relating too; themes, motives, representations and ultimately the various forms of love? Your feedback would be much appreciated it!

    Good Luck to everyone doing the exam.... were gonna need it!
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    (Original post by JustinBobby)

    Having said that, not much can now be done to change this. Which means I am going to need 3 or 4 poems that provide a wide range of angles to approach the essence of love. Can anyone suggest a number of poems which seem most popular when relating too; themes, motives, representations and ultimately the various forms of love? Your feedback would be much appreciated it!
    Personally, I have looked at Duffy's "The World's Wife" - It was the text used in my coursework piece and the anthology as a whole provides a whole host of themes relating to 'different' love, such as Homosexual love, obsessive love, selfish love, love gone wrong, twisted love, etc. Unfortunately it has very few examples of 'normal' love such as romantic/passionate love between a man and a woman. I'd recommend going through things you've done in class, in the hopes that a few poems will stick out in your memory. It'd be better to look at some you already know reasonably well that sort-of-relate to the theme, rather than trying to learn something new and good from scratch.
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    Hi guys, this might sound really stupid but i'm really struggling to understand Form and Structure..
    With form what would you include? All I can say is that it's a novel, or a play etc.
    What would structure include?
    I got an A last year but this year it's a lot harder!
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    (Original post by cameron9)
    Hi guys, this might sound really stupid but i'm really struggling to understand Form and Structure..
    With form what would you include? All I can say is that it's a novel, or a play etc.
    What would structure include?
    I got an A last year but this year it's a lot harder!
    I'm in the same boat as you to an extent. Honestly, I struggle to define the difference between them, so I don't.

    For Poems, look for the type of poem. Obvious things such as Sonnets or ballads are good to mention. If you can state it's an Sonnet for example, briefly explain what a sonnet is and state why the writer has put it in this form, that's marks gained. Poems also have the advantage of having a whole load of structure-y stuff to talk about like rhythm.

    Prose and Drama does get a little bit more complicated and It's stumping me as well. For these, it might be worth referencing that the text is just an extract, that might allow you to talk about it as an individual piece. As an example, I did a comparison between Dracula and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, for Dracula, I was able to state that it was just an extract. From this you can talk about how the reader may have previous experience with the character, may trust them, etc. One good thing to look out for in novels specifically is tension/atmosphere and whether that is built up throughout to some kind of climactic moment (eg a kiss).

    Sorry if this isn't that helpful. I'm sort of stuck on these as well, so I tend to limit what I say about this in essays. I find there is often a lot more language points to talk about anyway. In whichever question has poetry, you can talk an awful lot about the structure of it anyway.
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    (Original post by Pthaos)
    I'm in the same boat as you to an extent. Honestly, I struggle to define the difference between them, so I don't.

    For Poems, look for the type of poem. Obvious things such as Sonnets or ballads are good to mention. If you can state it's an Sonnet for example, briefly explain what a sonnet is and state why the writer has put it in this form, that's marks gained. Poems also have the advantage of having a whole load of structure-y stuff to talk about like rhythm.

    Prose and Drama does get a little bit more complicated and It's stumping me as well. For these, it might be worth referencing that the text is just an extract, that might allow you to talk about it as an individual piece. As an example, I did a comparison between Dracula and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, for Dracula, I was able to state that it was just an extract. From this you can talk about how the reader may have previous experience with the character, may trust them, etc. One good thing to look out for in novels specifically is tension/atmosphere and whether that is built up throughout to some kind of climactic moment (eg a kiss).

    Sorry if this isn't that helpful. I'm sort of stuck on these as well, so I tend to limit what I say about this in essays. I find there is often a lot more language points to talk about anyway. In whichever question has poetry, you can talk an awful lot about the structure of it anyway.
    yehh no probz mate, you've made it clearer than my bloody english teacher! good luck!
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    For me too, trying to interweave all the different aspects we're asked to address into one continuous and fluent response is the hardest thing! Just wondering, what do people tend to put in their conclusions?
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    I'm starting to get a bit worried now. As a group we haven't actually had any 'set texts',we just got given extract after extract,poem after poem,but we didn't actually go over any novels or plays a class and analyze them =/
    I have obviously read texts in my own time but I don't think I have the kind of knowledge about them which is needed for A2 exams! My teachers have been boasting throughout the whole year about how lucky we are to have so many texts to be able to draw for,but I'm starting to think that perhaps it would have ben better for us to focus on maybe one or two texts for each genre. It's just hit me that I am going to be going into the exam feeling extremely apprehensive.
    Has everyone on here actually been given set texts to read,as well as the odd extract here and there?
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    I was wondering if anybody has some good, full notes on the Handmaid's Tale at all? I love the novel but I don't actually have any notes on it as we didn't study it in class and I found it quite difficult to analyse.

    Also, if anyone wants to swap over any notes on something else that would be great. I don't wanna upload all my notes (as that would take FOREVER aha, so many files and I've spent what feels like a lifetime doing it!) and I don't know if they are what other people would like but if anybody wants to exchange over one of these let me know:

    John Donne poems
    Marvell
    Larkin
    W.B. Yeats
    The passion
    Sense and Sensibility
    A Room with a View
    Atonement
    Streetcar Named Desire
    MacNeice - Les Sylphides
    Jennings - One flesh
    Shakespeare's sonnet 116
    Elizabeth Barret-Browning - Sonnet 43

    I'm braving Chaucer today. Help. Good luck everyone in their revish!
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    (Original post by Pthaos)
    Personally, I have looked at Duffy's "The World's Wife" - It was the text used in my coursework piece and the anthology as a whole provides a whole host of themes relating to 'different' love, such as Homosexual love, obsessive love, selfish love, love gone wrong, twisted love, etc. Unfortunately it has very few examples of 'normal' love such as romantic/passionate love between a man and a woman. I'd recommend going through things you've done in class, in the hopes that a few poems will stick out in your memory. It'd be better to look at some you already know reasonably well that sort-of-relate to the theme, rather than trying to learn something new and good from scratch.
    Thanks for the advice mate, very helpful!
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    Anyone who needs more detailed notes on a specific text, sparknotes is a good website to use. It summarizes important quotes, themes, chapters and characters etc.

    The area that I am struggling in is the poetry section, I have very few poems in my folder as I missed a number of lessons due to illness. Can anyone suggest a good website that will provide detailed explanations of some poems that should come in handy for the exam? Thanks
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    (Original post by Rachel_Leah)
    I was wondering if anybody has some good, full notes on the Handmaid's Tale at all? I love the novel but I don't actually have any notes on it as we didn't study it in class and I found it quite difficult to analyse.

    Also, if anyone wants to swap over any notes on something else that would be great. I don't wanna upload all my notes (as that would take FOREVER aha, so many files and I've spent what feels like a lifetime doing it!) and I don't know if they are what other people would like but if anybody wants to exchange over one of these let me know:

    John Donne poems
    Marvell
    Larkin
    W.B. Yeats
    The passion
    Sense and Sensibility
    A Room with a View
    Atonement
    Streetcar Named Desire
    MacNeice - Les Sylphides
    Jennings - One flesh
    Shakespeare's sonnet 116
    Elizabeth Barret-Browning - Sonnet 43

    I'm braving Chaucer today. Help. Good luck everyone in their revish!
    Hiya, i haven't seen anyone suggesting swapping / helping with notes which i think is a very time consuming good idea..!! so if you would like to swap some i'm in!

    The substancial notes i have are on these texts...

    prose:
    Wuthering Heights

    poetry:
    Porphyria's Lover - Robert Browning
    How do i love thee - Elizabeth Browning
    To his Coy Mistress - Andrew Marvell

    drama:
    A Doll's House - Henrik Ibson
    Othello - Shakespeare

    & Out of yours i would really appreiciate these:

    John Donne poems
    Atonement
    Streetcar Named Desire
    Shakespeare's sonnet 116


    I've only really started using this so i don't know how we would send files. so get back to me when you read this!

    and sorry if the context part of it is poor i have been struggling with that part.. sorry i don't have notes on the handmaid's tail, i also am meaning to make notes on that one as did it for c/w last year but it's like a distant memory!

    also if anyone saw my post a few posts up about CONTEXT HELP please help!!! no-one has replied i will send my notes to anyone who needs them lol. if anyone else wants to swap with the notes i mentioned above i'm also in need of: my last sonne - ben jonson

    just let me know how it works :P

    thank you, and someone anyyyyone pleasee reply to my context post !
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    (Original post by JaiiStarh)
    I'm starting to get a bit worried now. As a group we haven't actually had any 'set texts',we just got given extract after extract,poem after poem,but we didn't actually go over any novels or plays a class and analyze them =/
    I have obviously read texts in my own time but I don't think I have the kind of knowledge about them which is needed for A2 exams! My teachers have been boasting throughout the whole year about how lucky we are to have so many texts to be able to draw for,but I'm starting to think that perhaps it would have ben better for us to focus on maybe one or two texts for each genre. It's just hit me that I am going to be going into the exam feeling extremely apprehensive.
    Has everyone on here actually been given set texts to read,as well as the odd extract here and there?
    We didn't have set texts either, our course has been all over the place & teachers have only recently started to get organised. But for your 'set texts' you could just use the ones you studied for coursework. We studied Wuthering Heights, Othello & Browning's monologues which is one from each genre so i knew those texts pretty well and was able to make notes using things i'd talked about in my coursework. Then just pick some of the hundreds of extracts you have and learn them, you're probably better off than most people well me anyways and don't need to worry so much like people have said earlier you don't need to remember SO much wider reading but you'll have a big choice which is good.

    good luck!!
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    I need to throw out a small request for help - I'm trying to organise my wider reading into themes (I know, I've said a lot that wider reading isn't as important as analysing the texts, but I'd still like some organisation.) So far, I've come up with the following themes/ideas

    -Romantic love
    -Passion/lust
    -Forbidden love
    -Unrequited love
    -Selfish/Self love
    -Loss of a loved one

    I'm having trouble defining things into clear themes. If anyone has any suggestions for further "themes", please add to the list, as well as editing/combining/deleting if you feel any of these I have so far don't really work.

    EDIT - I was thinking of doing a revision session at sometime during the day on Wednesday, the day before the exam. Would anyone be interested in joining me to chat about the exam/how we're preparing for it whilst revising purely English stuff? We can either get it going here or I was thinking of creating a new thread for a revision drop-in thing at a specific time (We can organise when people are available/want to revise) We can chat while we work, compare/swap notes, etc. Would anyone be interested in this?
 
 
 
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