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AQA English Literature A - Love Through the Ages June 2011 Exam :D watch

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    (Original post by Pthaos)
    I seem to have reasonable response to the idea of doing a revision session on Wednesday, so I'll get a thread going in advance for people to talk in while we work.

    What times are convenient for people? I'll probably aim to start at about 9AM and work through till mid afternoon, but in reality, It'd probably be about a 10AM start for me.
    Any time is good for me to be honest. I'll be looking at notes on and off throughout the day. I guess I can get up earlier too!

    (Original post by lucyalexandra)
    I'm really struggling with how to structure my answers...especially as in an exam, when I panic, I tend to waffle on for ages about something, completely lose any kind of structure and end up losing marks because it basically all falls to pieces, haha. In terms of AO's, how do you guys structure yours?
    If you can come up with a generic plan to follow now it should help you. An easy way to start is to talk about the general themes that are in the extracts. Then follow this on discussing language techniques used, comparing and contrasting them and dropping in some wider reading. If you can put some information in there regarding context it would help too, particularly if you can seamlessly link it with a quote from the extract. Otherwise you can just do a small section on it at the start or the end. I find it easier to then separate different bits into shorter paragraphs too as I find it easier to follow my points that way, but whatever suits you and what you're talking about should be fine.

    When you're analysing the extracts try to separate points into different topics of paragraphs and how you can link them with each other, either through contrasts or similarities. If there's a particular point that you think relates to your wider reading make sure that you note that down next to it as well. I've forgotten to talk about some wider reading before because I forget to write it down next to particular points.

    Otherwise though just make sure that you get a decent amount of language analysis in, along with some wider reading and contextual information. As long as you hit the AO's somewhere and have a coherent essay you should be fine. If you're in the middle of writing a point and think of something, just quickly note it down on your plan and then you can always come back to it.
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    (Original post by yasmin-alica)
    We didn't have set texts either, our course has been all over the place & teachers have only recently started to get organised. But for your 'set texts' you could just use the ones you studied for coursework. We studied Wuthering Heights, Othello & Browning's monologues which is one from each genre so i knew those texts pretty well and was able to make notes using things i'd talked about in my coursework. Then just pick some of the hundreds of extracts you have and learn them, you're probably better off than most people well me anyways and don't need to worry so much like people have said earlier you don't need to remember SO much wider reading but you'll have a big choice which is good.

    good luck!!

    I actually thought we were doing alright until I came on TSR lol,then I realised I don't really have any indepth knowledge about any texts,except perhaps the ones I did for my coursework (Othello,The Yellow Wallpaper and Educating Rita)
    I think I am going to have to just rely on the internet to help me analyse a couple of texts in depth because my teachers are stuck on the idea that quantity is better than quality :confused:
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    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...3#post32146163

    Revision Thread is up if people are willing to wake up at normal time despite study leave and get some work done on Wednesday
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    Does anyone actually structure their essay like: intro (themes) - structure - form - language - either s/f/l again - conclude? I mean, does the mark scheme require analysis of all three in both essays? It's sometimes hard to compare the form of a drama with, for example, a poem.
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    I have a definite feeling that Drama will come up for the Part A question.

    Also, if anybody has any specific questions then feel free to PM me . I got 200/200 last year and I am currently on 80/80 A2 coursework.
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    (Original post by Cast.Iron)
    I have a definite feeling that Drama will come up for the Part A question.

    Also, if anybody has any specific questions then feel free to PM me . I got 200/200 last year and I am currently on 80/80 A2 coursework.
    :eek: Are you being serious?! That's incredible- what's your secret!

    On a serious note... do you have any pointers for getting an A in the essays?
    I achieved B's in my January exams, but am studying AS and A2 in a year, so haven't really had the chance of building on the AS foundation... any pointers would be gratefully appreciated!
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    (Original post by malaikah)
    :eek: Are you being serious?! That's incredible- what's your secret!

    On a serious note... do you have any pointers for getting an A in the essays?
    I achieved B's in my January exams, but am studying AS and A2 in a year, so haven't really had the chance of building on the AS foundation... any pointers would be gratefully appreciated!
    Yeah I'm serious .

    I don't buy into all of this AO business, I just think abstractly and write my thoughts.

    My advice to you, as said by many in this thread, would be to practice timed essays. Do not get stressed about wider reading, really one decent text from each genre should be enough (although I appreciate that two or three can be beneficial). Remember that 70% of the marks come from the unseen text so that is what you need to concentrate on. Be sure to integrate any wider reading into your normal paragraphs as opposed to simply 'bolting it on' at the end. The exam provides you with ample planning time (half an hour for each question) so make sure that you absorb the text.

    Prep-wise, I would learn a few select and universal quotes and I would make contextual links between your wider reading as well as making links between similar themes of love.

    The key, I find, to Lit is not to treat it so methodically (although I appreciate that this doesn't work for everyone). The subject allows you to be exuberant in your prose. Look at the text from different perspectives and squeeze every possible meaning out of any poignant sentences.

    Sorry if this is rather vague, but I do not know how to advise you really! This exam is definitely hard but it is also quite rich so there will always be plenty to write about.

    I also have a feeling that it will be drama for the Part A this year and I have a feeling that they will put some Shakespeare in. Might be an idea to read some Chaucer too because if you can understand that then you are sorted as they will not give you anything earlier.

    Oh yes and it sounds stupid but treat drama as drama!
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    (Original post by Cast.Iron)
    Yeah I'm serious .

    I don't buy into all of this AO business, I just think abstractly and write my thoughts.

    My advice to you, as said by many in this thread, would be to practice timed essays. Do not get stressed about wider reading, really one decent text from each genre should be enough (although I appreciate that two or three can be beneficial). Remember that 70% of the marks come from the unseen text so that is what you need to concentrate on. Be sure to integrate any wider reading into your normal paragraphs as opposed to simply 'bolting it on' at the end. The exam provides you with ample planning time (half an hour for each question) so make sure that you absorb the text.

    Prep-wise, I would learn a few select and universal quotes and I would make contextual links between your wider reading as well as making links between similar themes of love.

    The key, I find, to Lit is not to treat it so methodically (although I appreciate that this doesn't work for everyone). The subject allows you to be exuberant in your prose. Look at the text from different perspectives and squeeze every possible meaning out of any poignant sentences.

    Sorry if this is rather vague, but I do not know how to advise you really! This exam is definitely hard but it is also quite rich so there will always be plenty to write about.

    I also have a feeling that it will be drama for the Part A this year and I have a feeling that they will put some Shakespeare in. Might be an idea to read some Chaucer too because if you can understand that then you are sorted as they will not give you anything earlier.

    Oh yes and it sounds stupid but treat drama as drama!
    All very good advice. There won't be any Chaucer on the paper. It says so in the spec.
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    All very good advice. There won't be any Chaucer on the paper. It says so in the spec.
    Good point. However, if you're familiar with such early writing then it will still work to your benefit if given something from the Medieval Gothic period.
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    Yes, I'm sure it would, but I highly doubt they would do that. There would be a considerable outcry of unfairness from teachers. If Chaucer, as the best known poet of the era, is judged to be too difficult to spring onto candidates unseen, they will not be bunging Piers Plowman or Medieval English Lyrics on.
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    (Original post by Cast.Iron)
    Yeah I'm serious .

    I don't buy into all of this AO business, I just think abstractly and write my thoughts.

    My advice to you, as said by many in this thread, would be to practice timed essays. Do not get stressed about wider reading, really one decent text from each genre should be enough (although I appreciate that two or three can be beneficial). Remember that 70% of the marks come from the unseen text so that is what you need to concentrate on. Be sure to integrate any wider reading into your normal paragraphs as opposed to simply 'bolting it on' at the end. The exam provides you with ample planning time (half an hour for each question) so make sure that you absorb the text.

    Prep-wise, I would learn a few select and universal quotes and I would make contextual links between your wider reading as well as making links between similar themes of love.

    The key, I find, to Lit is not to treat it so methodically (although I appreciate that this doesn't work for everyone). The subject allows you to be exuberant in your prose. Look at the text from different perspectives and squeeze every possible meaning out of any poignant sentences.

    Sorry if this is rather vague, but I do not know how to advise you really! This exam is definitely hard but it is also quite rich so there will always be plenty to write about.

    I also have a feeling that it will be drama for the Part A this year and I have a feeling that they will put some Shakespeare in. Might be an idea to read some Chaucer too because if you can understand that then you are sorted as they will not give you anything earlier.

    Oh yes and it sounds stupid but treat drama as drama!
    That's really, really helpful- thankyou so much! I'd wish you luck, but considering those marks, I'm sure you'll ace the exam anyway
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    Ahh I've done my poetry wider reading revision for the day
    For my essay structure, I usually do the following - say what each of the poems is ABOUT. My teachers keep drilling in that you can't analyse how the techniques compliment the writers ideas/tone etc if you can't actually sum up what the extract says.
    Then I compare form and structure in a paragraph or two, and if I have wider reading with similar or different forms/structures bring that in if relevant.
    Then the bulk of the essay is on language analysis, where I usually bring in 1/2 wider reading references if I haven't in the form and structure.
    If I have time, I try and save a really good language point for the end, which sums up what each of the poems is about!
    Context manages to weave itself in somehow haha, either if its a typical form of the time (i.e. Tis Pity She's a Whore is a sensationalist Jacobean tragedy, which became popular with audiences who enjoyed seeing gory battles on stage etc...) or language (Metaphysical poets often employed conceits or extended metaphors as a form of logical argument, complimented by the use sophistry which reflected the influence of philosophy and logic in the 17th-century at explaining the world...), I find structure quite difficult :/ But I guess things such as sentence structure and the way words are placed would count?

    It works for me I guess
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    Yes, I'm sure it would, but I highly doubt they would do that. There would be a considerable outcry of unfairness from teachers. If Chaucer, as the best known poet of the era, is judged to be too difficult to spring onto candidates unseen, they will not be bunging Piers Plowman or Medieval English Lyrics on.
    Just because he was the most renowned poet of the era does not necessarily make him the most difficult to analyse. For example, Shakespeare was the most renowned poet of his era but Marlowe is widely considered to be more accessible.

    However, I take your point.

    (Original post by malaikah)
    That's really, really helpful- thankyou so much! I'd wish you luck, but considering those marks, I'm sure you'll ace the exam anyway
    No worries. Don't say that, this is the exam which I am hoping for my A* in !
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    (Original post by Cast.Iron)
    Just because he was the most renowned poet of the era does not necessarily make him the most difficult to analyse. For example, Shakespeare was the most renowned poet of his era but Marlowe is widely considered to be more accessible.

    However, I take your point.

    !
    No, it doesn't make him the most difficult to analyse. He is one of the easier ones, which is my point. If they have said they won't put Chaucer on, they will not put on anyone harder, which pretty well covers everyone else from that period of literature. You are, after all, only A level students. Marlowe is considerably more accessible than Shakespeare and has been a set author over many years and many syllabuses (I have been teaching him at various times for 23 years and he certainly predates my A level teaching career as a set author by a long way), so he is certainly fair game and could easily come up.
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    is anyone else slightly freaking for this exam or is that just me?
    I'm absolutely bricking it. So scared.
    I feel like whenever i look at extracts i can't seem to find anything to analyse, let alone write a 40-mark essay about.
    oh my.
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    (Original post by lolly21)
    is anyone else slightly freaking for this exam or is that just me?
    I'm absolutely bricking it. So scared.
    I feel like whenever i look at extracts i can't seem to find anything to analyse, let alone write a 40-mark essay about.
    oh my.
    Read the thread, 95% of us are bricking it

    I think we just need to accept that this exam is heavily dependant upon what we get on the day. It's luck of the draw. There's only so much preparation we can do as students, so try not to worry too much. (I'm saying that, but I'm just as worried!)
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    (Original post by Pthaos)
    Read the thread, 95% of us are bricking it

    I think we just need to accept that this exam is heavily dependant upon what we get on the day. It's luck of the draw. There's only so much preparation we can do as students, so try not to worry too much. (I'm saying that, but I'm just as worried!)
    okay, well that does certainly cheer me up a bit (: thanks for the words of encouragement!
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    i am also bricking it ! you are deffo not alone lol
    D:

    I know a couple of you helped earlier but im still struggling with context..
    There is something wrong with my brain where it rejects all historical info especially when there is too much...!!

    Would anyone please be able to give me BRIEF details on the literary periods and any general stuff we should know about it.. I've been trying to do it all day and just switch off cos there's always too much info..

    I think i have narrowed it down correctly to these being the eras:

    Medieval
    Elizebethan & Jacobean
    Augustan (?! lol)
    Romantic
    Victorian & Edwardian
    Modernist
    Post Modernist

    Feel free to correct me if i'm wrong ??

    All i really need is to know what periods there are (if my list was wrong), Know when the periods were eg 1600-1700 and the century or w/e.. and just a brief couple sentences about what was going on that would be relevant to this exam??

    For example.. Victorian age... strict social codes, men were the earners women were the housewives .. 'a dolls house' goes against this which is why the audience of that time would be shocked! (the only point i can really make on context - v basic at that :P)

    just breif stuff i can memorise and mention in exam in relevance to the unseen extracts (i'm not aiming for an A so this is all i think i need considering how little context is worth)
    would realllly appreiciate it if someone could respond, im sure a lot of you clever clog english genius's know all this off the top of your heads and could write in in a 'context for dummies' form pleeeeassee . english is driving me crazy :P can't wait till exam is over! xxx
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    No, it doesn't make him the most difficult to analyse. He is one of the easier ones, which is my point. If they have said they won't put Chaucer on, they will not put on anyone harder, which pretty well covers everyone else from that period of literature. You are, after all, only A level students. Marlowe is considerably more accessible than Shakespeare and has been a set author over many years and many syllabuses (I have been teaching him at various times for 23 years and he certainly predates my A level teaching career as a set author by a long way), so he is certainly fair game and could easily come up.
    Oh I see what you mean.

    I was never contesting that Marlowe wouldn't come up in the exam.

    My original premise was that were one to acquaint oneself with some Chaucer then they would be less likely to be phased by older texts, which is common amongst a lot of candidates and I am sure that you would agree.

    Also, this exam is notorious for throwing curve-balls and as a result AQA has been complained to on more than one occasion, so although they wouldn't put Chaucer as an unseen text as you said, they might put in an extract which isn't that long after Chaucer. I only suggested it as a precaution.
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    Hi guys
    my structure for the essays tends to follow what people have been putting on here (i.e. intro-theme-form/structure-lang-wider reading lang-wider reading f/s-conclusion) But i was just wondering f you could give me some advice.
    for my form/structure section, my teacher keeps saying i lose marks as i am not including quotes for my form/structure points. How are you guys tackling this? i find it hard to quote for form and structure without going into language. what evidence do you incuded?
    i also have a strong feeling that Q A willl be on drama. (The Glass Menagerie and Translations are good drama's for people to use with alot of 'challenges to love' in it ) Additionally, i am too focusing on maybe two/three dramas, about 4 poems, and about 3 novels in detail.

    thanks for any help! it is appreciated
 
 
 
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