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AQA English Literature A - Love Through the Ages June 2011 Exam :D watch

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    (Original post by ElizaM)
    not including quotes for my form/structure points.
    Honestly, I don't see how you can be expected to quote form and structure. Form and Structure aren't lines you can quote, they're the make-up of the piece of text. Unless anyone else can decipher this, I'd have to declare that your teacher is talking ****.

    Quoting for language points is very important, perhaps they mean that you need to quote from your wider reading more? But I really can't see how it would even be possible to quote form or structure, that's something you describe such as there being rhythm, or the text being a ballad/bildungsroman/building to a climax etc.



    I too expect the first question to be comparing two Drama extracts. I've heard that Shakespeare sounds promising, but likely not Romeo and Juliet. However I've also heard that AQA likes to throw curveballs, so just because the last two exams were 2x Prose and 2x Poetry doesn't mean that we're 100% certain of getting 2x Drama. I am however, counting on that and revising for that outcome. I figure it will take me 5-10 minutes of planning max to re-order things in my mind if it's wrong.
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    (Original post by Cast.Iron)
    Oh I see what you mean.

    I was never contesting that Marlowe wouldn't come up in the exam.

    My original premise was that were one to acquaint oneself with some Chaucer then they would be less likely to be phased by older texts, which is common amongst a lot of candidates and I am sure that you would agree.

    Also, this exam is notorious for throwing curve-balls and as a result AQA has been complained to on more than one occasion, so although they wouldn't put Chaucer as an unseen text as you said, they might put in an extract which isn't that long after Chaucer. I only suggested it as a precaution.
    I do agree that students are phased by older texts, but you can rest assured that Chaucer won't be one of them and I really don't think they would go back before Marlowe - that really would be too specialist for A level. Anything much earlier than that would be in Middle English and far too difficult to tackle unseen.

    Early days to say the exam is notorious for curved balls, as it's only the third paper this time, but it certainly is challenging. However, as I said earlier in either this thread or the other one one on the topic, if they pitch it wrong, then although you will have an unpleasant two and a half hours in the exam room, the outcome will merely be the adjustment of grade boundaries to maintain the same number of grades as usual. The first paper last June was, indeed, an absolute stinker, but my students got A*s and As out of it when at first glance it seemed impossible that they should do so. It is unfortunately possible that they may go the other way this time and underpitch it, although the January paper didn't suggest that, and if they do, then the grade boundaries will go up. However, the overall outcome will still be that those people at the top of the pile will get their A*s even if they wouldn't have done so on last year's grade boundaries.
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    Yes i also think my teacher is talking bull. What does your teacher think of your essay plan? does she think its succesfull, as its similar to mine.
    Also, does narrative perspective come under form/structure?
    and what form/structure points can you write about in plays? i know there are many but im having a mind blank! would it be like sticchomithia, variation in turn length ext?
    in some respects poetry would be easiest for A in my opinion, as long as it is ok to interpret!!!
    and ye, i think the exam board are definatly prone to chucking in some shakespeare, which isnt too bad in my opinion if youve got a good shakespeare play in your wider reading you can relate comparison and analysing techniques to.

    thanks for your quick reply
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    (Original post by ElizaM)
    Yes i also think my teacher is talking bull. What does your teacher think of your essay plan? does she think its succesfull, as its similar to mine.
    Also, does narrative perspective come under form/structure?
    and what form/structure points can you write about in plays? i know there are many but im having a mind blank! would it be like sticchomithia, variation in turn length ext?
    in some respects poetry would be easiest for A in my opinion, as long as it is ok to interpret!!!
    and ye, i think the exam board are definatly prone to chucking in some shakespeare, which isnt too bad in my opinion if youve got a good shakespeare play in your wider reading you can relate comparison and analysing techniques to.

    thanks for your quick reply
    Honestly, I'm not sure about structure/form points for drama myself. Speaking honestly I have no idea what sticchomithia or variation in turn length are. This is something I need to revise up on myself. I have an extended session with my English teacher tomorrow so will report back if she says anything interesting about form/structure in drama.

    What I'm worried about with drama is if they actually USE my shakespeare wider reading (The Winter's Tale) As an unseen extract! Very small chance of that happening I guess, but if that happens it would make things pretty awkward as I'd have to move onto my other Wider Reading drama, Streetcar named desire. I chose the two as they are almost completely different, so having to compare one to the other could be a pain. Still, small chance of that happening
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    I do agree that students are phased by older texts, but you can rest assured that Chaucer won't be one of them and I really don't think they would go back before Marlowe - that really would be too specialist for A level. Anything much earlier than that would be in Middle English and far too difficult to tackle unseen.

    Early days to say the exam is notorious for curved balls, as it's only the third paper this time, but it certainly is challenging. However, as I said earlier in either this thread or the other one one on the topic, if they pitch it wrong, then although you will have an unpleasant two and a half hours in the exam room, the outcome will merely be the adjustment of grade boundaries to maintain the same number of grades as usual. The first paper last June was, indeed, an absolute stinker, but my students got A*s and As out of it when at first glance it seemed impossible that they should do so. It is unfortunately possible that they may go the other way this time and underpitch it, although the January paper didn't suggest that, and if they do, then the grade boundaries will go up. However, the overall outcome will still be that those people at the top of the pile will get their A*s even if they wouldn't have done so on last year's grade boundaries.
    That's true. You obviously know more about this exam than I do so I'll take your word for it.

    If I recall correctly, there was some furore over a text of an English translated French text? I can see how that would throw some people, however I think it'd also be quite an interesting text to compare as well as the wealth of contextual links which it would have no doubt engendered due to its origins.

    I don't mind whether the grade boundaries go up or down as long as I achieve what I need !
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    I know the plays 'Measure for Measure', 'Tis Pity She's A Whore', and 'A Streetcar Named Desire' really well, and I have some quotes from other extracts. Is there any other drama pieces which people find particularly valuable, which I could swot up on tomorrow? x
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    (Original post by Rachel_Leah)
    I know the plays 'Measure for Measure', 'Tis Pity She's A Whore', and 'A Streetcar Named Desire' really well, and I have some quotes from other extracts. Is there any other drama pieces which people find particularly valuable, which I could swot up on tomorrow? x
    'A Doll's House' by Henrik Ibsen is a good one for marriage/partings. 'The Importance of Being Earnest' by Oscar Wilde is another good text to know.
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    Could anyone please advise me - for my wider reading, I only have the following:

    Prose:

    The Great Gatsby (1925)
    Far From the Madding Crowd (1874)
    Birdsong (1993)

    Drama:

    King Lear
    Hamlet
    A Streetcar Named Desire (1947)
    The Importance of Being Earnest (1895)

    Poetry:

    Sonnet 116 - Let me not to the marriage of true minds
    Sonnet 130 - My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun
    Daddy - Sylvia Plath (1962)
    Warming Her Pearls - Carol Ann Duffy
    Funeral Blues - WH Auden


    Do you think this is enough?
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    (Original post by will_law25)
    Could anyone please advise me - for my wider reading, I only have the following:

    Prose:

    The Great Gatsby (1925)
    Far From the Madding Crowd (1874)
    Birdsong (1993)

    Drama:

    King Lear
    Hamlet
    A Streetcar Named Desire (1947)
    The Importance of Being Earnest (1895)

    Poetry:

    Sonnet 116 - Let me not to the marriage of true minds
    Sonnet 130 - My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun
    Daddy - Sylvia Plath (1962)
    Warming Her Pearls - Carol Ann Duffy
    Funeral Blues - WH Auden


    Do you think this is enough?
    Have you tried any mock papers and, if so, have you been able to make connections? If the answer to that is yes, then you have enough. If the answer to that is no, then you don't. As long as you know each of those texts well and are able to quote from them when relevant, that should be enough
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    I apologize in advance for what probably is a very stupid question and one which has most likely been asked before.. But in terms of making reference to wider reading, must we give quotations for the texts we mention, or can we simply outline the theme/message/technique of that text? I've obviously memorized quotations but for select texts only.

    I'm so rubbish at explaining, but for example, if I were to mention that e. e. Cummings expressed the importance of emotion and physical connection in romantic love in the poem 'since feeling is first', would I be able to just expand on that, or would I have to prove it with a quotation?

    Sorry again for a stupid question. :sigh:
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    (Original post by briesandwich)
    I apologize in advance for what probably is a very stupid question and one which has most likely been asked before.. But in terms of making reference to wider reading, must we give quotations for the texts we mention, or can we simply outline the theme/message/technique of that text? I've obviously memorized quotations but for select texts only.

    I'm so rubbish at explaining, but for example, if I were to mention that e. e. Cummings expressed the importance of emotion and physical connection in romantic love in the poem 'since feeling is first', would I be able to just expand on that, or would I have to prove it with a quotation?

    Sorry again for a stupid question. :sigh:
    Not a stupid question - I was wondering the same thing earlier but I think, as someone else has said, you can't exactly quote for structure/form but you can through language and should quote where possible or appropriate. So you could say, for example, that "cummings expresses how only 'a fool' disregards the physical aspects of love whereas Shakespeare presents the alternative view that love is a 'marriage of true minds' "

    Hope this helps (and correct me if I'm wrong, anyone!)
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    (Original post by Letterbomb31)
    Have you tried any mock papers and, if so, have you been able to make connections? If the answer to that is yes, then you have enough. If the answer to that is no, then you don't. As long as you know each of those texts well and are able to quote from them when relevant, that should be enough
    Thanks, it that case I think I'm ok - just seeing everyone with long lists is slightly offputting but I think the majority of my texts are fairly versatile.
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    (Original post by will_law25)
    Not a stupid question - I was wondering the same thing earlier but I think, as someone else has said, you can't exactly quote for structure/form but you can through language and should quote where possible or appropriate. So you could say, for example, that "cummings expresses how only 'a fool' disregards the physical aspects of love whereas Shakespeare presents the alternative view that love is a 'marriage of true minds' "

    Hope this helps (and correct me if I'm wrong, anyone!)
    Ah thank you. :yep: That's made me feel a lot less silly. +1!
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    (Original post by briesandwich)
    I apologize in advance for what probably is a very stupid question and one which has most likely been asked before.. But in terms of making reference to wider reading, must we give quotations for the texts we mention, or can we simply outline the theme/message/technique of that text? I've obviously memorized quotations but for select texts only.

    I'm so rubbish at explaining, but for example, if I were to mention that e. e. Cummings expressed the importance of emotion and physical connection in romantic love in the poem 'since feeling is first', would I be able to just expand on that, or would I have to prove it with a quotation?

    Sorry again for a stupid question. :sigh:
    As far as I know, quotations aren't required. You can provide evidence for your point through simply knowing the text and referencing ideas within it. (Remember GCSE English? Point - Evidence - Explanation. Still works <3)

    That said, from what I've heard, having quotes for poetry is particularly helpful. With Prose and Drama, you can refer to an "area" of the extract in detail to provide evidence for your point. Evidence that suggests Joe is an unreliable narrator in McEwan's "Enduring Love" can be found throughout the book, including the 'Ice-cream parlour incident'. With a poem, you don't have this liberty as they're usually fairly short and sweet (Especially with Love through the ages where every other bloody poem is a sonnet) so quoting is helpful. Thankfully, it's often a lot easier to remember quotes for poetry.
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    (Original post by Cast.Iron)

    I don't buy into all of this AO business, I just think abstractly and write my thoughts.

    ...

    The key, I find, to Lit is not to treat it so methodically (although I appreciate that this doesn't work for everyone). The subject allows you to be exuberant in your prose. Look at the text from different perspectives and squeeze every possible meaning out of any poignant sentences.

    This is excellent advice for how to do Lit well. I'm convinced that, given the number of methodical, carbon-copy essays they read, the examiners appreciate a bit of verve and an individual approach.

    I commend you for being a fellow AO sceptic, sir!
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    (Original post by Yay For Jay)
    This is excellent advice for how to do Lit well. I'm convinced that, given the number of methodical, carbon-copy essays they read, the examiners appreciate a bit of verve and an individual approach.

    I commend you for being a fellow AO sceptic, sir!
    Hear hear.
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    (Original post by Pthaos)
    Speaking honestly I have no idea what sticchomithia or variation in turn length are.
    You don't need to know the technical terms, merely observe that the lines are short and shared between the speakers in a way which makes the scene fast paced, or say that some characters speak more than others because they are in control of the scene or whatever. Say what you see and don't leave things out because you think there's a fancy term for it which you don't know. Technical terms are fine and dandy, but they are only an aid to analysis, not the be all and end all of the job. Be careful not to use them like an I Spy checklist or Pokemon and try to get them all in.
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    (Original post by Cast.Iron)
    That's true. You obviously know more about this exam than I do so I'll take your word for it.
    Well, I certainly hope so, as I teach it, but the truth will out on results day! Last year was brilliant, but as they say in financial services ads, past performance is no guarantee of the future!
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    (Original post by Letterbomb31)
    Have you tried any mock papers and, if so, have you been able to make connections? If the answer to that is yes, then you have enough. If the answer to that is no, then you don't. As long as you know each of those texts well and are able to quote from them when relevant, that should be enough
    Excellent advice.
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    Hey guiiise. I just read through this thread, and y'all are so much better than me :'( I'm just going to fail this exam so much because I had the worst English teaching this year. I barely know any quotes, urgh. BUT ANYWAY. I came here to ask, is the exam morning or afternoon? And you know in the question where you compare two proses, you only link them to other prose you've read? It excludes drama/poems right? Urrgh, my class never tells me anything. So thanks for any help

    And seeing as everyone else has done it, I may as well tell y'all my wider reading ^.^

    Novels
    Jane Eyre
    The Magic Toyshop
    The Story of an Hour

    Plays
    The Homecoming
    Waiting for Godot
    She Conquers All (i think its called)
    Pygmalion

    Poems
    The Flea
    To his coy mistress
    To catch a falling star
    The Garden
    How do I love thee
    My mistresses eyes
    Air and Angels
 
 
 
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