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AQA English Literature A - Love Through the Ages June 2011 Exam :D watch

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    (Original post by iloveusernames)
    Hey guiiise. I just read through this thread, and y'all are so much better than me :'( I'm just going to fail this exam so much because I had the worst English teaching this year. I barely know any quotes, urgh. BUT ANYWAY. I came here to ask, is the exam morning or afternoon? And you know in the question where you compare two proses, you only link them to other prose you've read? It excludes drama/poems right? Urrgh, my class never tells me anything. So thanks for any help

    And seeing as everyone else has done it, I may as well tell y'all my wider reading ^.^

    Novels
    Jane Eyre
    The Magic Toyshop
    The Story of an Hour

    Plays
    The Homecoming
    Waiting for Godot
    She Conquers All (i think its called)
    Pygmalion

    Poems
    The Flea
    To his coy mistress
    To catch a falling star
    The Garden
    How do I love thee
    My mistresses eyes
    Air and Angels
    Are you referring to Sonnet 130? Probably best to know the actual 'names' of your sonnets .

    You seem a little light on Shakespeare?
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    [QUOTE=iloveusernames;32174685]Hey guiiise. I just read through this thread, and y'all are so much better than me :'( I'm just going to fail this exam so much because I had the worst English teaching this year. I barely know any quotes, urgh. BUT ANYWAY. I came here to ask, is the exam morning or afternoon? And you know in the question where you compare two proses, you only link them to other prose you've read? It excludes drama/poems right? Urrgh, my class never tells me anything. So thanks for any help

    Hii exam is at 9:00 (:

    Question a) is going to be two unseen extracts of the SAME genre. For this question, you can only link it to wider reading of the same genre. So yes, if it's prose and prose, you will only be credited for linking to prose wider reading.

    Question b) is two unseen extracts of the REMAINING genres. So if you had prose first, then you'll get drama and poetry for the second question. In this question, you can link to ANY genre, prose poetry or drama.

    Hope that helped (:

    Also want to stress like many of the other people here - don't get too stressed out about wider reading!!! It's only worth at the most, 30%, the focus is on your analysis of the unseen extracts.

    The examining board says you should have minimum THREE wider reading references - one from each genre.

    I've been taught that they prefer FEWER but MORE DETAILED references, rather than loads and loads of minor comments. For example, if the unseen extract is about homosexual love, a minor comment might be - similarly, Hall explores homosexual love in her novel "A Well of Loneliness".

    What I do for wider reading (and remember, you can make references about anything, whether it's a similar theme, linguistic technique, form, structure...) is to say something along the lines of: Similarly, blah blah also does this....I'll then DEVELOP that by giving more details (e.g., perhaps what the effect of the linguistic technique does for the poem, or through what characters is the theme explored etc etc) and then give a quote etc.

    Remember you can also contrast - but not something silly like "In the [unseen extract], blah blah uses repetition, enjambement, and symbolism. However, in [wider reading reference], blah blah uses none of those"

    If I were to contrast, I'd probably say that an author etc would have used a similar technique, form, structure, or explored a similar theme, but in a DIFFERENT way.

    I've only got 15 wider reading references, and not all of them are in loads of detail (i.e. form, structure, lang). I think you shouldn't go beyond around 15 in detail...tbh, I think 9 would be the minimum amount, with 3 in detail for each genre.

    Good luck every body!
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    can someone tell me about what they have on the importance of form for prose!?!?
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    Urrgh yeah I hate Shakespeare. I can not understand a word, and then when I go to read the translation I'm like "ohhh that's what he's talking about. i thought it was something completely different". I phail so much hahha.
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    also does narrative voice come under form or structure?
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    Form of a prose extract - mostly about the narrative viewpoint yes (and how this influences what we know of the character's mind - is it 3rd person but do we see more of one character than another, or is it a 3rd person omniscient narrator, or is it a 1st person narration and how much do they read into other characters?)
    Also about whether it is a bildungsroman (although hard to tell from an extract) or whatever like a frame narrative (although again it is hard to tell from the extract).

    Also look at dialogue to an extent - a certain amount can actually tie in with analysing the language

    Form of a drama is actually easier! Look at what is said (by who and how much they say) and what is left unsaid - are there any stage directions that are natable? Or does the audience react to something that isn't said necessarily?

    And also with each you can discuss the limitations of the genre. While in a play characters are able to talk for themselves, and the audience judges them on their own words and actions, are the audience influenced by the opinion of another character? Do we really see inside the thoughts of the actual character? The problem with plays in terms of what we think of characters revolves around do we really see what they actually think - are they subjective or do they relay their innermost thoughts through soliloquy?

    One of best examples is probs Anthony and Cleopatra - does the audience ever truly see the inner workings of Cleopatra's mind as she never soliloquises? Is she to some extent 'performing' to others on stage?

    How does the fact it is a play draw the audience to further understand the characters, or is it limited in it's 'character drawing'?
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    I just made this thread:

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1677046

    Feel free to add to it in any way! (Not only that - adding to it would be very welcome indeed )
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    (Original post by pianofluteftw)
    Form of a prose extract - mostly about the narrative viewpoint yes (and how this influences what we know of the character's mind - is it 3rd person but do we see more of one character than another, or is it a 3rd person omniscient narrator, or is it a 1st person narration and how much do they read into other characters?)
    Also about whether it is a bildungsroman (although hard to tell from an extract) or whatever like a frame narrative (although again it is hard to tell from the extract).

    Also look at dialogue to an extent - a certain amount can actually tie in with analysing the language

    Form of a drama is actually easier! Look at what is said (by who and how much they say) and what is left unsaid - are there any stage directions that are natable? Or does the audience react to something that isn't said necessarily?

    And also with each you can discuss the limitations of the genre. While in a play characters are able to talk for themselves, and the audience judges them on their own words and actions, are the audience influenced by the opinion of another character? Do we really see inside the thoughts of the actual character? The problem with plays in terms of what we think of characters revolves around do we really see what they actually think - are they subjective or do they relay their innermost thoughts through soliloquy?

    One of best examples is probs Anthony and Cleopatra - does the audience ever truly see the inner workings of Cleopatra's mind as she never soliloquises? Is she to some extent 'performing' to others on stage?

    How does the fact it is a play draw the audience to further understand the characters, or is it limited in it's 'character drawing'?
    thankyou!!
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    (Original post by ashleighwhitehouse)
    also does narrative voice come under form or structure?
    It could be either (dramatic monologue = form, multiple narrators in e.g. Wuthering Heights = structure), but it really doesn't matter because there's no reason to label it. Talk about it when it's relevant. People are stressing too much! As I've said elsewhere or earlier (I'm losing track of where I'm posting at the moment), the best essays are where the student has seen something really interesting and pursues an individual line of enquiry without sticking rigidly to a pre-prepared essay formula. Freshness of approach is a signifier of A and A* answers and you can weigh yourself down with too much reliance on labelling things for no real purpose.
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    It could be either (dramatic monologue = form, multiple narrators in e.g. Wuthering Heights = structure), but it really doesn't matter because there's no reason to label it. Talk about it when it's relevant. People are stressing too much! As I've said elsewhere or earlier (I'm losing track of where I'm posting at the moment), the best essays are where the student has seen something really interesting and pursues an individual line of enquiry without sticking rigidly to a pre-prepared essay formula. Freshness of approach is a signifier of A and A* answers and you can weigh yourself down with too much reliance on labelling things for no real purpose.
    yeah i know but.... there's no chance of me getting an A anyway! if people want an A, they don't leave it til two days before haha.

    i'm scared that i will cover two aspects of structure and not any of form or something, then will drop loads of marks :\
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    (Original post by ashleighwhitehouse)
    yeah i know but.... there's no chance of me getting an A anyway! if people want an A, they don't leave it til two days before haha.

    i'm scared that i will cover two aspects of structure and not any of form or something, then will drop loads of marks :\
    Your honesty is refreshing and charming.
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    For people who have studied 'A Streetcar Named Desire', what quotes do you have? I have several of Williams stage directions, the main quote of 'Haven't you ever travelled on that streetcar', and ones that portray Stanley's sexual motivation e.g. the coloured lights etc.
    Are there any other obviously good ones that I'm completely missing out on?!
    xxx

    Thanks to everyone posting on this thread it's so helpful
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    It could be either (dramatic monologue = form, multiple narrators in e.g. Wuthering Heights = structure), but it really doesn't matter because there's no reason to label it. Talk about it when it's relevant. People are stressing too much! As I've said elsewhere or earlier (I'm losing track of where I'm posting at the moment), the best essays are where the student has seen something really interesting and pursues an individual line of enquiry without sticking rigidly to a pre-prepared essay formula. Freshness of approach is a signifier of A and A* answers and you can weigh yourself down with too much reliance on labelling things for no real purpose.
    This is so true! Find a really good couple of points (my teacher called it her 'sexy idea' until the class just went silent) and stick to it - pointing out different ways it is emphasised or explored. They want to see development of an argument - not just a few things that could actually just be bullet pointed instead of written as a cogent response.
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    Your honesty is refreshing and charming.
    hahaha!
    to be honest, i have been really unorganised considering university relies on this. i think my passionate hate for the exam is what has caused it are you taking it or have you already?
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    (Original post by Rachel_Leah)
    For people who have studied 'A Streetcar Named Desire', what quotes do you have? I have several of Williams stage directions, the main quote of 'Haven't you ever travelled on that streetcar', and ones that portray Stanley's sexual motivation e.g. the coloured lights etc.
    Are there any other obviously good ones that I'm completely missing out on?!
    xxx

    Thanks to everyone posting on this thread it's so helpful
    Haven't got my copy to hand (and as a teacher I don't need to know them off by heart!) but a bit from where Stella is explaining to Blanche what is Stanley's attraction, maybe a bit from Blanche's account of the discovery of her husband's sexuality and another from Mitch's rejection of Blanche. Sorry I can't be more specific, but it's 3 years since I taught it and I'm too old to have a memory any more.
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    (Original post by pianofluteftw)
    This is so true! Find a really good couple of points (my teacher called it her 'sexy idea' until the class just went silent) and stick to it - pointing out different ways it is emphasised or explored. They want to see development of an argument - not just a few things that could actually just be bullet pointed instead of written as a cogent response.
    I think I shall steal the 'sexy idea' and watch my class cringe...
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    (Original post by Rachel_Leah)
    For people who have studied 'A Streetcar Named Desire', what quotes do you have? I have several of Williams stage directions, the main quote of 'Haven't you ever travelled on that streetcar', and ones that portray Stanley's sexual motivation e.g. the coloured lights etc.
    Are there any other obviously good ones that I'm completely missing out on?!
    xxx

    Thanks to everyone posting on this thread it's so helpful
    There's one that Blanche says I think about death being the opposite to desire - scene 9 I think - I'll check... "The opposite [of death] is desire" It's part of a longer quote but I can't find my copy of the text at the moment...
    Of course that links to the quote about the streetcar named desire and cemetery
    Oh and anything about masculinity or a struggle for equality in love I chuck in the one about """Every man is a King" And I am the king around here so don't forget it"
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    (Original post by ashleighwhitehouse)
    hahaha!
    to be honest, i have been really unorganised considering university relies on this. i think my passionate hate for the exam is what has caused it are you taking it or have you already?
    Bless you, my child, I teach it!
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    I think I shall steal the 'sexy idea' and watch my class cringe...
    Please go for it - my teacher made English A level so much better with her random phrases she came out with - another one is FOFO (F*** off Find out) when she was despairing that no one knew any context
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    any good quotes for tess of the d'ubervilles im finding it hard to pick a few out
 
 
 
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