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Views and reactions to 'homosexuality' watch

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    I personally don't believe that it's possible to define sexuality through the terms homosexual, bisexual or heterosexual. They are all in context of one another, and presuppose the idea that there are 2 sexes (I'd argue that everyone is poly-sexual in a sense).

    What I wish to discuss is what is acceptable, and immoral, or moral, or (most likely in most situations) morally neutral with regards to the following...

    ...X see's homosexual act and feels (as a result of seeing the act):
    1) Disgusted.
    2) Happy.
    3) Hateful.
    4) Scared.

    And acts:
    5) By looking at both of them and smiling.
    6) By beating the **** out of them.
    7) By telling them they're sick.
    8) By frowning at them.
    9) Avoids interaction with them (for example, if X didn't know they were gay, X would ask them what the time is).

    Do any of the first 4 scenarios (which aren't exclusive to the second set, which also may not be exclusive to each other, but we'll keep them separate for this) provide a justification or excuse for the actions in the second set.

    Do any of the scenarios in either set not need a justification, or do need a justification?

    Please explain your reply.
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    I personally don't believe that it's possible to define sexuality through the terms homosexual, bisexual or heterosexual. They are all in context of one another, and presuppose the idea that there are 2 sexes (I'd argue that everyone is poly-sexual in a sense).
    Maybe those terms don't quite cover everyone, but the majority of people fit quite easily into one of those categories. They're still a useful way of briefly describing what sort of person you are interested in.
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    I have no problem with gays.The problem is the overly flamboyant easily offended ones that TAKE EVERYTHING TO HEART, they are the problem. Why isnt there just an indifferent option?
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    (Original post by AwsomePossum)
    I have no problem with gays.The problem is the overly flamboyant easily offended ones that TAKE EVERYTHING TO HEART, they are the problem. Why isnt there just an indifferent option?
    You've mis-understood, I'm asking which are justified, unjustified, and aren't a matter of being justified or unjustified?
    And what are the reasons for that.

    Edit: Obviously within the examples and scenarios I've put forth.
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    Maybe those terms don't quite cover everyone, but the majority of people fit quite easily into one of those categories. They're still a useful way of briefly describing what sort of person you are interested in.
    That's not the point of the thread.
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    What I wish to discuss is what is acceptable, and immoral, or moral, or (most likely in most situations) morally neutral with regards to the following...

    ...X see's homosexual act and feels (as a result of seeing the act):
    1) Disgusted.
    2) Happy.
    3) Hateful.
    4) Scared.
    Why do we have to feel any of these? Some of us actually don't give a damn and just wouldn't react at all. :erm:
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    (Original post by hollywoodbudgie)
    Why do we have to feel any of these? Some of us actually don't give a damn and just wouldn't react at all. :erm:
    :erm: where did I say that they're the only reactions people can have?

    I'm just asking what peoples thoughts are on those reactions.
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    What I wish to discuss is what is acceptable, and immoral, or moral, or (most likely in most situations) morally neutral with regards to the following...

    ...X see's homosexual act and feels (as a result of seeing the act):
    1) Disgusted.
    2) Happy.
    3) Hateful.
    4) Scared.
    For 1 I think it depends if you're disgusted simply by the fact that they are doing it, or whether you're disgusted by the fact that you saw it. I mean I wouldn't want to see two men having sex, nor would I want to see two old people having sex, or even worse see my parents having sex. But I'm not really disgusted by the fact that they do it (in my parents' case, I'm glad they did!).
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    For 1 I think it depends if you're disgusted simply by the fact that they are doing it, or whether you're disgusted by the fact that you saw it. I mean I wouldn't want to see two men having sex, nor would I want to see two old people having sex, or even worse see my parents having sex. But I'm not really disgusted by the fact that they do it (in my parents' case, I'm glad they did!).
    So if you're disgusted because it happened, then it isn't, or at least might not be justifiable?
    But if you're just disgusted because it happened to be in front of you, then it's either justified or neutral?
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    So if you're disgusted because it happened, then it isn't, or at least might not be justifiable?
    Well I'd say it's quite bigoted to feel disgusted that people have gay sex.

    (Original post by there's too much love)
    But if you're just disgusted because it happened to be in front of you, then it's either justified or neutral?
    Well it's understandable, I'm not sure whether that makes it justified or not. It's hard to justify feelings.
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    Well I'd say it's quite bigoted to feel disgusted that people have gay sex.


    Well it's understandable, I'm not sure whether that makes it justified or not. It's hard to justify feelings.
    Is all bigotry automatically bad though? I mean unjustified has strong relations with something being bad or wrong in some manner.
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    Is all bigotry automatically bad though?
    Yes.
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    (Original post by No655321)
    Yes.
    Like I said in the OP, explain your answer.

    To put it another way, one point answers won't do.
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    Like I said in the OP, explain your answer.

    To put it another way, one point answers won't do.
    bigotry |?big?tr?|
    noun
    bigoted attitudes; intolerance toward those who hold different opinions from oneself.

    Intolerance towards someone based solely on the fact that their opinions are different is unjustifiable. You are free to disagree on moral or logical grounds, but not merely because of difference.

    Tbh I thought that was obvious, but hopefully this will clear it up for you.
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    (Original post by No655321)
    bigotry |?big?tr?|
    noun
    bigoted attitudes; intolerance toward those who hold different opinions from oneself.

    Intolerance towards someone based solely on the fact that their opinions are different is unjustifiable. You are free to disagree on moral or logical grounds, but not merely because of difference.

    Tbh I thought that was obvious, but hopefully this will clear it up for you.
    I can hold bigoted views about someone without expressing them. I can say to myself, or peers, away from a set of people "this type of person ought to be killed, I hate them" without killing them or letting them know I hate them. So a question arises of why that is in itself wrong?
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    I can hold bigoted views about someone without expressing them. I can say to myself, or peers, away from a set of people "this type of person ought to be killed, I hate them" without killing them or letting them know I hate them. So a question arises of why that is in itself wrong?
    Because you have no justification for hating this kind of person.

    I'm all for freedom of thought and expression, so I'm not saying you should be legally punished for it, but irrational hatred is morally unjustifiable, whether or not you express it.

    I would add that most people do experience irrational hatred of one kind or another at some point in their lives, but you've got to recognize that this emotion is something to unacceptable and to be dealt with and not nurture and expand on it.
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    I think what you're getting at here is quite interesting. I also don't know how much success you'll have with it on TSR.

    (Original post by there's too much love)
    I personally don't believe that it's possible to define sexuality through the terms homosexual, bisexual or heterosexual. They are all in context of one another, and presuppose the idea that there are 2 sexes (I'd argue that everyone is poly-sexual in a sense).
    To an extent, I would agree. I don't understand people who say, for example, 'I identify as a cis female and am only attracted to men' - it presupposes that everyone falls into the categories 'male' and 'female', and that every 'man' has an XY body, and that everyone with an XY body is a man.

    What I wish to discuss is what is acceptable, and immoral, or moral, or (most likely in most situations) morally neutral with regards to the following...

    ...X see's homosexual act and feels (as a result of seeing the act):
    1) Disgusted.
    2) Happy.
    3) Hateful.
    4) Scared.
    As emotions which stay purely inside of X's head, any of these emotions are acceptable and moral. Having a thought in itself isn't a wrong or right thing to do; it's a reaction which you can't help. If X then goes to act on the negative emotions, or lets them alter their perception of anyone else they know, or lets them affect their worldview in any way, then acting on disgust, hate or fear is wrong if it harms others. But just feeling them is not inherently wrong. It's a pity and not something I would endorse, but I don't think it's actively immoral until it's harmed someone else (or X themselves, if it causes them to repress their sexuality).

    And acts:
    5) By looking at both of them and smiling.
    6) By beating the **** out of them.
    7) By telling them they're sick.
    8) By frowning at them.
    9) Avoids interaction with them (for example, if X didn't know they were gay, X would ask them what the time is).
    I think that when you bring the emotions into an actual action, this is when you can attach a morality to them. 6, 7 and 8 are wrong as they cause harm to the couple themselves; 9 doesn't actively harm the couple as a one-off event, but it would harm them if everyone did it (so if they became social pariahs) and it would harm X if, for example, X desperately needed to know the time and was late to something because they didn't want to talk to the couple, or if this feeling that same-sex couples should not be spoken to harmed X's relationship with someone else. So depending on 9's consequences, it could also be wrong. 5 depends if the couple notice and why it's being done. It could be taken as tacit encouragement, a sort of 'well done for being brave enough to be gay in public'; equally, though, it could be quite patronising or disconcerting. It would depend on the spirit in which it was meant.
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    You've mis-understood, I'm asking which are justified, unjustified, and aren't a matter of being justified or unjustified?
    And what are the reasons for that.

    Edit: Obviously within the examples and scenarios I've put forth.
    I see, apologies good sir
 
 
 
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