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    (Original post by M | k e)
    no more anything for me now
    &Meeee !!
    Wooooohooo; we can live freely without remembering all the transition metals !!
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    (Original post by Seasick Steve)
    Also, there was another weird question like "describe an experiment to show that Aluminium oxide contained ions?" I really just put down random rubbish there just as the invigilator told us to put our pens down.
    I put react with acid and observe if salt and water are product as ionic oxides act as bases
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    (Original post by Seasick Steve)
    Also, there was another weird question like "describe an experiment to show that Aluminium oxide contained ions?" I really just put down random rubbish there just as the invigilator told us to put our pens down.
    I know; I was thinkin WTH ? Then I just put it's amphoteric and doesn't react with water. All that I could think of at that time. Fail aha
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    (Original post by mrppaulo)
    Okay I was thinking that I should leave out the H+ and H20 parts in the cell do you think I'll lose a mark for putting H+ in? I know in one past paper it said ignore H+ if used?
    Well, I don't remember any of my textbooks or revision guides saying H+ or H2O. H+ implies acidic conditions anyway, so I don't know either way really. I think it's sort of implied that the ions are in aqueous solution, so I didn't feel the need to include it. That's my logic at least.
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    (Original post by Seasick Steve)
    Also, there was another weird question like "describe an experiment to show that Aluminium oxide contained ions?" I really just put down random rubbish there just as the invigilator told us to put our pens down.
    I put melt it and pass an electrical current through it. If it had ions it would conduct electricity :/
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    (Original post by mrppaulo)
    Okay I was thinking that I should leave out the H+ and H20 parts in the cell do you think I'll lose a mark for putting H+ in? I know in one past paper it said ignore H+ if used?
    Yeah... I wasn't sure whether or not to include H+ and H2O and was a bit confused on using the "," or "|" between Ag and AgO... I hope they don't penalise for that...
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    (Original post by Seasick Steve)
    Also, there was another weird question like "describe an experiment to show that Aluminium oxide contained ions?" I really just put down random rubbish there just as the invigilator told us to put our pens down.
    That was the one question in the paper I really had no idea on, but a friend afterwards said he put something about electrolysis and going molten/conducting electricity? I talked about melting points and bond strength just to fill the gap but was definitely not the right answer hehe.
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    (Original post by mrppaulo)
    I put react with acid and observe if salt and water are product as ionic oxides act as bases
    I put mix with alkali, as Al(OH)4 - is formed it shows that it dissolves in polar solution or something showing its ionic? :s
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    Sometimes threads like this make me feel gutted; after I realise my answers were just ridiculous
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    (Original post by SirMuffin)
    Yeah... I wasn't sure whether or not to include H+ and H2O and was a bit confused on using the "," or "|" between Ag and AgO... I hope they don't penalise for that...
    Well the | symbolises a change in state and the Ag and AgO were both solid, so comma should have been used :3 no idea how fussy they are or if they'll penalise though.
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    (Original post by Stirlo)
    I put melt it and pass an electrical current through it. If it had ions it would conduct electricity :/
    That would make sense. I wasn't thinking along those lines so I said calculate experimental and theoretical enthalpies to show the degree of ionic bonding present in the compound.
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    why did sodium oxide form an alkali solution in water
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    also for the electrocell representation one I put Zn(s)|Zn2+(aq)||AgO(s)|H+(aq)|Ag (s) instead of putting the AgO and Ag in the same boundary :/ Would it still be correct?
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    (Original post by M | k e)
    Well the | symbolises a change in state and the Ag and AgO were both solid, so comma should have been used :3 no idea how fussy they are or if they'll penalise though.
    I put a | for that, didn't think about the comma. But in a past paper I think it does comment on the use of , and |, I'm hoping it's allow either, will try and find it in my pile of paper
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    (Original post by Stirlo)
    I put melt it and pass an electrical current through it. If it had ions it would conduct electricity :/
    I said this!
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    (Original post by A-level11)
    why did sodium oxide form an alkali solution in water
    i wrote it disociates and forms OH- which results in high ph. wa did u write?
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    (Original post by mrppaulo)
    haha yeah rite been reciting them for weeks then only last question was half about them it was quite a good paper i see your applying for physics too did you enjoy the 6 marks for energy level changing and E=hf I was loving that page :cool:
    Yeah, haha, an easy 6 marks (hopefully ). I don't see why they can't use consistent symbols throughout both physics and chemistry though, it's E=hf not \DeltaE=hv! :p:
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    same
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    for the question on the first page did people add the deltah lattice formation with hydration of the 2 elements added together
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    For that cell X question I put that I thought that it would be fuel cell but then in brackets bluffed about primary cells... are they completely different or could they be thought of as the same?

    Why did the e.m.f. start to decrease with the first graph? I said that the products would increase and H20 may start to evaporate so the equilibrium may start to be established. Just couldn't articulate myself and had no idea what to say!

    Overall I think it was an alright paper except those fuel cell questions, so I'm predicting 84 would be needed for an a*?
 
 
 
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