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rednirt
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#1
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Contrary to what you guys are all thinking the tuition fees bill has NOT BEEN PASSED!!!! Doesn't anyone even do law AS anymore?

This was only the first voting in the house of commons - its still got another reading, a second vote and then it moves up to the Lords who will have to vote on it again.

Things may not be as bleak as you fear
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AT82
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(Original post by rednirt)
Contrary to what you guys are all thinking the tuition fees bill has NOT BEEN PASSED!!!! Doesn't anyone even do law AS anymore?

This was only the first voting in the house of commons - its still got another reading, a second vote and then it moves up to the Lords who will have to vote on it again.

Things may not be as bleak as you fear
Yeah but its very likely next time it goes to the vote it will be voted in. I am not sure if I support it or not to be honest. I just still think there must be a better way.
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Muse
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(Original post by rednirt)
Contrary to what you guys are all thinking the tuition fees bill has NOT BEEN PASSED!!!! Doesn't anyone even do law AS anymore?

This was only the first voting in the house of commons - its still got another reading, a second vote and then it moves up to the Lords who will have to vote on it again.

Things may not be as bleak as you fear
I think our Tony has pretty much had his way.
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rednirt
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I have to say i agree with you, the possibility that the Lords will not pass it is about as slim as my bank balance at the moment- incredibly. Its just that everyone thinks its already been passed and they are being wrong!!!
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Mark_KK
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(Original post by rednirt)
Contrary to what you guys are all thinking the tuition fees bill has NOT BEEN PASSED!!!! Doesn't anyone even do law AS anymore?

This was only the first voting in the house of commons - its still got another reading, a second vote and then it moves up to the Lords who will have to vote on it again.

Things may not be as bleak as you fear
Basically this was the second reading and first division (vote).

It will now go to a standing committee followed by the report stage after which there is a third reading. The third reading is mainly to discuss and vote on amendments I believe - the main bill in principle has already been passed.

After which it will go to the House Of Lords but I believe that as it involves public finance they do not have the power of delay as they cannot delay "money bills".

The above is my understanding based on my studies of As and A2 Governemnt and Politics (funnily enough I dont actually need to know how legislation is passed for the exam!!!) . I am not doing it at degree level (yet!) but have made reference to a degree level text book whilst looking this up.

Basically its good as thru, there may be some slight scuffles over the third reading but its not going to be stopped .

Please - if anyone of greater knowledge in this area wishes to correct me I would be grateful .
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Muse
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(Original post by rednirt)
I have to say i agree with you, the possibility that the Lords will not pass it is about as slim as my bank balance at the moment- incredibly. Its just that everyone thinks its already been passed and they are being wrong!!!
Well if the chance is as slim as my bank balance, which is in the negative, then there may be a chance they will not pass it
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rednirt
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(Original post by Mark_KK)

After which it will go to the House Of Lords but I believe that as it involves public finance they do not have the power of delay as they cannot delay "money bills".
I was of the impression that that was only strictly for the chancellors budget (after the lords messed with it once aftre the first world war and p*ssed everyone off)
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Mark_KK
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(Original post by rednirt)
I was of the impression that that was only strictly for the chancellors budget (after the lords messed with it once aftre the first world war and p*ssed everyone off)
Not sure...my degree level textbook (which I keep although I am doing AS and A2) is really annoying because it goes into great detail in some areas but very little in others. As a result of this I am unsure what constitutes a "money bill".
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emom100
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(Original post by rednirt)
I was of the impression that that was only strictly for the chancellors budget (after the lords messed with it once aftre the first world war and p*ssed everyone off)
thats what i thought. Technically i eould guess it counts as an education bill rather than a money bill
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Mark_KK
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#10
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I have just spoken to a Government and Politics teacher who is certaily more "in the know" then most of us here, myself included .

He said that the third reading could be crucial although by convention anyone who wanted to reject a bill in principle should do it at the second reading. It is uncommon (although not unheard of) for a bill to be defeated at thid reading.

He also stated that the Lords could delay it which would cause all sorts of trouble for the Government as they want to pass it in this parliament to avoid having to do a complete repatition after the next general election (assuming that they get in that is).

Apparantly it would not be a money bill, or so he thinks!!!
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PQ
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Luckily for the Government the Lords contains the lovely Lord Dearing (the independant who proposed top up fees back in 1997 and who is delighted at the current proposals because he say's they're how it should have been done all along (and I have to say I agree with him and have been ranting along these lines since 1998)).

He tore Mandy Telford (NUS president and general selfish cow) to pieces on last night's BBC2 special without even breaking a sweat.

I always liked the tone of the Dearing report but never had any idea what the man in question was like - and it turns out he's lovely
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rednirt
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(Original post by Pencil Queen)
Luckily for the Government the Lords contains the lovely Lord Dearing (the independant who proposed top up fees back in 1997 and who is delighted at the current proposals because he say's they're how it should have been done all along (and I have to say I agree with him and have been ranting along these lines since 1998)).

He tore Mandy Telford (NUS president and general selfish cow) to pieces on last night's BBC2 special without even breaking a sweat.

I always liked the tone of the Dearing report but never had any idea what the man in question was like - and it turns out he's lovely
That mandy Telford is soooo annoying! I'm embaressed that she represents all us students, whenever she appears on tv its obvious she's probably not the best candidate for the job... but then again, who'd want such a role at our age?
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