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Regarding Ed Miliband and Labour Leadership watch

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    I think he was chosen as somebody who could ride out the present years - adverse economy, protests, cuts and the like - whilst not being considered as a genuine contender for the next election. i.e. the better candiate, who is thought to stand a better chahce at the next general election, won't have to make promise after promsie and can ly low during this austerity.

    Prior to the next electon, Ed will stand down, and David Milliband will become the Labour leader. He won't have any baggage from, say, Sunday's demo, and the like. Not only that, but a new leader, generally more popular than Ed, will boost Labour's poll ratings.
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    I would be seriously seriously surprised if that was the case, seeing as we saw that more MPs voted for David than Ed, and Ed only became leader due to Union backing, and whilst I think that Unions need to be involved in the selection of Labour leaders, I doubt they were thinking as far along the line as you suggest.

    Ed doesn't need to stand down anyway, at the next election, he'll be fine.
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    (Original post by Rodion Raskolnikow)
    I think he was chosen as somebody who could ride out the present years - adverse economy, protests, cuts and the like - whilst not being considered as a genuine contender for the next election. i.e. the better candiate, who is thought to stand a better chahce at the next general election, won't have to make promise after promsie and can ly low during this austerity.

    Prior to the next electon, Ed will stand down, and David Milliband will become the Labour leader. He won't have any baggage from, say, Sunday's demo, and the like. Not only that, but a new leader, generally more popular than Ed, will boost Labour's poll ratings.
    Thats quite difficult when the Labour leader is picked via votes by the party MP's and such.

    Although I do agree Ed will stand down before the next election. Not sure about david taking over though We shall see
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    (Original post by Mann18)
    I would be seriously seriously surprised if that was the case, seeing as we saw that more MPs voted for David than Ed, and Ed only became leader due to Union backing, and whilst I think that Unions need to be involved in the selection of Labour leaders, I doubt they were thinking as far along the line as you suggest.

    Ed doesn't need to stand down anyway, at the next election, he'll be fine.
    I can't really see him wooing the electorate.
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    In the next series of TV Debates, I can't help but think he would be decimated by Cameron and Clegg.
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    (Original post by Rodion Raskolnikow)
    I can't really see him wooing the electorate.
    Literally, all he'll have to do is stand there and say:

    "Would you rather have Nick Clegg, a man who has shown his admirable sense of morality seems to desert him whenever the scent of power draws close?"
    The answer to that question will be a resounding no.

    Then it's a straight fight between us and the Tories. Then all he has to say is:

    "Your predictions for the economy weren't correct, you've endangered the recovery needlessly, made the most vulnerable members of society be the one's bearing the burden of the cuts, instead of the bankers who actually caused them."

    Seems pretty simple.

    I should add, I don't necessarily agree with those comments, but I know what I'd be doing if I were him, staying relatively quiet for now, as there is no need to make too much noise, then, come election time, just rattle off the worst stats and he'll win. Lib Dem voters will vote Labour this time around in their droves, they'll lose a lot of student constituencies for sure.

    I feel quite sorry for them in a way, as I feel they've protected us from most of the more outrageous policies of the Tories, at their own expense though sadly.
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    (Original post by Will Lucky)
    In the next series of TV Debates, I can't help but think he would be decimated by Cameron and Clegg.
    I can't see Clegg decimating anything besides his own parties number of votes at this point.
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    It's says a lot that even though the coalition is very unpopular, people still can't give a crap about Ed Miliband. True, people are turning back to Labour in bi-elections, but only because pushed there by the coalition, Miliband is doing nothing to actively pull them in; he has all the charisma of a lamppost. If Labour currently had a leader like David Miliband or Tony Blair the Tories would look stuffed for the next election, yet somehow Labour have managed to rummage around in their benches and pull out the sole man in the party who might lose them the next election, if he makes it that far.
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    (Original post by Ripper)
    I can't see Clegg decimating anything besides his own parties number of votes at this point.
    Why not? The problem with the Lib Dems was never so much that people disliked them, but that they were not seen as a credible party of government. Now they've demonstrated themselves to be so, and indeed to be a possible liberal, centralising influence on any potential government which comes along be it Labour or Conservative. A Lib Dem vote has never seemed more useful.

    Sure, plenty of tossers will harp on about tuition fees. But there's only so long you can punish a political party for making a foolish pledge. Hell, up here in Scotland, we've basically forgotten that the SNP got into office on a pledge of abolishing all student debt.

    Clegg is credible and, above all, a nice and likable sort of guy. I'm sure he can pull things back - and for all we know, the Lib Dems could end doing rather better than before.
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    (Original post by Craig_D)
    It's says a lot that even though the coalition is very unpopular, people still can't give a crap about Ed Miliband. True, people are turning back to Labour in bi-elections, but only because pushed there by the coalition, Miliband is doing nothing to actively pull them in; he has all the charisma of a lamppost. If Labour currently had a leader like David Miliband or Tony Blair the Tories would look stuffed for the next election, yet somehow Labour have managed to rummage around in their benches and pull out the sole man in the party who might lose them the next election, if he makes it that far.
    In my experience, all party leaders start out pretty ****. I don't think you can suggest a Tony Blair or David Miliband type figure could simply have waltzed in and made the Labour Party electable again.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    In my experience, all party leaders start out pretty ****. I don't think you can suggest a Tony Blair or David Miliband type figure could simply have waltzed in and made the Labour Party electable again.
    Well I certainly am not suggesting that anyone could walk into the job and immediately give them their 1997 buzz again, in the short term they clearly have the ghost of Brown looming over them. I do think it's possible however, with the right propaganda and the right leader, that they could turn their fortunes by 2015 enough to achieve a solid win; I don't think Miliband is that leader. Major had a popularity boost on becoming leader, as did Blair, Cameron and even Brown, that was despite the reputations of their predecessors. Reaction to Miliband however has been lukewarm, even though many think the coalition are wrongly doing 'ideological cuts' he still isn't securing interest in him personally. The sight of him addressing the March 26th protests and trying to establish himself as some sort of figurehead for the protesters (and failing) was pretty hilarious, especially given that as the Leader of the Opposition he shouldn't even need to earn that role.
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    Hell be fine. Not fine enough to win an election, but that is four years away- a lot of time to develop. My thinking will be that he ends up becoming the next Neil Kinnock, which tbh, isnt a bad thing at all.
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    Ed Miliband is the only credible leader of a political party in the UK, and Labour are the only credible political party. The general election will be a breeze for Ed. As the economy sinks into the abyss under the ConDem sham coalition, even Daily Mail reading Tories will be begging for the chance to once again suck on the sweet teats of Labour governance.
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    (Original post by Teveth)
    Ed Miliband is the only credible leader of a political party in the UK, and Labour are the only credible political party. The general election will be a breeze for Ed. As the economy sinks into the abyss under the ConDem sham coalition, even Daily Mail reading Tories will be begging for the chance to once again suck on the sweet teats of Labour governance.
    Credible? Are you mentally ill? To be credible requires some sort of plan, Labour are currently utterly devoid of any ideas or solutions for the countrys problems. They are nothing more than a vacuous opposition jumping on any anti-government bandwagon they can find.
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    (Original post by Teveth)
    Ed Miliband is the only credible leader of a political party in the UK, and Labour are the only credible political party. The general election will be a breeze for Ed. As the economy sinks into the abyss under the ConDem sham coalition, even Daily Mail reading Tories will be begging for the chance to once again suck on the sweet teats of Labour governance.
    Are you some sort of comedian? Just don't give up the day job though.
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    (Original post by mac_manutd)
    Credible? Are you mentally ill? To be credible requires some sort of plan, Labour are currently utterly devoid of any ideas or solutions for the countrys problems. They are nothing more than a vacuous opposition jumping on any anti-government bandwagon they can find.
    That sounds very similar to Cameron's Tory Party in opposition.
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    (Original post by Teveth)
    That sounds very similar to Cameron's Tory Party in opposition.
    Yes and I see then you don't disagree with the point, so how can you possibly say that Labour are currently a credible party of government?
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    (Original post by Teveth)
    That sounds very similar to Cameron's Tory Party in opposition.
    Yes, and I'd argue that the Tories weren't credible when they were doing the same in opposition. Ed Miliband claims there is an alternative but declines to share it with us.
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    (Original post by Teveth)
    That sounds very similar to Cameron's Tory Party in opposition.
    Not really. It takes quite a lot of skill to harp on about an alternative yet not be able to tell anyone what this alternative is.
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    The margin by which Mili-E got elected was very slim. Mili-D won the votes of the MPs and the members, but lost out on the affiliate organisations, which included the unions. So Mili-E wasn't chosen by all sections of the party.

    Mili-E is still a new leader. It took Cameron around two years to decide on exactly what he wanted to portray to the country and how to do this.

    All the while Cameron was surrounded by people who were thinking of ways to modernise and rejuvenate the Conservative Party. Yes, Ed Miliband and Douglas Alexander are attempting to recreate the Labour Party. However, they're not doing it fast enough. I can only speculate at why this is, but I believe they lack the strong vision and tenacity of New Labour.

    A change in leadership so close to a general election would be suicidal, particularly if the party doesn't have credible policies to offer the electorate. David Miliband would be a fool to lead his party into the political wilderness. I doubt Saturday's 'March for the Alternative' demonstration will tar Ed Miliband. He did what any leader in opposition with political shrewdness would do. He also painstakingly made it clear he wasn't there in support of the unions, but of the 'mainstream majority' and that he supports cuts, just disagrees about the particulars. The way the media handled that was disgraceful, imo.

    Mili-E is taxed with the difficult task of rebranding the party and winning Labour's core voters, in addition to the elusive 'Middle Britain'. He won the Labour leadership because he won the strategic game and showed he has the ruthless ambition to succeed. However, he now needs to be a strong leader to unite and recreate his party. I wouldn't write him off just yet, but would wait to see what he has to offer. And I wish he'd embrace the party's New Labour past though and take the best from it, instead of trying to brush the period 1997-2010 under the carpet.
 
 
 
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