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    (Original post by Inst1nct)
    I've recently received an offer from Kings college london to study computer science with a year in industry. I have marked this as my firm choice.

    I was wondering if anyone who already studies at the University doing this course tell me about what the first years are like. Looking at the modules offered n the first and second year, it doesn't look interesting at all. Also some are not clear as to what is done, for example: Foundations of Computing.

    However, since it's my best offer received in comparison (City - Software Engineering, Queen - Comp Sci Sandwich) with others I've opted to go for it.

    It just would be nice to know what I'm getting myself into...
    Alright buddy! First of all well done on your placement. Kings is a top uni, i attend there myself.

    Maybe you should have looked at the course structure and modules in particular, beforehand. If they don't seem appealing, then maybe you have re-considered opting for kings.

    Generally, first year is not too difficult. A lot of the content resembles A-level (to get everyone up to scratch) and builds slowly from that. Don't worry too much as long as you work from time-to-time, you should be fine. Also, your first year may only be a pass year so the pressures off!
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    KCL and Manchester for CS which one is better? i got offers from these 2..
    i quite like London so haaa=] the location of KCL is a highlight..
    but heard some ppl saying manchester is famous for computer science?

    i know nth abt programming and stuff, so will this make a huge difference in the first sem?
    will i be very behind or ?
    im going to watch the youtube video.. thx for the link=]

    is there any exchange program in KCL or Manchester.. e.g. to US?
    and how's the job prospects.?

    my relatives thought it is stupid not to study in London so im kind of uncertain wt i should do..
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    (Original post by mosa901)
    i've just received a offer from king's college even tough my gcse maths was at a grad C
    my question is basically how much would i have to improve my maths skills in order to achinve in this uni
    what did you at collage btec or a levels and what grades did you get
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    (Original post by muthan)
    what did you at collage btec or a levels and what grades did you get
    I done a Btec level 3 extended and got triple D* and i currently go to kings college
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    The problem with most University degrees these days is they are too focused on one core language. Not being funny but C++ and Java are getting out-dated. There might be a lot of jobs for them but most of those jobs are finding their way to India and developing countries.

    I started off as a Web Developer around Post-Uni age. It wasn't much different to as it is now. But you couldn't find long term work without knowing at-least 5 other languages.
    I never went to Uni but a lot of my friends did. I guess that is the reason why I haven't had my mind compiled in one language.

    Now I noticed the OP was thinking about learning C. I wouldn't recommend it mate. There are to many other more capable languages which have replaced it. If you want to learn a a bundle which you could use with Java I would go for JAVA/C#/PYTHON/JAVASCRIPT/HTML5. The reason for these is because you want languages which your muscle memory can remember. JAVA is similar to C#. PYTHON & JAVA-SCRIPT share some layout features for OOP. You also don't want to marginalise yourself to 1 thing. You could be making a tablet app one day and then a fully functional machinery program the next day. Being flexible is where the money is.

    If you want to be a bit of a revolutionary I would start looking into Ruby. I am amazed in how easy it is. I am some what angry though since I have spent most of my days fighting with tag blocks and any Web Devy knows what I am talking about.
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    (Original post by illegaltobepoor)
    The problem with most University degrees these days is they are too focused on one core language. Not being funny but C++ and Java are getting out-dated. There might be a lot of jobs for them but most of those jobs are finding their way to India and developing countries.

    I started off as a Web Developer around Post-Uni age. It wasn't much different to as it is now. But you couldn't find long term work without knowing at-least 5 other languages.
    I never went to Uni but a lot of my friends did. I guess that is the reason why I haven't had my mind compiled in one language.

    Now I noticed the OP was thinking about learning C. I wouldn't recommend it mate. There are to many other more capable languages which have replaced it. If you want to learn a a bundle which you could use with Java I would go for JAVA/C#/PYTHON/JAVASCRIPT/HTML5. The reason for these is because you want languages which your muscle memory can remember. JAVA is similar to C#. PYTHON & JAVA-SCRIPT share some layout features for OOP. You also don't want to marginalise yourself to 1 thing. You could be making a tablet app one day and then a fully functional machinery program the next day. Being flexible is where the money is.

    If you want to be a bit of a revolutionary I would start looking into Ruby. I am amazed in how easy it is. I am some what angry though since I have spent most of my days fighting with tag blocks and any Web Devy knows what I am talking about.
    Exactly. That's a problem for us though.
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    (Original post by fa90)
    I'm currently a first year at King's studying Computer Science.

    Unfortunately (maybe fortunately?) your first year does count towards your degree. It counts roughly about 10-11% of your degree (1/9). The course is pretty intense, it's not really like other courses where you can doss in your first year and get through with scraping a pass. Unfortunately, you will have to work really hard in your first year, and make sure you attend lectures, go to all your tutorials and make sure to complete all your Lab material.

    In regards to the module Foundations of Computing (FC1). FC1 is the only maths based module in the first year and you will do that module in your first semester.

    These will be your modules next year (unless they change, which I doubt they will):

    First semester:-

    PRP - Programming Practice, Java
    FC1 - Foundations of Computing, Maths based module
    ELA - Elementary Logic with Applications, Logic module
    CS1- Computer Systems, looking at the architecture and design of Computers, like binary, MARIE, Pipelines, ISA's etc.

    Second semester:-

    PRA - Programming Applications, building GUI applications in Java and doing bit more advanced programming.
    PEP - Practical Experience Programming, programming module. This module could change, because the year before us had something totally different. We've had three lab assessments for this module which make up the full grade.
    AI - Artificial Intelligence
    DST - Data Structures, once again Java based module, concentrating on Data Structuring.



    I unfortunately didn't work as hard as I should have and therefore did not do that well in my January Exams!!

    The course itself is ok, though a lot of people complain on the course that they aren't enjoying it, but I think it's because they didn't expect to be doing that much programming.

    One thing I would HIGHLY recommend you to do is learn Java during your summer holidays. And make sure you do all your tutorials and most importantly all the work you get in your Lab sessions. The success behind passing the exams are doing all your tutorials and labs!! If you can ace that, you will fly through the exam!

    Another thing, a lot of people from King's go on to work at Investment Banks. Computer Science is not exactly reputable at King's, but the university itself is. I have attended many many social events (extra curricular activities) that I do outside of Uni and everyone seems to be quite impressed when they ask/find out that I go to King's. So that is indeed a bonus!

    As long as your willing to work hard and are committed you will be fine!

    Hope this helps..



    EDIT: Forgot to mention that for Year of Industry, you HAVE to get an average of 60%>(2:1) in your first year in order to be able to do a placement. They will not let you do a placement if your average is lower than 60!
    What do you think of the informatics department, are there plenty of computers and areas to work, is the building nice?

    Also have you visited Warwick or Birmingham or any others unis, if so how would you compare them to king's?
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    Im also considering doing computer science at kings. What is the timetable like? like how many hours a week etc.
 
 
 
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