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    Does anyone know whether you can take your own copy of your poetry book e.g. John Clare into the exam or do you have to use a blank copy without notes in?
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    (Original post by feens)
    Does anyone know whether you can take your own copy of your poetry book e.g. John Clare into the exam or do you have to use a blank copy without notes in?
    You'll get given a blank copy - no notes are allowed. It might be useful to take a pencil in with you to make fresh notes on the blank copy as you're planning your answer, though. That's definitely allowed.
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    okay thank you
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    I took this exam twice (once in June and to boost my marks to 114/120 in the retake in january) so I can safely say I know a lot about it haha. I studied the Thomas Hardy poems. If anybody else joins this thread and has any other questions, either quote me on here, pm me, or facebook me via the name in my sig

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    (Original post by Rachel_Leah)
    I took this exam twice (once in June and to boost my marks to 114/120 in the retake in january) so I can safely say I know a lot about it haha. I studied the Thomas Hardy poems. If anybody else joins this thread and has any other questions, either quote me on here, pm me, or facebook me via the name in my sig

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    Hi, my school studied Thomas Hardy's poems using "Thomas Hardy: Everyman poetry", will we get a fresh copy of that or just another booklet with random poems from Hardy? Also, could you give any advice on how to write a good essay for English lit? I think I have the knowledge, just not the technique.
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    (Original post by zumgluck)
    Hi, my school studied Thomas Hardy's poems using "Thomas Hardy: Everyman poetry", will we get a fresh copy of that or just another booklet with random poems from Hardy? Also, could you give any advice on how to write a good essay for English lit? I think I have the knowledge, just not the technique.
    Hey, yeah that's what we got in the exam I doubt they'd confuse you! And if you mean for the Hardy question, there are two forms of question. The first will be the one with a 'named' poem, and it will ask how it is key to the collection, if it is a suitable beginning/end to the collection or something like that. The second will be an opinion, usually a critic's, of Hardy's poetry, e.g. 'Hardy shows sympathy for animals' and you have to do the two sides of the debate. I think once you've decided on which question you prefer (I always done the critic one!) make sure you read through poems which stand out to you and can create two sides to an argument, and then pick out similarities and differences in the poems in tone, form, structure and language. I usually do an introduction explaining the general feelings in the poem, which is AO1. Then pick out three/four good points of comparison relating to FSL, and use quotes to back these up if possible, and try to integrate, examiners LOVE that. Then, once they have been made soundly, save your best point to last and use it in your conclusion to say why the poem is key to the collection, WHY he is very sympathetic or not etc, and that saves a conclusion that just repeats what you have already said

    I hope that helped, if you need anything else feel free to PM me? x
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    (Original post by Rachel_Leah)
    Hey, yeah that's what we got in the exam I doubt they'd confuse you! And if you mean for the Hardy question, there are two forms of question. The first will be the one with a 'named' poem, and it will ask how it is key to the collection, if it is a suitable beginning/end to the collection or something like that. The second will be an opinion, usually a critic's, of Hardy's poetry, e.g. 'Hardy shows sympathy for animals' and you have to do the two sides of the debate. I think once you've decided on which question you prefer (I always done the critic one!) make sure you read through poems which stand out to you and can create two sides to an argument, and then pick out similarities and differences in the poems in tone, form, structure and language. I usually do an introduction explaining the general feelings in the poem, which is AO1. Then pick out three/four good points of comparison relating to FSL, and use quotes to back these up if possible, and try to integrate, examiners LOVE that. Then, once they have been made soundly, save your best point to last and use it in your conclusion to say why the poem is key to the collection, WHY he is very sympathetic or not etc, and that saves a conclusion that just repeats what you have already said

    I hope that helped, if you need anything else feel free to PM me? x
    thanks!
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    (Original post by Rachel_Leah)
    I took this exam twice (once in June and to boost my marks to 114/120 in the retake in january) so I can safely say I know a lot about it haha. I studied the Thomas Hardy poems. If anybody else joins this thread and has any other questions, either quote me on here, pm me, or facebook me via the name in my sig

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    In the second part (1hour) question, when doing the three text should I compare them? my teacher said it wasn't necessary and that I just needed to relate each book back to the question.
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    (Original post by Threepigs)
    In the second part (1hour) question, when doing the three text should I compare them? my teacher said it wasn't necessary and that I just needed to relate each book back to the question.
    If you mean in the Vic lit contextual linking part, I didn't compare the three texts but I guess you could if it was relevant. For example if it is an extract about women, and you could link up a certain book to an aspect in the extract, but also had another link to that book, that's fine. My teacher stressed to us that there are so many ways of 'getting out' to your wider reading, i.e. comparing through tone, subject matter, form, structure, language (so any other person that might use metaphors - literally what I did!) and you can also compare differences so it's pretty cool.
    Sorry I'm going off on a tangent lol, basically just make sure the quotes/points you put in can be compared to the extract, whether that be through any of the above aspects. Examiners need to be reminded WHY you've put in that quote/point otherwise they'll think you don't know that much, which you obvs do
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    Tips on how to get a high grade? What do examiners look for?
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    (Original post by Rachel_Leah)
    I took this exam twice (once in June and to boost my marks to 114/120 in the retake in january) so I can safely say I know a lot about it haha. I studied the Thomas Hardy poems. If anybody else joins this thread and has any other questions, either quote me on here, pm me, or facebook me via the name in my sig

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    Hey, seeing as you have taken this exam recently, do you have any idea of possible Section B questions for the May 2011 exam? Thanks
 
 
 
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