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Should Critical thinking be a core subject at GCSE? watch

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    As the title says, should Critical thinking be a core [and therefore compulsory] subject at GCSE level? Personally, I feel it would be of great benefit to individuals doing the GCSE syllabus, because it promotes core reasoning skills which are beneficial across all other subjects, aswell as helping individuals identify key argument elements, dispute them, and construct their own arguments.

    Do you think it could potentially lead to a society where debate is more refined, and therefore more productive?

    Thoughts?
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    There are lots of courses like that such as politics that would have the same effect. Whilst we all know how useful they are, kids don't. They would just piss about in them just like PDP/PSHE/Citizenship etc.
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    No, would just be a qualification for the sake of it (we have too many of those) and there is no sense in teaching fixed methods and examining it formally, as everybody thinks differently and views the world differently. Why not actually improve educational standards across the board and ensure that pupils and students are always thinking in that regard throughout the course of everything they are studying?

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    I went to a private school, and I seem to remember you saying you did as well. Would you want that rammed down your throats as a formal subject when the teachers are already encouraging you to use those very skills in your daily studies of other subjects? Hell, I wouldn't - we had enough work to do as it was.


    Let's turn the tables for a moment: if you were actually designing this course, what would you put on the syllabus, what coursework would you issue and how would you examine it? What marking criteria would you use in regards to this exam?
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    May as well watch all the 12 1-hour Harvard Justice lectures on Youtube
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    (Original post by ch0llima)
    No, would just be a qualification for the sake of it (we have too many of those) and there is no sense in teaching fixed methods and examining it formally, as everybody thinks differently and views the world differently. Why not actually improve educational standards across the board and ensure that pupils and students are always thinking in that regard throughout the course of everything they are studying?
    There doesn't necessarily have to be an exam for it, but it could potentially replace those frankly, godawful citizenship lessons in favour of something more mentally stimulating.

    [Critical thinking is an A level subject by the way, and whilst it certainly is present in other subjects, it is a standalone skill and qualification. It has helped me immensely with my studies and analysis of arguments.]
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    No, they don't necessarily understand the true implications of what they are learning in terms of the effect it could have on their other subjects.
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    The subject itself teaches you quite a lot of useful skills but exam structure is meh.
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    (Original post by kaosu_souzousha)
    The subject itself teaches you quite a lot of useful skills but exam structure is meh.
    Like i said before, perhaps it should just fill minority time and not be an examination?
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    I don't think many kids would take it seriously, they would just mess around in the lessons the same way they do in PHSE. You would be far better off giving that time to maths and science which promotes reasoning skills and gets taken more seriously.
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    (Original post by Ocassus)
    As the title says, should Critical thinking be a core [and therefore compulsory] subject at GCSE level? Personally, I feel it would be of great benefit to individuals doing the GCSE syllabus, because it promotes core reasoning skills which are beneficial across all other subjects, aswell as helping individuals identify key argument elements, dispute them, and construct their own arguments.

    Do you think it could potentially lead to a society where debate is more refined, and therefore more productive?

    Thoughts?
    YES!!! Totally.
    I think a lot of problems in this country could be solved if people just stopped and actually thought about a problem before making some rash half-assed judgement.
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    (Original post by Ocassus)
    As the title says, should Critical thinking be a core [and therefore compulsory] subject at GCSE level? Personally, I feel it would be of great benefit to individuals doing the GCSE syllabus, because it promotes core reasoning skills which are beneficial across all other subjects, aswell as helping individuals identify key argument elements, dispute them, and construct their own arguments.

    Do you think it could potentially lead to a society where debate is more refined, and therefore more productive?

    Thoughts?
    I've never acutally taken it before, so not really sure what it is tbh. Even though Maths and English are essential in life, I haven't acutally used any maths since I got out of school, well minus the minor calculations. I think it would be interesting if they did have it in school at some point. Not sure about a GCSE, but as something maybe. Definately if had practical elements like acutal arguements.
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    (Original post by Ocassus)
    As the title says, should Critical thinking be a core [and therefore compulsory] subject at GCSE level? Personally, I feel it would be of great benefit to individuals doing the GCSE syllabus, because it promotes core reasoning skills which are beneficial across all other subjects, aswell as helping individuals identify key argument elements, dispute them, and construct their own arguments.

    Do you think it could potentially lead to a society where debate is more refined, and therefore more productive?

    Thoughts?
    No. I think that you learn Critical thinking by learning about Science, History, Geography, English, Philosophy, Religion, etc..
    This is not something that you learn by reading a book or listening to a teacher that pretend to possess such a rare skill. In order to develop such a skill, you need to think critically about something. At GCSE level, kids nowadays don't know enough to be able to evaluate critically the facts or supposed facts presented to them.
 
 
 
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