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    I am a Japanese lawyer and currently studying in LLM, London.

    Now I am considering take QLTS to get solicitor qualification, because Japan has become the member of QLTS since this year. Japan is a civil law country.

    I applied for GDL of BPP and College of Law because I would like to study about UK legal system. But I'm not sure GDL is useful for taking QLTS test.

    Is the GDL good way to grasp whole picture of common law system? Is its curriculum far from knowledge necessary for QLTS? If it is not useful for QLTS, I will decline offer.

    Please also let me know if there is other appropriate programme for QLTS.
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    Hey Gotama,

    I don't actually know anything about this qualification, but I've looked it up quickly so maybe I or someone else can help.

    From what I understand, this is the Qualified Lawyers Transfer Scheme, for international lawyers who have qualified abroad and want to work in England & Wales as lawyers. Right?

    So if you've got your LLB (?) from Japan, and want to work in the England & Wales then this would benefit you. Are you fully qualified in Japan?

    For you, one way of doing things would be to study the GDL, I'm doing it at the moment and there's at least one international student, already a law graduate from another country but taking the GDL to essentially convert his degree to one that can be used in England & Wales.

    Still, the GDL is primarily for non-law graduates and although I suppose it could help from a personal background point of view, you already have a law degree, so you don't need to do both GDL and QLTS.

    Sorry for the lengthy reply, but basically I don't think you will benefit greatly from studying the GDL and as you are already a qualified lawyer ( I presume) then I feel the best route for you is to go forward rather than go back to studying more law!

    I see you applied to the College of Law. I'm doing the GDL there now (Manchester), and it is in my opinion a very good place to study. I don't know how other places are in comparison but we all generally enjoy it, though it does get tough.

    You already have the general qualifications you need, if your grades are decent then I would take a good break from full time education, at least for a while and get a job that will help further your law career.

    good luck.
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    (Original post by Gotama7)
    I am a Japanese lawyer and currently studying in LLM, London.

    Now I am considering take QLTS to get solicitor qualification, because Japan has become the member of QLTS since this year. Japan is a civil law country.

    I applied for GDL of BPP and College of Law because I would like to study about UK legal system. But I'm not sure GDL is useful for taking QLTS test.

    Is the GDL good way to grasp whole picture of common law system? Is its curriculum far from knowledge necessary for QLTS? If it is not useful for QLTS, I will decline offer.

    Please also let me know if there is other appropriate programme for QLTS.
    The course you should be doing is offered by CLT.

    They are specialists in continuing education for qualified lawyers.

    http://www.qltt.co.uk/Home

    See the reference to courses and distance learning down the left-hand side
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    (Original post by Gotama7)
    I am a Japanese lawyer and currently studying in LLM, London.

    Now I am considering take QLTS to get solicitor qualification, because Japan has become the member of QLTS since this year. Japan is a civil law country.

    I applied for GDL of BPP and College of Law because I would like to study about UK legal system. But I'm not sure GDL is useful for taking QLTS test.

    Is the GDL good way to grasp whole picture of common law system? Is its curriculum far from knowledge necessary for QLTS? If it is not useful for QLTS, I will decline offer.

    Please also let me know if there is other appropriate programme for QLTS.
    If you are fully qualified as a practicing lawyer in Japan you dont need to do any academic study.

    1. Get a certificate of good conduct from your home regulation body

    2. Apply to the SRA for QLTS certificate of eligibility and pay appropriate fee

    3. Register for and sit appropriate assessments with Kaplan who is the sole qlts provider (QLTT no longer exists unless you already registered so you cant do assessments with CLT, OXILP BPP etc unless you are under the previous transfer regulations which ended in 2010).

    4. Be admitted to the role of solicitors

    go to the SRA website for the infomation on the above.
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    (Original post by FMQ)
    If you are fully qualified as a practicing lawyer in Japan you dont need to do any academic study.

    1. Get a certificate of good conduct from your home regulation body

    2. Apply to the SRA for QLTS certificate of eligibility and pay appropriate fee

    3. Register for and sit appropriate assessments with Kaplan who is the sole qlts provider (QLTT no longer exists unless you already registered so you cant do assessments with CLT, OXILP BPP etc unless you are under the previous transfer regulations which ended in 2010)

    4. Be admitted to the role of solicitors

    go to the SRA website for the infomation on the above
    Sorry OP that one had passed me by.

    However it does like it is still CLT who are providing training for passing this new test.

    http://www.clt.co.uk/qlts
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    Hi, theyab

    Thank your for your answer. Yes, I'm already fully qualified japanese lawyer and considering getting solicitor.

    I understand I dont have to go to GDL, but I have no idea about UK legal system, so if I can learn something about it, I think it might be help me to grasp fundamental knowledge. That's why I applied for GDL programme.

    Are the knowledge necessary for QLTS and what I can learn from GDL totally different? If they are completely different, how can I study common law system for QLTS?

    if you know something, please let me know.

    Thanks.
    Gotama7

    ?.?. my grades are not decent...
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    Thanks!! I will check it out!
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    The course you should be doing is offered by CLT.

    They are specialists in continuing education for qualified lawyers.

    http://www.qltt.co.uk/Home

    See the reference to courses and distance learning down the left-hand side
    nulli tertius,

    Thanks!! I will check it out!!
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    GDL = toilet paper
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    (Original post by FMQ)
    If you are fully qualified as a practicing lawyer in Japan you dont need to do any academic study.

    1. Get a certificate of good conduct from your home regulation body

    2. Apply to the SRA for QLTS certificate of eligibility and pay appropriate fee

    3. Register for and sit appropriate assessments with Kaplan who is the sole qlts provider (QLTT no longer exists unless you already registered so you cant do assessments with CLT, OXILP BPP etc unless you are under the previous transfer regulations which ended in 2010).

    4. Be admitted to the role of solicitors

    go to the SRA website for the infomation on the above.
    Hi FMQ,

    Thank you for your advice.

    I have already checked SRA website, and know I don need GDL to become solicitor. However, as wrote above, I'm looking for the programme I can learn UK legal system basically for taking QLTS next year (2012). So I would like to confirm how beneficial its curriculum for preparation for QLTS, because i've never studied basic concept of common law.

    Thanks,
    Gotama7
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    (Original post by Gotama7)
    Hi FMQ,

    Thank you for your advice.

    I have already checked SRA website, and know I don need GDL to become solicitor. However, as wrote above, I'm looking for the programme I can learn UK legal system basically for taking QLTS next year (2012). So I would like to confirm how beneficial its curriculum for preparation for QLTS, because i've never studied basic concept of common law.

    Thanks,
    Gotama7
    You should speak to the SRA on this and how they recomend you prepare, they have a helpline/you can email them. GDL is academic and QLTR is practical so may be of little use.

    Former QLTT providers are trying to sell QLTS courses as they are losing money since scrapping of QLTT and now only Kaplan being a provider. The courses are new and may not be up to scratch given they dont know what will be in the assessments as its all very new - so make sure you check with SRA that any course you do is appropriate.
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    Hi Gotama San,

    I am also a student like you preparing for QLTS and hence I can understand what you are going through. My view is as under:

    1) Since you are from a civil law country and England being a common law, you may need academic training (though you are qualified in Japan) to start with. GDL/LLB books are available in any bookstore / amazon.

    2) But QLTS as you know is combination of GDL/LLB+LPC+practical aspects of law practice. With GDL/LLB, you can attempt MCQ but for for OSCE and TLST, you need knowledge of LPC. LPC books are also available to buy.

    3) But, If u think training from a proper school is appropriate to you (instead of self study like me), then either you can consider GDL+LPC (which is going to be a long affair) or tailored training such as what QLTS school is offereing.

    And by the way, I have launched a blog for students like you and me very recently. The blog address is http://qltsblog.blogspot.com. Check out. You may find some posts useful...
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    (Original post by FMQ)
    You should speak to the SRA on this and how they recomend you prepare, they have a helpline/you can email them. GDL is academic and QLTR is practical so may be of little use.

    Former QLTT providers are trying to sell QLTS courses as they are losing money since scrapping of QLTT and now only Kaplan being a provider. The courses are new and may not be up to scratch given they dont know what will be in the assessments as its all very new - so make sure you check with SRA that any course you do is appropriate.
    Thank you for useful advice, I talked with SRA staff, but they said they didnt know whether its appropriate or not. Anyway, I think about it for a while.
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    (Original post by qltstudent)
    Hi Gotama San,

    I am also a student like you preparing for QLTS and hence I can understand what you are going through. My view is as under:

    1) Since you are from a civil law country and England being a common law, you may need academic training (though you are qualified in Japan) to start with. GDL/LLB books are available in any bookstore / amazon.

    2) But QLTS as you know is combination of GDL/LLB+LPC+practical aspects of law practice. With GDL/LLB, you can attempt MCQ but for for OSCE and TLST, you need knowledge of LPC. LPC books are also available to buy.

    3) But, If u think training from a proper school is appropriate to you (instead of self study like me), then either you can consider GDL+LPC (which is going to be a long affair) or tailored training such as what QLTS school is offereing.

    And by the way, I have launched a blog for students like you and me very recently. The blog address is http://qltsblog.blogspot.com. Check out. You may find some posts useful...
    Hi QLTStudent,

    Thank you!! Im so happy to get contact with student who is preparing QLTS like you. Yes, Im afraid self-studying gonna be tough way for me. But I dont wanna go through GDL +LPC, because as you know it will be a long way and needs trainee for 2 years... So, I'm considering to learn basic concept of common law from GDL, and simultaneously, practical aspects from tailored material for QLTS as well. Does that make sense from your point view? I really would like you opinion about that. Additionally, if I go to GDL, I can get a student visa.

    Thank you too for your blog, will check it out.
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    I am a lawyer from China and I also want to prepare the QLST.
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    Hi Gotama7 San,

    Any legal study / training, whether self or taught, helps and to that extent GDL also helps. Whether it gives you worth the money that you are going to spend, only you can decide keeping in view other factors also such visa.

    Best of luck
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    This thread reminds me of Good Morning Vietnam: "Excuse me, sir. Seeing as how the V.P. is such a V.I.P., shouldn't we keep the P.C. on the Q.T.? 'Cause if it leaks to the V.C. he could end up M.I.A., and then we'd all be put out in K.P."
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    hahaha... that was a good one. point taken
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    I am a Brazilian lawyer lost as you were. So, what did you end up doing? Gdl?
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    (Original post by Bruna pcs)
    I am a Brazilian lawyer lost as you were. So, what did you end up doing? Gdl?
    This is a very old thread and is now closed.

    It's best to start a thread with your own question to get up to date replies

    Click this link: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/new...ewthread&f=263
 
 
 
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