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Rabbits... cages, neutering, and other questions! watch

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    Hi guys, I've been looking to adopt/buy a rabbit in the next month or so, so I'm just doing a bit of research before I do. I have a few questions so if anyone can answer I'd be super grateful!

    - What size hutch should I be looking for? The rabbit will be a house rabbit, so need to do all the necessary bunny-proofing stuff first, but my main concern at the minute is size of the hutch.
    - Also, what brand is best? I've heard Ferplast is pretty good?
    - I was considering getting a pair of rabbits - if I do, what sexes are best to put together?
    - Neutering: how much should I expect to pay? I'll be enquiring at the local vets but just wanted to get a general idea before I do.
    - Anything else I need to look out for? In general health etc...
    - And finally: where is best to buy them? I know you can buy them at petshops, Pets at Home etc... I don't know of any breeders here though. I'm just worried about buying at eg. a pet shop/Pets at Home and the rabbit[s] being ill, probably the same with breeders as well in case they're eg. inbred.

    I haven't had a rabbit for a while so I am still pretty inexperienced, so any help to get me on my way would be appreciated!
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    Look in your local paper, there's often rabbits available for not much or even 'free to good home' in the classified section. Sometimes they're from people who aren't able to care for their rabbits anymore, so you know you're doing a good deed as well :yep: Also see if there's any local animal rescue centres, they often have rabbits who need a new home.
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    (Original post by imomo16)
    Look in your local paper, there's often rabbits available for not much or even 'free to good home' in the classified section. Sometimes they're from people who aren't able to care for their rabbits anymore, so you know you're doing a good deed as well :yep: Also see if there's any local animal rescue centres, they often have rabbits who need a new home.
    Great, thanks I forgot about those! :tongue:
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    You can get a fairly averaged sized hutch (lounge and bedroom!) if it's two (which is better; they have a friend) then look for something bigger.

    You should definitely get the run too, which you can maneuver to the hutch so the little one(s) can run around on the grass and then hop into bed (make sure it is secure with bricks or something). Don't keep them locked up in the hutch all the time, it's unfair.

    I'm not sure what sexes you should put together, but if they've been neutered then I don't think there will be problems (I'm guessing here).

    Try and go to a rescue home, because they usually have neutered them for you. If not, depends on how much your local vet charges. It shouldn't be massively expensive.

    Health problems.

    Check their bums in case there is a lot of poo stuck to it. If there is, it's best to try and remove it (place them in warm shallow water and coax it off) because of the flys. Nasty disease. It may also get attached to their feet, so check they haven't been chewing at their feet to get it off. You may need to do the above to get it off.

    If a rabbit doesn't eat for 24 hours, you need to take them to the vet, as their organs may start to shut down. Also, check the ball in their water bottle doesn't break!

    Extra - buy some russell rabbit treats from sainsburys. My rabbit goes mad for them!

    I hope I've helped in some way. Rabbits are so lovely, enjoy!!
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    (Original post by inksplodge)
    - What size hutch should I be looking for? The rabbit will be a house rabbit, so need to do all the necessary bunny-proofing stuff first, but my main concern at the minute is size of the hutch.
    Honestly, as big as you can afford to go both monetary and space wise. This is going to be their home so if you can give them more space, give them more space. They need to be able to stand up on their back legs, and also be able to do some hopping and turning around in there.

    As you're intending them to be house bunnies they should (I imagine) be getting a lot of exercise so if you can't give them too much house space, make up for it in exercise.

    - Also, what brand is best? I've heard Ferplast is pretty good?
    They're pretty good! To be honest, a lot of the indoor ones are suitable. They don't have to withstand the elements, so that helps.

    http://www.petsathome.com/shop/rabbi...ferplast-15976

    Something like that would be ideal, though it isn't exactly cheap.

    - I was considering getting a pair of rabbits - if I do, what sexes are best to put together?
    Females do well together from the start. Males is a lot harder to do unless they are brothers, but even then you may find that they will fight, even if neutered.

    - Neutering: how much should I expect to pay? I'll be enquiring at the local vets but just wanted to get a general idea before I do.
    Depends where you live and what the vets charge. I live in quite a "nice" area, so the vets fees are through the roof compared to some places, simply because they can get away with it. Though anything from £40-60 would be my guess.

    - Anything else I need to look out for? In general health etc...
    When buying your bunny:
    • Bright Eyes
    • Clean Nose
    • Good Coat Condition
    • Active and alert
    • Also look at the ones kept with them - don't just judge the bunny/ies you want.


    When you have bunnies:
    • All the above.
    • Teeth condition - keep an eye out for overgrown/wonky teeth (you can ask to look at the teeth when buying, but this might be difficult!)
    • Keep an eye on their back-ends for matts (especially if you get a longer haired breed.)
    • Make sure that they're eating, drinking and getting rid of their waste.


    Bunnies are very good at hiding any illness they may have. The above list is the list of the obvious that come to mind. However, if you notice that your bunny is 'off' (something not quite right but you can't put your finger on it), go with your instinct and get them checked out by a vet, just to be on the safe side, especially if the off period lasts more than a few days!

    - And finally: where is best to buy them? I know you can buy them at petshops, Pets at Home etc... I don't know of any breeders here though. I'm just worried about buying at eg. a pet shop/Pets at Home and the rabbit[s] being ill, probably the same with breeders as well in case they're eg. inbred.
    At the end of the day it is totally up to you where you get them from. I'm not going to tell you not to get a pet-shop bunny because if there's one in there you really like, then by all means give the guy/girl a home! You could even look in Pets at Home Adoption Center? I know in my local there's often ready bonded pairs of bunnies you could offer a home.

    Or:
    Newspaper Ad
    RSPCA/Local Shelter
    Local/Independent Pet Shops (the ones round here tend to have well bred, or 'accidental' bunnies - We've had a few in the past and they've been perfect)


    I hope that helps, I may not have covered everything, but I've listed what comes to mind!
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    (Original post by ghostbusterbunny)
    Honestly, as big as you can afford to go both monetary and space wise. This is going to be their home so if you can give them more space, give them more space. They need to be able to stand up on their back legs, and also be able to do some hopping and turning around in there.

    As you're intending them to be house bunnies they should (I imagine) be getting a lot of exercise so if you can't give them too much house space, make up for it in exercise.



    They're pretty good! To be honest, a lot of the indoor ones are suitable. They don't have to withstand the elements, so that helps.

    http://www.petsathome.com/shop/rabbi...ferplast-15976

    Something like that would be ideal, though it isn't exactly cheap.



    Females do well together from the start. Males is a lot harder to do unless they are brothers, but even then you may find that they will fight, even if neutered.



    Depends where you live and what the vets charge. I live in quite a "nice" area, so the vets fees are through the roof compared to some places, simply because they can get away with it. Though anything from £40-60 would be my guess.





    When buying your bunny:
    • Bright Eyes
    • Clean Nose
    • Good Coat Condition
    • Active and alert
    • Also look at the ones kept with them - don't just judge the bunny/ies you want.


    When you have bunnies:
    • All the above.
    • Teeth condition - keep an eye out for overgrown/wonky teeth (you can ask to look at the teeth when buying, but this might be difficult!)
    • Keep an eye on their back-ends for matts (especially if you get a longer haired breed.)
    • Make sure that they're eating, drinking and getting rid of their waste.


    Bunnies are very good at hiding any illness they may have. The above list is the list of the obvious that come to mind. However, if you notice that your bunny is 'off' (something not quite right but you can't put your finger on it), go with your instinct and get them checked out by a vet, just to be on the safe side, especially if the off period lasts more than a few days!



    At the end of the day it is totally up to you where you get them from. I'm not going to tell you not to get a pet-shop bunny because if there's one in there you really like, then by all means give the guy/girl a home! You could even look in Pets at Home Adoption Center? I know in my local there's often ready bonded pairs of bunnies you could offer a home.

    Or:
    Newspaper Ad
    RSPCA/Local Shelter
    Local/Independent Pet Shops (the ones round here tend to have well bred, or 'accidental' bunnies - We've had a few in the past and they've been perfect)


    I hope that helps, I may not have covered everything, but I've listed what comes to mind!

    All of that except the cage tbh - my mum has her rabbit in there and while he gets let out in the house a lot isn't not big enough. The little house you can see isn't rabbit sized at all its more for guinea pigs. I'd recommend something like this

    http://www.petsathome.com/shop/daisy...-at-home-16030

    rabbit will have more space that's their own and also a bed type area that can be filled with straw. You can leave the bottom doors open to give him the run of the house if you want to or close them and he'll still have plenty of space.

    as for neutering - I've had three rabbits 2 boys and a girl and never had them 'done' they all live alone though rather than in pairs so i can't comment on what you should do if you go a pair - but f you just get one then I personally wouldn't have them neutered unless it's necessary.

    you should expect to pay about £20 for their myxo vac though which is a must, I was told by my vet that VHD was only required in certain areas and ours isn't one of them so double check with your vet about that
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    (Original post by ghostbusterbunny)
    Really good advice, thanks

    We've got a huge back garden so exercise won't be a problem, esp in the summer.

    I have seen the adoption bit at Pets at Home - I'm just worried in case they've been "trained" as outside rabbits rather than indoor ones? Would they still be easy enough to train as house rabbits?

    Also, would you say it was best to get one or two? Obviously if there's just one, it's going to have more space etc. But then I'm worried about it being lonely - they're supposed to be very social animals?

    (Original post by The_Goose)
    Thanks! At approx how old is the myxo vac recommended?
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    i had two rabbits and they were very much outdoor pets. so my first point to say is let them live outdoors. theyre outdoor animals, they like the fresh air and grass.
    if you want two rabbits then id go for two girls. i had two girls but they were sisters so they got on beautifully. if you cant get sisters then two girls will work. male animals can get aggressive at certain times of the year! =p if they were brothers im sure itd be fine though. i think if you had siblings the need for neuturing is lessened.
    obviously the bigger the hutch/cage the better. espec if the bunnies dont have a run. use your judgement. if you do keep them outdoors provide them with a decent sized run and if you want them outdoors still buy them a run. they need to exercise. the run i had was LARGE but i had the hutch inside of it. just give them enough space to have a run around if they fancy it. give them flower pots and old tubing to run through. if you keep them outside id recommend laying chicken mesh on the ground so they cant burrow out, like mine did. if not, when theyre in the run keep an eye on them. they will get out but also you dont want anything getting in. despite taking all the precautions one of my rabbits escaped and another got munched on by a fox. i had had them for nearly 10 yrs before that!
    i had my rabbits vaccinated for years before i stopped. they had viral haemorrhagic disease (vhd) and myxomotis innoculations as both are killers once caught. theyre expensive but necessary.
    i used sawdust, hay and straw in my animals home. they eat the hay but the straw is good bedding.
    my rabbits were offspring of a friends rabbits but id recommend going to a reputable pet shop. pets at home is probably absolutely fine, the animals in there look healthy and well cared for but if youre really not sure try a pet shop. ask around though!
    have fun (im jealous!)
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    (Original post by inksplodge)
    Hi guys, I've been looking to adopt/buy a rabbit in the next month or so, so I'm just doing a bit of research before I do. I have a few questions so if anyone can answer I'd be super grateful!

    - What size hutch should I be looking for? The rabbit will be a house rabbit, so need to do all the necessary bunny-proofing stuff first, but my main concern at the minute is size of the hutch.
    - Also, what brand is best? I've heard Ferplast is pretty good?
    - I was considering getting a pair of rabbits - if I do, what sexes are best to put together?
    - Neutering: how much should I expect to pay? I'll be enquiring at the local vets but just wanted to get a general idea before I do.
    - Anything else I need to look out for? In general health etc...
    - And finally: where is best to buy them? I know you can buy them at petshops, Pets at Home etc... I don't know of any breeders here though. I'm just worried about buying at eg. a pet shop/Pets at Home and the rabbit[s] being ill, probably the same with breeders as well in case they're eg. inbred.

    I haven't had a rabbit for a while so I am still pretty inexperienced, so any help to get me on my way would be appreciated!
    I got my 3 original rabbits from Pets at Home, and all 3 were in very good condition and were lovely little things We lost April to an infection within her brain, which obviously cannot be detected and is picked up at some point during life, and my bunny, Caramel. injured her back legs and struggled to move around, so I decided it was best to have her put to sleep. The third, Biscuit, is still with us at 5 years old and is the fattest, most spoilt bunny in the world my point is I don't think you'll have any issues with a Pets at Home bunny, if you cannot find another place to get some

    Bunnies are sociable animals and it's a nice idea to have a pair girls are often the best bet, as males fight, and mixed sex pairs will obviously try to have a family!! Spaying them will calm them down a lot, and the operation is very routine and relatively inexpensive (around £35 at my vet). Bear in mind, however, that if you decide on a pair you will need a much bigger hutch, particularly if they have not lived togather before, to make sure they can have their own space when they want to. If you decide on one, make sure it's given lots of love so it doesn't mind not having a companion

    Make sure you have them vaccinated for Myxo and VHD regularly (annually for VHD and every 6 months for Myxo) as it will prevent a lot of issues. If you live in a rural area (I assume your bunny will get some garden time? 75% of their diet should be grass!) it's a good idea to worm 3 to 4 times a year with Panacur paste - it's about £6.50 a tube and will doa full 9 day dosage. It's well worth it, as certain breeds are very susceptible to fatal ecuniculi infections, which it prevents.

    Hope this helps
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    (Original post by charli_dc1990)
    i had two rabbits and they were very much outdoor pets. so my first point to say is let them live outdoors. theyre outdoor animals, they like the fresh air and grass.
    if you want two rabbits then id go for two girls. i had two girls but they were sisters so they got on beautifully. if you cant get sisters then two girls will work. male animals can get aggressive at certain times of the year! =p if they were brothers im sure itd be fine though. i think if you had siblings the need for neuturing is lessened.
    obviously the bigger the hutch/cage the better. espec if the bunnies dont have a run. use your judgement. if you do keep them outdoors provide them with a decent sized run and if you want them outdoors still buy them a run. they need to exercise. the run i had was LARGE but i had the hutch inside of it. just give them enough space to have a run around if they fancy it. give them flower pots and old tubing to run through. if you keep them outside id recommend laying chicken mesh on the ground so they cant burrow out, like mine did. if not, when theyre in the run keep an eye on them. they will get out but also you dont want anything getting in. despite taking all the precautions one of my rabbits escaped and another got munched on by a fox. i had had them for nearly 10 yrs before that!
    i had my rabbits vaccinated for years before i stopped. they had viral haemorrhagic disease (vhd) and myxomotis innoculations as both are killers once caught. theyre expensive but necessary.
    i used sawdust, hay and straw in my animals home. they eat the hay but the straw is good bedding.
    my rabbits were offspring of a friends rabbits but id recommend going to a reputable pet shop. pets at home is probably absolutely fine, the animals in there look healthy and well cared for but if youre really not sure try a pet shop. ask around though!
    have fun (im jealous!)
    thank you

    i had a rabbit when i was much younger and she lived outside, she just seemed a lot more vicious. i'm more drawn to house rabbits because of their [supposed] better nature etc. my aunt's actually just got a lovely baby and he has house trained really well.

    my dad did actually build a hutch in our shed with plenty of room but i'm just not sure i want to keep it outside where i can't keep an eye on it all the time :/

    yes, i am actually considering adopting from pets at home now... but will ring up to enquire ages, gender, etc. first
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    (Original post by inksplodge)
    thank you

    i had a rabbit when i was much younger and she lived outside, she just seemed a lot more vicious. i'm more drawn to house rabbits because of their [supposed] better nature etc. my aunt's actually just got a lovely baby and he has house trained really well.

    my dad did actually build a hutch in our shed with plenty of room but i'm just not sure i want to keep it outside where i can't keep an eye on it all the time :/

    yes, i am actually considering adopting from pets at home now... but will ring up to enquire ages, gender, etc. first

    You can get an outdoor hutch and keep it inside though. That's what my mum is planning to do now - they just don't make the plastic indoor one's big enough! But the two tier ones are good because they take up less floor space but bunny has more living room that's his.

    Rabbit are usually only vicious if they aren't handled enough - I've never had a bad natured rabbit
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    (Original post by inksplodge)
    I have seen the adoption bit at Pets at Home - I'm just worried in case they've been "trained" as outside rabbits rather than indoor ones? Would they still be easy enough to train as house rabbits?

    Also, would you say it was best to get one or two? Obviously if there's just one, it's going to have more space etc. But then I'm worried about it being lonely - they're supposed to be very social animals?
    Ah, good point about the adoptions bit. Rabbits are fairly easy to litter train though, no matter what age they are, they'll pick it up. You can always see if there are some younger ones. Some of the ones in [email protected] have never had a home before (if they've been taken off shop floor or brought in from an affiliated shelter, for example) so they may never have seen a garden! It's worth a look, mine usually has 2-3 sets of or single rabbits each with their own background.

    I'd say two. I'm a bit of a hypocrite in the sense that I had single rabbits until one of my girls finally accepted her sister back. Unfortunately her sister has since died and she's back on her own, but looking at her when they were together they were so much happier and you see behaviours (sleeping on each other, grooming each other, following each other etc) that you just wouldn't see with a single. They're definitely happier when paired up!

    @Goose, fair point about the cage, but not a lot of people have space for a big hutch in their house. For rabbits you can take the hidey home out - they're meant for pigs not rabbits in the first place.

    The cage will be suitable if you have two smaller breeds and if they have a room or somewhere they can spend most of the day. If you can get a hutch indoors though, Ink, then a hutch would work. The only thing I'd say with a hutch indoors is prepare for mess. Cages are better at keeping sawdust mess in.
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    (Original post by The_Goose)
    You can get an outdoor hutch and keep it inside though. That's what my mum is planning to do now - they just don't make the plastic indoor one's big enough! But the two tier ones are good because they take up less floor space but bunny has more living room that's his.

    Rabbit are usually only vicious if they aren't handled enough - I've never had a bad natured rabbit
    ah she hated being handled. i don't know if it was because the petshop we got her from didn't handle her enough or something!

    the hutch outside is actually really big. it had three parts- two 'rooms' that sat on top of each other, the top had mesh with foodbowl and water (although there was a water bottle on the bottom, too) and ramp down into the main bit, which then led into a room with plenty of straw where she could sleep. the front lifted up so you could clean it and the sleeping room had a door to open too. i disliked it however as the shed had many spiders in it and urgh, one day there was a massive thing in there >_< the plus point was that it was high up and if some how a cat or something got in, it couldnt quite reach/she had somewhere to hide if it did. the door was normally shut though.

    now im thinking about it it was a pretty good hutch. lol. the only drawback was a. the rabbit didnt like being handled and b. i couldnt keep an eye on her all the time esp if the door was shut.
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    (Original post by inksplodge)
    ah she hated being handled. i don't know if it was because the petshop we got her from didn't handle her enough or something!

    the hutch outside is actually really big. it had three parts- two 'rooms' that sat on top of each other, the top had mesh with foodbowl and water (although there was a water bottle on the bottom, too) and ramp down into the main bit, which then led into a room with plenty of straw where she could sleep. the front lifted up so you could clean it and the sleeping room had a door to open too. i disliked it however as the shed had many spiders in it and urgh, one day there was a massive thing in there >_< the plus point was that it was high up and if some how a cat or something got in, it couldnt quite reach/she had somewhere to hide if it did. the door was normally shut though.

    now im thinking about it it was a pretty good hutch. lol. the only drawback was a. the rabbit didnt like being handled and b. i couldnt keep an eye on her all the time esp if the door was shut.
    No way that it would be moved indoors?
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    (Original post by broadwayrachael)
    I got my 3 original rabbits from Pets at Home, and all 3 were in very good condition and were lovely little things We lost April to an infection within her brain, which obviously cannot be detected and is picked up at some point during life, and my bunny, Caramel. injured her back legs and struggled to move around, so I decided it was best to have her put to sleep. The third, Biscuit, is still with us at 5 years old and is the fattest, most spoilt bunny in the world my point is I don't think you'll have any issues with a Pets at Home bunny, if you cannot find another place to get some

    Bunnies are sociable animals and it's a nice idea to have a pair girls are often the best bet, as males fight, and mixed sex pairs will obviously try to have a family!! Spaying them will calm them down a lot, and the operation is very routine and relatively inexpensive (around £35 at my vet). Bear in mind, however, that if you decide on a pair you will need a much bigger hutch, particularly if they have not lived togather before, to make sure they can have their own space when they want to. If you decide on one, make sure it's given lots of love so it doesn't mind not having a companion

    Make sure you have them vaccinated for Myxo and VHD regularly (annually for VHD and every 6 months for Myxo) as it will prevent a lot of issues. If you live in a rural area (I assume your bunny will get some garden time? 75% of their diet should be grass!) it's a good idea to worm 3 to 4 times a year with Panacur paste - it's about £6.50 a tube and will doa full 9 day dosage. It's well worth it, as certain breeds are very susceptible to fatal ecuniculi infections, which it prevents.

    Hope this helps
    aww thanks, good to know! I sometimes go in to see the rabbits and they seem fairly healthy but there's one or two that don't seem right in that they don't move around a lot or anything. However the majority seem happy, bouncy and generally very socialable

    bunny[or bunnies] will have plenty of garden time! it's not getting a lot of use. we had a dog but lost her 9 weeks ago and it seems a shame to have such a big garden and no pets out there to enjoy it. didn't think about worming - thanks!
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    I would always say neuter your rabbit no matter what sex it is or where it'll lives mainly because neutering stops the rabbit from being hormonal aggressive which most rabbits can suffer from causing them to become ignored or rehomed because they bite, scratch and act unsociable, it also makes it able for them to live with other rabbits and as social animals they need other rabbits for company, especailly if they will live outside as most people will only spend a few hours a day with them in the summer and less in the winter and lastly for females it stops phantom pregnances and cancer in the womb and for males it stops humping and spraying.

    Outdoors you should have at least a 6 foot hutch for two rabbits and a run - the bigger the better. Indoors would be again bigger the better, but make sure you have a secure area as they chew everything. I would recommened getting a two tier cage as then you can have more space in a smaller area.

    I have two indoor rabbits I prefer them to be indoors in the winter because most rabbits die young living outside as they are exposed to the elements and cleaning out a hutch in the cold/wet/wind is horrid. They also get more attention from you indoors.

    Rabbits do love it outside, but I find they're happier when given a lot of space to run around or else they're just sitting because they can only hop because their run isn't much bigger then the hutch they live in.

    Be warned if you get two rabbits of the same sex - there is a high chance they can be missex and rabbits breed really young and plentiful. If you go for two females they still need to be neutered because they will fight as their hormones will make them bicker for nesting space - once they fight you can't keep them together even if neutered afterwards. Then tend to become hormonal around 6-8 months, sooner for small breeds and later for large breeds.

    Two males will fight when they get to about 12 weeks, but you can get them neutered at that age too, but you need to ask vets as some will only do it at 6 months of age.

    If you go to a rescue they tend to have already neutered and vaccinated pairs. This does bring down the cost and you find out what the rabbits personality is. Don't be fooled that baby rabbits are better because with adults you've just missed the whole teenage strops and bickering, plus they only stay 'cute' for about 2-3 weeks before they look adult. I don't find they bond better then adults, usually adult rabbits have been handled quite a bit before you get them. One of my rabbits was handled all the time in the rescue and by me carrying it on, she's very easy and still when picked up, while rabbits not handled or used to it will kick and struggle.

    Adults can be taught to get used to handling, my second rescued rabbit hated being handled, but because I handled him twice a day and held him until he calmed down, he now sits still when picked up. Both were over 1 year old.

    I always find a male and female pair is best (after neutering of course!) you could get one and get it neutered ect then get another, the downside with this is that rabbits are very territorial so you will need space to introduce the two carefully to avoid a bad fight, but some rabbits have moved in together without as much as a hump.

    The prices would depend on your vets, in Peterborough it's about £60, but I've heard it costing more in other places.

    Just make sure they have good quality hay at all times (and not the cheap stuff, no rabbit eats that) and watch their weight as indoor buns tend to get fat easily which can cause fly strike in the summer as they can't keep themselves clean.

    Any rabbit can be trained to be house rabbits no matter where they've lived or how old they are.

    Most importanly, don't rush into it!
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    Protip: Don't feed them holly leaves because they will rip the hell out of it's stomach.

    My little brother didn't know the difference & thought he was being helpful feeding our rabbit when we were kids.

    I miss that rabbit
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    (Original post by The_Goose)
    No way that it would be moved indoors?
    nope, it's fixed to the wall! :tongue:

    (Original post by ghostbusterbunny)
    Ah, good point about the adoptions bit. Rabbits are fairly easy to litter train though, no matter what age they are, they'll pick it up. You can always see if there are some younger ones. Some of the ones in [email protected] have never had a home before (if they've been taken off shop floor or brought in from an affiliated shelter, for example) so they may never have seen a garden! It's worth a look, mine usually has 2-3 sets of or single rabbits each with their own background.

    I'd say two. I'm a bit of a hypocrite in the sense that I had single rabbits until one of my girls finally accepted her sister back. Unfortunately her sister has since died and she's back on her own, but looking at her when they were together they were so much happier and you see behaviours (sleeping on each other, grooming each other, following each other etc) that you just wouldn't see with a single. They're definitely happier when paired up!

    @Goose, fair point about the cage, but not a lot of people have space for a big hutch in their house. For rabbits you can take the hidey home out - they're meant for pigs not rabbits in the first place.

    The cage will be suitable if you have two smaller breeds and if they have a room or somewhere they can spend most of the day. If you can get a hutch indoors though, Ink, then a hutch would work. The only thing I'd say with a hutch indoors is prepare for mess. Cages are better at keeping sawdust mess in.
    mm, i didn't want the poor rabbits to be lonely but then again i figure they'll be getting a lot of attention anyway. if i can adopt a pair then i think i'll do that, but if i have to buy then probably just one.
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    (Original post by Mutedmirth)

    Thanks! Some really good advice there. The prices bit helps as I'm not that far from Peterborough :tongue: I'm not so worried about getting a rabbit that is a bit older now
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    (Original post by inksplodge)
    mm, i didn't want the poor rabbits to be lonely but then again i figure they'll be getting a lot of attention anyway. if i can adopt a pair then i think i'll do that, but if i have to buy then probably just one.
    If you buy from [email protected] you can get two for £35 or £40 I think. If you do buy, see if you can get an 'offer' (for some reason I hate calling it an offer when it comes to pets), I know independent pet shops will also give you a saving if you buy more than one. Trust me, you won't regret it if you buy two. You'll get so much more from watching them doing what bunnies do and they'll be happier too!
 
 
 
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