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Rabbits... cages, neutering, and other questions! watch

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    (Original post by ghostbusterbunny)
    If you buy from [email protected] you can get two for £35 or £40 I think. If you do buy, see if you can get an 'offer' (for some reason I hate calling it an offer when it comes to pets), I know independent pet shops will also give you a saving if you buy more than one. Trust me, you won't regret it if you buy two. You'll get so much more from watching them doing what bunnies do and they'll be happier too!
    Yep, its £28 for one or £35 for two. I know it seems like "oh it'd be better to get two" but then I've got to think about the costs of hutches, of vaccinating them etc and it feels like it'd be better to just get one, but then I'm like ah but I should really get two so they have company >_< ! Decisions! Of course it wouldn't matter if I adopt as ones up for adoption are free.
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    (Original post by inksplodge)
    Thanks! Some really good advice there. The prices bit helps as I'm not that far from Peterborough :tongue: I'm not so worried about getting a rabbit that is a bit older now
    There are loads of rabbits in rescues, have a look in Wood Green Animal Shelter in Godmanchester, they have pairs of rabbits all neutered, health checked and vaccinated at different ages looking for homes, uh it was £60 10 years ago for mine, not sure if the price is still the same, but if you work it out in the first year if you bought your rabbit it would cost around £20-30 for one rabbit (little more if they're on offer for two and depends where you get them) £60 for neutering per rabbit and £20 for each vaccination per rabbit. So two vacs this year and neutering for one rabbit would be £100. This doesn't include buying cage/bedding/food ect. (check out online ads and newspapers for cheaper deals of cages)

    Please even if you start out with one rabbit, get another to keep it company eventually, I started out with one rabbit and a year later got another. I currently have a bonded pair and because of their interactions with each other I'll never keep a rabbit alone again. They're just obviously much happier.

    Also there's the Blue Cross in Cambridge, I'm not sure if they still have rabbits there but they did when I got mine 8 years ago and as already said the adoption section of [email protected], although it's rare for them to get neutered or vaccinated rabbits in.

    You should look into insurance for rabbits too, I've got both of mine covered and now they're old they have resportory infection, one will defiantly have it for life so will be on treatment, the other might have to be on treatment for life.

    They also live longer then people think, mine are currently 8 and 10 years old, so be confident you can keep them for the whole of their lives.

    Also have a look at rabbit breeds and decide what size you want and have the room for. I have Dutch, which are a small breed and easy to pick up and handle, dwarfs are smaller, but more active and lops are much bigger but generally more laid back, then there's the giant breeds which are the size of small dogs.

    This is also why adults are good because you can see them fully grown and decide rather then buying a lop that 'won't get much bigger' then turns into a 5kg monster of a rabbit.
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    (Original post by Mutedmirth)
    There are loads of rabbits in rescues, have a look in Wood Green Animal Shelter in Godmanchester, they have pairs of rabbits all neutered, health checked and vaccinated at different ages looking for homes, uh it was £60 10 years ago for mine, not sure if the price is still the same, but if you work it out in the first year if you bought your rabbit it would cost around £20-30 for one rabbit (little more if they're on offer for two and depends where you get them) £60 for neutering per rabbit and £20 for each vaccination per rabbit. So two vacs this year and neutering for one rabbit would be £100. This doesn't include buying cage/bedding/food ect. (check out online ads and newspapers for cheaper deals of cages)

    Please even if you start out with one rabbit, get another to keep it company eventually, I started out with one rabbit and a year later got another. I currently have a bonded pair and because of their interactions with each other I'll never keep a rabbit alone again. They're just obviously much happier.

    Also there's the Blue Cross in Cambridge, I'm not sure if they still have rabbits there but they did when I got mine 8 years ago and as already said the adoption section of [email protected], although it's rare for them to get neutered or vaccinated rabbits in.

    You should look into insurance for rabbits too, I've got both of mine covered and now they're old they have resportory infection, one will defiantly have it for life so will be on treatment, the other might have to be on treatment for life.

    They also live longer then people think, mine are currently 8 and 10 years old, so be confident you can keep them for the whole of their lives.

    Also have a look at rabbit breeds and decide what size you want and have the room for. I have Dutch, which are a small breed and easy to pick up and handle, dwarfs are smaller, but more active and lops are much bigger but generally more laid back, then there's the giant breeds which are the size of small dogs.

    This is also why adults are good because you can see them fully grown and decide rather then buying a lop that 'won't get much bigger' then turns into a 5kg monster of a rabbit.
    Ha very good point! I do want a small breed - our old one was a lop and she was quite big.

    Insurance is something I was definitely looking into, not sure where I'd get it from but I'd definitely have it.
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    Whatever you do, absolutely ALWAYS, ALWAYS make sure they are up to date with vaccinations and worming.
    I live in quite a "rough" sort of area and alot of people have rabbits and don't really consider the vet fees or just think rabbits don't really need to be vaccinated against things, and some diseases rabbits are susceptible to are pretty much always fatal.
    Rabbits are pretty small really, and if they have worms they can lose weight quite quickly and then again, it doesn't take much to die. Prevention is better than trying to treat it after.
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    (Original post by juliewho)
    Whatever you do, absolutely ALWAYS, ALWAYS make sure they are up to date with vaccinations and worming.
    I live in quite a "rough" sort of area and alot of people have rabbits and don't really consider the vet fees or just think rabbits don't really need to be vaccinated against things, and some diseases rabbits are susceptible to are pretty much always fatal.
    Rabbits are pretty small really, and if they have worms they can lose weight quite quickly and then again, it doesn't take much to die. Prevention is better than trying to treat it after.
    thank you yeah it is the same here.
    our neighbours rabbit was put to sleep, erm, there was something wrong with its ears i think, so it was very lopsided... really sad
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    (Original post by inksplodge)
    thank you yeah it is the same here.
    our neighbours rabbit was put to sleep, erm, there was something wrong with its ears i think, so it was very lopsided... really sad
    The rabbit next door to us contracted something and died within three days. We were convinced it was myxomatosis because it had really bad conjunctivitis and went blind, but they never bothered to get it checked out because it was "only a rabbit"
    It makes me sick when I see irresponsible owners, they put other peoples pets at risk too, even though they are "only rabbits" they deserve proper care and attention.
    *rant over* Oh, and if you get two, get two females. We made the mistake of getting two males from the same litter, don't believe pet shops when they say they don't fight
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    (Original post by juliewho)
    The rabbit next door to us contracted something and died within three days. We were convinced it was myxomatosis because it had really bad conjunctivitis and went blind, but they never bothered to get it checked out because it was "only a rabbit"
    It makes me sick when I see irresponsible owners, they put other peoples pets at risk too, even though they are "only rabbits" they deserve proper care and attention.
    *rant over* Oh, and if you get two, get two females. We made the mistake of getting two males from the same litter, don't believe pet shops when they say they don't fight
    ha! okay
    yeah that is absolutely true. it's really contagious isn't it? if they have something they could easily pass iton.
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    (Original post by Mutedmirth)
    This is also why adults are good because you can see them fully grown and decide rather then buying a lop that 'won't get much bigger' then turns into a 5kg monster of a rabbit.
    Haha, that is a very good point. We bought a 'mini' lop when I was younger. Told it would get to 2-3kg when fully grown. We ended up with a 5.5kilo beast of a bunny.

    Luckily we had the space for her then...
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    One male and one female tend to get on well I would reccommend getting a pair, they love having company. In terms of the cost of neutering, it cost us £45 for a boy and £55 for a girl I believe, but that was several years ago; so probably more now.
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    (Original post by inksplodge)
    Yep, its £28 for one or £35 for two. I know it seems like "oh it'd be better to get two" but then I've got to think about the costs of hutches, of vaccinating them etc and it feels like it'd be better to just get one, but then I'm like ah but I should really get two so they have company >_< ! Decisions! Of course it wouldn't matter if I adopt as ones up for adoption are free.

    You usually have to give a donation. At pets at home they normally ask you for about half of what it costs to buy so to adopt two would still probably cost you £20.

    If you adopt them from shelters they usually ask for quite a bit more, especially if they're vaccinated already

    e.g. http://www.rabbitrehome.org.uk/rescue.asp?Rescue=101

    rehoming fee £65 for a doe! no wonder people buy new baby ones. I certainly wouldn't pay that!

    They come and do a home visit (which is good I suppose but hassle and only makes you want to just go buy one even more)
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    (Original post by inksplodge)
    Ha very good point! I do want a small breed - our old one was a lop and she was quite big.

    Insurance is something I was definitely looking into, not sure where I'd get it from but I'd definitely have it.
    I've never had insurance for my rabbits. It doesn't cover vaccinations and they're generally all they need. If it needed something I'd pay for it, but chances are that any treatment that was going to cost hundred and hundred of pounds I wouldn't put a rabbit through it. I think you can love them too much sometimes, and it's a bit cruel to put them through it.

    Miffy got really horrible urine scald (we have no idea how, neither did the vet) but when the vet washed her a lot of her skin fell off and she was just raw round her back end. Vet said she could try to treat it, but it was obvious Miffy was in alot of pain and distressed, so I did the kindest thing =(
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    (Original post by The_Goose)
    I've never had insurance for my rabbits. It doesn't cover vaccinations and they're generally all they need. If it needed something I'd pay for it, but chances are that any treatment that was going to cost hundred and hundred of pounds I wouldn't put a rabbit through it. I think you can love them too much sometimes, and it's a bit cruel to put them through it.

    Miffy got really horrible urine scald (we have no idea how, neither did the vet) but when the vet washed her a lot of her skin fell off and she was just raw round her back end. Vet said she could try to treat it, but it was obvious Miffy was in alot of pain and distressed, so I did the kindest thing =(
    aww yeah i see what you mean. our dog had to have a life saving operation that cost about £500 but she got another 7 years life from it so in that respect it was well worth the money :yep:

    as for the adopting thing, yeah. i would definitely pay something! i have had a local breeder contact me that they will have some baby rex rabbits available at the end of may which would give me plenty of time to get things ready. however my understanding is that rex rabbits are quite big?
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    (Original post by inksplodge)
    aww yeah i see what you mean. our dog had to have a life saving operation that cost about £500 but she got another 7 years life from it so in that respect it was well worth the money :yep:

    as for the adopting thing, yeah. i would definitely pay something! i have had a local breeder contact me that they will have some baby rex rabbits available at the end of may which would give me plenty of time to get things ready. however my understanding is that rex rabbits are quite big?
    rex rabbits make fantastic pets! My mum loves them =)

    Dogs are a bit different - they can withstand alot more. My Dogs had two hip replacements costing over £10k but it was traumatising for her like something similar would be for a rabbit.
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    (Original post by The_Goose)
    rex rabbits make fantastic pets! My mum loves them =)

    Dogs are a bit different - they can withstand alot more. My Dogs had two hip replacements costing over £10k but it was traumatising for her like something similar would be for a rabbit.
    oh thanks

    yeah, i guess its cos theyre bigger etc.
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    (Original post by inksplodge)
    oh thanks

    yeah, i guess its cos theyre bigger etc.

    it shouldn't make too much difference as you were planning to have a house rabbit
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    (Original post by inksplodge)
    Hi guys, I've been looking to adopt/buy a rabbit in the next month or so, so I'm just doing a bit of research before I do. I have a few questions so if anyone can answer I'd be super grateful!

    - What size hutch should I be looking for? The rabbit will be a house rabbit, so need to do all the necessary bunny-proofing stuff first, but my main concern at the minute is size of the hutch.
    - Also, what brand is best? I've heard Ferplast is pretty good?
    - I was considering getting a pair of rabbits - if I do, what sexes are best to put together?
    - Neutering: how much should I expect to pay? I'll be enquiring at the local vets but just wanted to get a general idea before I do.
    - Anything else I need to look out for? In general health etc...
    - And finally: where is best to buy them? I know you can buy them at petshops, Pets at Home etc... I don't know of any breeders here though. I'm just worried about buying at eg. a pet shop/Pets at Home and the rabbit[s] being ill, probably the same with breeders as well in case they're eg. inbred.

    I haven't had a rabbit for a while so I am still pretty inexperienced, so any help to get me on my way would be appreciated!
    * The best thing to do would be to get as big a hutch as you can manage
    * I don't go for specific brands, just what works best Though yep, Ferplast are pretty
    good - I'm pretty sure my Rabbit has a Ferplast indoor hutch
    * I would ask a Vet about the best way to pair Rabbits - I have heard that males are
    less hassle together, though if females were spayed then I dont think it'd be so much
    of an issue. I did have a castrated male and female but the female was a little Dwarf
    Rabbit and always bullied the huge (who we assume was half Hare) male, so They
    lived separately after the first day Best thing to do if you want a pair is to adopt
    siblings or get a pair from a Rescue Centre - some Pet Shops do re homing schemes -
    that's how I got my Rabbit
    * It's best to ask your Vet about neutering prices
    * Check Rabbit is bright and alert, has a shiny coat (as that indicates good health) and
    bright eyes The Rabbit should be active and friendly, and should be eating/drinking
    /playing/interacting with other Rabbits happily Also it's best to keep an eye out for
    ear mites/scratching etc, though your Vet can better advise you on things like that
    * As long as the area the Rabbits are kept in is clean and tidy, and the Rabbits are all
    happy/healthy - I dont think it'd be too much of an issue where you get your Rabbit
    from Mine, for example, had been put up for re-homing in a local Pets @ Home
    store, and had been there for 6 months because nobody wanted Him as the card said
    He was agressive/bites. Turns out He's the most cuddly, daft Rabbit you could ever
    wish to meet!! He doesnt like being outside (even though we make Him spend time
    out on the grass ) and His fave thing to do is watch telly on the sofa with a
    biscuit!! lol. I've had Rabbits from breeders and They've all been fine - likewise,
    I've had Rabbits from Pet Shops who've been fine, so I guess it's just a case of being
    careful

    Anyways, all the best!! Hope you find fab Rabbits!! Please let us know when you get Them
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    (Original post by inksplodge)
    aww yeah i see what you mean. our dog had to have a life saving operation that cost about £500 but she got another 7 years life from it so in that respect it was well worth the money :yep:

    as for the adopting thing, yeah. i would definitely pay something! i have had a local breeder contact me that they will have some baby rex rabbits available at the end of may which would give me plenty of time to get things ready. however my understanding is that rex rabbits are quite big?
    Rexes have the best fur but yes rex rabbits are big, but more hare like then fat lop like. Mini rexes are smaller, I would ask if you can visit to see adult rex rabbits to gauge how big they will get.

    I love dutch rabbits myself as they are small and compact which means they are well easy to pick up and hold. Bigger, leggy rabbits are a lot more harder to handle, so it's important to handle them every day at a young age so they get used to it. Trust me, you don't want to be scratched and kicked to pieces by a large rabbit, they have powerful back legs. *has been kicked and scratched by rex rabbits, giant rabbits, nethies, lops, Englishies, dutch ect.* The bigger ones are the worse. Though generally rabbits don't like being handled at all anyway, but at least if you condition them to sit still in your arms when you need to it makes life so much easier.
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    (Original post by The_Goose)
    I've never had insurance for my rabbits. It doesn't cover vaccinations and they're generally all they need. If it needed something I'd pay for it, but chances are that any treatment that was going to cost hundred and hundred of pounds I wouldn't put a rabbit through it. I think you can love them too much sometimes, and it's a bit cruel to put them through it.

    Miffy got really horrible urine scald (we have no idea how, neither did the vet) but when the vet washed her a lot of her skin fell off and she was just raw round her back end. Vet said she could try to treat it, but it was obvious Miffy was in alot of pain and distressed, so I did the kindest thing =(
    There are times for animals when the treatment would be too much for them. However I like to give them a chance, one of my rabbits is suffering from liquid on the lungs, I did consider pts as she lost weight, not ate much and not acted like herself, but wanted to try treatment first. She will be on treatment for the rest of her life (she's 10 years old) but she is back to her old self and it means her boyfriend isn't on his own and he has a snotty nose which again means long term treatment and depending what it is, might be life - it doesn't affect him at all, but left could become something much worse. If at one point the treatment stops working I will let her go, but mainly she's survived the worse of it because she kept fighting.

    Rabbits can handle more then people think.
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    (Original post by Mutedmirth)
    There are times for animals when the treatment would be too much for them. However I like to give them a chance, one of my rabbits is suffering from liquid on the lungs, I did consider pts as she lost weight, not ate much and not acted like herself, but wanted to try treatment first. She will be on treatment for the rest of her life (she's 10 years old) but she is back to her old self and it means her boyfriend isn't on his own and he has a snotty nose which again means long term treatment and depending what it is, might be life - it doesn't affect him at all, but left could become something much worse. If at one point the treatment stops working I will let her go, but mainly she's survived the worse of it because she kept fighting.

    Rabbits can handle more then people think.


    I know what you mean. I'm not saying if my rabbit got the snuffles I'd have him put to sleep. But if he needed something massive involving operations, long recovery periods, low chances of survival and pain for him then I wouldn't put him through it.

    I've had 3 rabbits in 14 years and only one of them has needed medication/ treatment from vets that would have been covered on insurance and that cost £60. If I'd paid £7 per month or whatever rabbit insurance is these days thats £1176.

    Maybe I've been lucky so far and I'll regret not insuring them but at the minute with the money I've saved on not paying insurance will easily pay for any treatment for my babbit =)
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    Not sure if it has already been mentioned but if you get a bun I would join "Rabbit United Forum"
 
 
 
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