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PE is a subject for animals taught by animals watch

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    All my female P.E teachers were quite large. The only athletic ones were the men.
    One group of girls refused to do P.E and called the teachers hypocrites. One teacher was so embarrassed about her size that she let them sit out every lesson...

    I enjoyed it though, nobody took it too seriously.
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    (Original post by Lizia)
    LOL. You really do have an over idealised idea of PE teaching in most schools. I know girls with asthma who weren't cut any slack when it came to cross country. And those who slipped and twisted their ankle in front of the teacher who were made to carry on, and shouted at if they slowed down. Then there was a girl who was hit in the head with a netball and not allowed to sit out, who ended up in hospital diagnosed with a concussion. Most PE teachers don't give a damn about your medical problems unless it's something that literally means you cannot move, or it's an acceptably dramatic injury like a broken leg.
    I found that in PE my asthma was actually taken seriously - if I ever asked to get my inhaler they would be very understanding. I sometimes did it just to get away for five minutes! It was woodwork where I had the problem - I once asked to get my inhaler because I felt really ill because of all the dust. My teacher said he "didn't think it would help" and I wasn't allowed to get it from my locker. I ended up having an asthma attack and spending the weekend in hospital.
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    (Original post by Lizia)
    LOL. You really do have an over idealised idea of PE teaching in most schools. I know girls with asthma who weren't cut any slack when it came to cross country. And those who slipped and twisted their ankle in front of the teacher who were made to carry on, and shouted at if they slowed down. Then there was a girl who was hit in the head with a netball and not allowed to sit out, who ended up in hospital diagnosed with a concussion. Most PE teachers don't give a damn about your medical problems unless it's something that literally means you cannot move, or it's an acceptably dramatic injury like a broken leg.
    Ive never known one single PE teacher like that and I think you're lying tbh.
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    Chin up
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    (Original post by Josh_Dey)
    Your school is ****ed.
    If any P.E teacher told me I got a detention for not completing cross country fast enough I would tell him to do one. Don't accept that.
    Wow you clearly went to an unusually nice school then! 4 years of being forced to play rugby, in the snow/rain/on frozen pitches for 2/3rds of the school year every single week has certainly put me off ever playing the damn sport again...I don't think this is actually that uncommon either, from what people are saying on here (especially at more traditional schools, like my all-boys grammar) the 'PE teachers are gods and can do whatever they like' seems to be pretty normal!

    A few years back at my school, I remember there was a big controversy because our head of PE put one of the 1st XV Rugby into saturday detention for the rest of the year because he refused to commit to playing every week - in the school rules it actually says 'if you are selected to compete in a school sports team, you are expected to attend all relevant training sessions and matches'. Well, that was before he got sacked last month before getting into a bar fight and breaking a student's nose after the rugby christmas party....
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    (Original post by Left Hand Drive)
    Ive never known one single PE teacher like that and I think you're lying tbh.
    REALLY?! See the post I just made about my experiences, I won't repeat so as to avoid annoying everyone else, but it sounds like you've had it unusually lucky...
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    I can't help wondering what sort of people teach PE.

    At school I had no idea who they were or what their background was, I just assumed they had a background in something physical, like in the emergency services, armed forces or some kind of amateur athletics. How wrong I was.

    Now I'm at uni, it seems to be that these people just study sports degrees and then jump into education. Little wonder so few of them held any important positions amongst the faculty.
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    (Original post by ilickbatteries)
    If you have a medical problem with your sight then you should have been excluded from P.E.

    Why weren't you?
    Because our teacher was, like the vast majority of such teachers too complacent to attribute my relentless fumbling of the pigskin and general, incorrigible ineptitude at competitive ball-sports to anything other than an attitude maladjustment of the sort that might be 'fixed' through systematic browbeating or brutal coercion. He wasn't even particularly vindictive: just characteristic of that ilk in being someone whose role and remit were more akin to those of a glorified drill-sergeant than those of a true educator or - dare I say it - mentor.

    Had I manifested similar deficiency in mathematics or English, I would've been given remedial instruction. Instead, I was persecuted and ostracised for three years.

    I (much) later discovered cycling.
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    (Original post by kerily)
    I actually agree. I'm autistic and dyspraxic, and have no depth perception so I see in 2D and have no idea how far away things are from me - as such, I am horrendous at physical co-ordination, can't catch a ball, don't understand team games and am understandably bad at PE. Did my PE teachers take all this into account and let me do something like jogging instead which would at least have let me keep fit? Did my PE teachers give me extra support so I could learn how to throw and catch? Did they ****. I was just left to the mercy of the other kids - who would complain massively about having me on their team (which I fully understand!) as I was so useless, which spilt over into bullying in real life. I tried telling the PE teachers that I wasn't just lazy or stupid, I actually had reasons for being horrendous at PE and would prefer to be allowed to do stuff on my own, but they just laughed at me I am so insanely glad that I don't have to do it any more - if you're good at it and popular I'm sure it's fun, but if you're not it's just legitimised bullying.

    Not that everyone's experiences will have been like this, and not that I'm expecting sympathy, but yeah, PE in secondary schools definitely needs reforming, is my point
    yeah, I agree with this actually. As a child/ teenager I had appalling coordination and as such PE was an absolute nightmare. I used to seriously dread it. The thing is, that I'm actually physically fit and would happily have participated in something like jogging etc. PE doesn't cater for individual needs and a lot of bullying happens in PE class. I actually play sport quite often these days, because I can play with friends who won't judge.
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    Clearly one of those kids who came to PE lessons wearing a star trek t-shirt, camouflage combat shorts and Reebok classics.

    I was always rather fond of PE so I can't concur I'm afraid. I suppose this makes me an animal? Though I rather suspect it just makes you a little girly boy.
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    I hated most of P.E as we did football for most of the year. A sport which I am crap at. The only times I was happy was when we did rugby or athletics.. all I had to do was run really fast (something which i'm VERY good at) and I was fine. I think its a bit of an overstatement to say P.E is a subject for animals taught by animals. As an actual qualification, GCSE P.E and Alevel P.E I find are a WASTE of time. All it does is give an oppurtunity to people who wouldnt get good grades in human biology to get good grades. I mean a ridiculous amount of their grade is based on their sport. Some people in my school doing P.E and Biology get As in P.E but Us in biology. This just shows that p.e is NOT challenging and anyone good at sports can get a good grade
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    I really love sport, and exercise regularly, but hated PE.
    The teachers were (and still are) brainless, and had no idea about anything besides football- I'm in no way exaggerating. The male teachers made fun of me for preferring stuff like badminton over football, and I spent at least half of my lessons with the girls, playing "girls' sports" (like badminton, trampolining, and pretty much anything else where physical force wasn't paramount to success).
    At the time, I also did high jump and ran 200m for the borough athletics club, so every summer, the PE teachers would try get me to join the school team because everyone else either couldn't do athletics (probably due to the appalling teaching), or hated PE so much that they wanted nothing to do with it. I was a member of the school team for a few years, but eventually got sick of them being such oafs about everything. They also didn't appreciate that dragging me out of lessons (a few weeks before GCSEs) for competitions was damaging to my studies. In fact, they didn't really appreciate anything to do with studies at all.
    My point is that even if you were good at sport, the PE staff would still mock you for not being as laddy and obnoxious as them.

    Phew... rant over.
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    Animals? Looks like you have a chip on your shoulder mate.


    PE was alright it was an excuse to play football and other games. Didn't like the teachers though. I actually discovered that I was actually good at cricket, even though I didn't have a clue what the rules were
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    I hated PE pre-year-9, where as in Year 10/11 there was/is less lessons and those who actually take it seriously are a minority. Also, half way through Year 9 I tried doing some running in my free time, but pretty infrequently(might do it 5 days a week for two weeks, then a month goes by only going for a run 3 times or something).

    In Year 10 I started getting up at initially 5:30 AM every morning on a school day to go running to try and get better and be fitter, the byproduct being that I ended up losing quite a lot of weight which later became the objective and fitness was the byproduct. TBH I just wish I did this in Year 7 since things would have been a lot better, but in a way, you can't really expect a Year 7 to be that committed to gaining acceptance from people who you partially-despise for ~3 hours a week(lol).

    It was only at the start of Year 11(or should I say, the start of it darkening in the mornings XD) that I lost the phobia of exercising in front of people and got a gym membership(to be fair this was after going with my Dad to the police HQ's gym[he was a former inspector or something and so is allowed in free] several times). It's quite funny seeing people who used to do PE with me in pre-Year 10, they're always surprised I go to the gym and that I'm actually doing anything other than walking on the treadmill tee hee.

    But even then, it'd have been somewhat of a waste, since I have notoriously bad coordination(will frequently fall over for no real reason, will place down cups on an even surface in such a way that they still spill, have no real idea who's around me in a sports setting, etc.), if I had been fitter in Year 7. Though it's strange because my abilities are very varied, I'm good at racket-based games and for some reason hockey, but stuff like football and netball I'm pretty hopeless at.

    Sorry for the long post

    TL;DR: It's probably easier being a female and I didn't have that much problems with the PE teachers.
    In Yr 7-9 it was a lot harder not only because teachers seemed to follow the curriculum more strictly but also because I wasn't very fit but also because people seemed to care more.
    In Yr 10-11 it was/is(in Yr 11) a lot easier since I put a lot of effort into becoming fitter and also because no one seemed to really care.
    However, even with improving my fitness I still think that PE can be hard for those who do care about their fitness because you can just have bad coordination which is just an innate phenomena which can't really be improved. And even those who don't care about their fitness, they're persecuted disproportionately in PE, by someone who doesn't care about their literacy in an English lesson.
    The TL;DR was too long: I have mixed feelings on PE, and while I think the lesson could be improved, I do think to some extent the student should take on some responsibility, when possible, to improve their fitness outside of school, since it pretty much gets rid of any problems.

    EMZ=]
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    (Original post by Harrifer)
    I can't help wondering what sort of people teach PE.

    At school I had no idea who they were or what their background was, I just assumed they had a background in something physical, like in the emergency services, armed forces or some kind of amateur athletics. How wrong I was.

    Now I'm at uni, it seems to be that these people just study sports degrees and then jump into education. Little wonder so few of them held any important positions amongst the faculty.
    Seems this thread is just full of hate from kids who have absolutely no depth to their abilities.

    Almost every response in this thread is about kids who were 'brutalised' by PE teachers, yet never had the sense to go see someone higher up, consult their parents or just stay off?

    Honestly, if my P.E. teacher refused to accept I had a medical condition that seriously inhibited my sporting ability, I would NOT take part in the sport. I would flat out refuse. I would immediately consult my head of year. Yet everyone on this thread is just hating on their P.E. teacher...

    As for your bold point, completely untrue. I presume you don't teach or have any friends who are teachers?

    I play football with my old teachers, and obviously I get to find out what's going on, whos doing what at the school, etc.

    At least 3 of my former P.E. teachers have held head of year positions at my old school.

    No, I didn't go to a specialist sports school, either. P.E. teachers are just as respected as their counterparts. TSR isn't like the real world, you know. The physics teachers don't sit in their staff room at lunchtime laughing about how PE teachers did a mickey mouse course at university, especially not when as heads of year, the PE teachers are further up the payscale...
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    (Original post by tkoki1993)
    I hated most of P.E as we did football for most of the year. A sport which I am crap at. The only times I was happy was when we did rugby or athletics.. all I had to do was run really fast (something which i'm VERY good at) and I was fine. I think its a bit of an overstatement to say P.E is a subject for animals taught by animals. As an actual qualification, GCSE P.E and Alevel P.E I find are a WASTE of time. All it does is give an oppurtunity to people who wouldnt get good grades in human biology to get good grades. I mean a ridiculous amount of their grade is based on their sport. Some people in my school doing P.E and Biology get As in P.E but Us in biology. This just shows that p.e is NOT challenging and anyone good at sports can get a good grade
    No, it doesn't show that at all.

    Have you actually looked at their work? Seen what they do?

    I've seen A2 Sport coursework. Their projects are 10,000+ words. The biology is decently difficult, but obviously not as difficult as A2 biology.

    I dare say that you'd get a lower grade in Sport than you would in Biology. Sport is harder than Biology because for Biology you just need to learn the textbook inside out. For sport, you actually have to be a good sportsperson.
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    P.E. was awesome in high school, I loved cross country

    In the final half of year 11 we just did what we wanted, usually dodgeball
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    (Original post by Lizia)
    LOL. You really do have an over idealised idea of PE teaching in most schools. I know girls with asthma who weren't cut any slack when it came to cross country. And those who slipped and twisted their ankle in front of the teacher who were made to carry on, and shouted at if they slowed down. Then there was a girl who was hit in the head with a netball and not allowed to sit out, who ended up in hospital diagnosed with a concussion. Most PE teachers don't give a damn about your medical problems unless it's something that literally means you cannot move, or it's an acceptably dramatic injury like a broken leg.
    Hardly over-idealised.

    I think most people on here are grossly over-exaggerating their experiences in PE.

    Given the sheer amount of emphasis on health and safety within schools, and how little it takes for a teacher to get in serious bother, I highly doubt that any P.E. teacher would force a student with a twisted ankle to keep running.

    You're literally describing them as inhumane people whose only job was to make people suffer.

    You also describe the girls who got hurt as being totally bent to the will of the teacher.

    If you're hurt, you don't care about the shouting. You stop running or playing or whatever it is. That's the way it works. Where did you go? Borstal? Christ. :rolleyes:
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    I think the OP got picked on by the bigger, confident guys and always got picked last in choosing football teams :/
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    (Original post by Aj12)
    Really? I thought it was just an excuse to have a game of footie for an hour.
    Same here!

    Teacher says 'today we're all playing cricket'

    Pupils respond with 'that's absolutely ****e. We're playing football!'

    Every year we'd have 2 lessons that weren't football. 1 for cross country and 1 for the bleep test. Every other lesson was football. We had a good rugby team so we never played during PE lessons as we had fixed training times after school.
 
 
 
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