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    (Original post by _Shanice_)
    No-one forces you to do anything. Just wear tracksuit bottoms.
    Some schools do! I never once was allowed to wear trackies at rugby practice in 4 years, including when it was snowing....
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    (Original post by ilickbatteries)
    In all honesty, you sound like a soft sh*te.

    Man up, PE teaches you more about life than any other subject does.

    In school, whoever is academically gifted is the 'winner', in PE, whoever is sportingly gifted is the winner. It teaches a valuable lesson about the real world, where GCSEs can mean diddly squat and the bigger, tougher people rule the roost.

    The only people who don't like PE are the kids who couldn't hold their own in a sport.
    What the heck do you mean real world? In the real world the smart ones are the billionaires; Bill Gates will always be richer than David Beckham.
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    (Original post by Silent-Varjoisa)
    Reminds me of my own school you wouldn't happen to go to a school in Northern Ireland by any chance?
    No, East Anglia.
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    (Original post by Profesh)
    Because our teacher was, like the vast majority of such teachers too complacent to attribute my relentless fumbling of the pigskin and general, incorrigible ineptitude at competitive ball-sports to anything other than an attitude maladjustment of the sort that might be 'fixed' through systematic browbeating or brutal coercion. He wasn't even particularly vindictive: just characteristic of that ilk in being someone whose role and remit were more akin to those of a glorified drill-sergeant than those of a true educator or - dare I say it - mentor.

    Had I manifested similar deficiency in mathematics or English, I would've been given remedial instruction. Instead, I was persecuted and ostracised for three years.

    I (much) later discovered cycling.
    You sir, just displayed an awesome speech pattern
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    (Original post by PendulumBoB)
    Despite the title I am aware that biologically we are all animals.

    PE, in normal school bullying is against the rules; in PE it's part of the curriculum. How many times did the bigger kid who would not be allowed to be violent towards you would tell you how he was "gonna take you out in rugby".

    I remember how one of the sporty ones came into our changing rooms after rugby, his shirt covered in blood(Probably someone elses as well as his own) looking pleased with himself.


    I actually got a detention for not completing cross country fast enough; speaking of which, remember how you used to have to run around a cold field in shorts, whilst the sports overseer(wearing a rather warm looking shellsuit) would command you to go faster. PE was terrifying, in the changing rooms people would show off their pubic hair or would "keg" a man as he bent down to put his socks on.


    Discuss
    :troll:
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    (Original post by siwelmail)
    :troll:
    Is that your PE teacher?
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    (Original post by rugbyladosc)
    I always loved it but I really felt for the overweight, nerdy kids who dreaded it and got plastered in rugby and football. The PE teachers used to take the piss out of the clever kids and made them feel small because they were projecting their own insecurities (of being stupid)

    And that kid u described is me. I really regret tackling hard on kids who clearly didn't want to play
    At the very least though, you've reflected on it, you've felt sympathy, you've assessed your actions. And that's a positive thing to do.
    Hell if half the kids I knew back in school said something along those lines, it'd mean a hell of a lot.
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    At the very least though, you've reflected on it, you've felt sympathy, you've assessed your actions. And that's a positive thing to do.
    Hell if half the kids I knew back in school said something along those lines, it'd mean a hell of a lot.
    If I could go back in time I would change how I acted. We thought it was a laugh to send them to the medical room with concussion but it was uncalled for and made them hate PE. Recently I have reflected on my life and that is definitely a low point.
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    I miss PE
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    (Original post by DJkG.1)
    Yeh obviously it's not nice at the time but this is a tradition man - think about it, you don't want to grow up and face the problems of adulthood having had a 'perfect' (I wouldn't say it's healthy hence the ' ' marks) childhood where you were exposed to no trouble whatsoever.

    Rough play and mild bullying in the physical sense on the sports pitch or in the changing rooms builds character, it teacher kids to toughen up and watch their own back away from mummy and daddy, to stay out of trouble and to know their limits and what will get them into and out of trouble. There are actually very important social lessons to be learnt and that's why children should be left to interact together as occurs naturally.

    And when you get into sixth form or leave school and remember those years of dreading the rugby captain dump tackling you in practice, or having some gang of kids threaten you and your mates and getting ready for a fight every time you enter the changing rooms... you think back with fond memories. I remember the ice people used to bring in from the pond in winters to chill their knuckles in preparation (numbs the pain) should something kick off. It's strangely nostalgic like that, but it's part and parcel of school culture. :yy:

    Let's not make the next generation grow up as pansies by restricting what is natural behaviour amongst growing boys.
    That's the problem though isn't it? When you grow up, if you act like to sort of lad who thrives in that sort of environment unless you become a footballer (Which is unlikely) what will become of you?
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    (Original post by PendulumBoB)
    What the heck do you mean real world? In the real world the smart ones are the billionaires; Bill Gates will always be richer than David Beckham.
    Citing extreme examples does not validate your point.

    Intelligence isn't the only thing that gets you places.

    Besides, Bill Gates might be richer, but almost every man would rather be David Beckham.
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    (Original post by ilickbatteries)
    Citing extreme examples does not validate your point.

    Intelligence isn't the only thing that gets you places.

    Besides, Bill Gates might be richer, but almost every man would rather be David Beckham.
    No it doesn't, but think about it unless you're really good and "lucky" you're not going to do well out of sport. If you're good academically, try hard go to a good university and you should be fine. Intelligent is one of the best ways to excel at life.

    I don't care what the group of lads you call most men would prefer; those men whose wives watch x factor and kids dream of being a pop star as opposed to a doctor or lawyer.

    Besides I'd sooner have the respect of a few academics whom I respect than be some ignorant monkey respected by other ignorants.
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    (Original post by PendulumBoB)
    No it doesn't, but think about it unless you're really good and "lucky" you're not going to do well out of sport. If you're good academically, try hard go to a good university and you should be fine. Intelligent is one of the best ways to excel at life.

    I don't care what the group of lads you call most men would prefer; those men whose wives watch x factor and kids dream of being a pop star as opposed to a doctor or lawyer.

    Besides I'd sooner have the respect of a few academics whom I respect than be some ignorant monkey respected by other ignorants.
    You come across as quite ignorant yourself, to be honest.

    Being 'good academically' and going to a 'good university' doesn't mean you'll be fine. There are so, so many more qualities that are important.

    You seem like the kind of kid who can't take a bit of banter. You also assume academic success will equal life success. It doesn't always.

    "These men whose wives watch X-Factor and kids dream of being a pop star"

    My English teacher has a Doctorate. His wife watches X-Factor.

    I bet you're really snobby in real life. Get a grip kid.

    You got schooled in PE. Grow a pair, PE teaches a valuable life lesson - some of the kids you mock for being 'lesser' than you academically will own your arse on the rugby pitch. Serves you right for being an arrogant sod.
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    School PE is great, I loved it - some of my best memories of school were the mass x country, football and rugger games.

    (Original post by PendulumBoB)
    I don't care what the group of lads you call most men would prefer; those men whose wives watch x factor and kids dream of being a pop star as opposed to a doctor or lawyer.
    There's nothing wrong with a bit of popular culture.
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    My PE teacher used to come into the boys' showers and make comments about the boys - size-related comments.
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    (Original post by ilickbatteries)
    You come across as quite ignorant yourself, to be honest.

    Being 'good academically' and going to a 'good university' doesn't mean you'll be fine. There are so, so many more qualities that are important.

    You seem like the kind of kid who can't take a bit of banter. You also assume academic success will equal life success. It doesn't always.

    "These men whose wives watch X-Factor and kids dream of being a pop star"

    My English teacher has a Doctorate. His wife watches X-Factor.

    I bet you're really snobby in real life. Get a grip kid.

    You got schooled in PE. Grow a pair, PE teaches a valuable life lesson - some of the kids you mock for being 'lesser' than you academically will own your arse on the rugby pitch. Serves you right for being an arrogant sod.
    Can't take a bit of banter; have you read the posts people have left here? People who are bad at sport get completely destroyed by their PE overseer and other students. I don't do PE anymore but when I did I was really into sport outside of school, even team sports such as football. The problem is that it (And your posts reflect this) Bullying or banter as some people like to call it is encouraged.
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    (Original post by Organ)
    School PE is great, I loved it - some of my best memories of school were the mass x country, football and rugger games.



    There's nothing wrong with a bit of popular culture.
    No but you shouldn't take it too seriously
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    Well, it looks like my school was in the minority We had a very good PE department - the main teachers were all pretty soft-spoken and had good senses of humour, and were very good at teaching to boot. They would never stand for any bullying in their lessons. One guy wo taught PE as well as Maths was known for being scary (he used to be in the army) but you soon realised that it was pretty much a facade, and he was actually really nice. I mean, he could shout very loud if someone did really piss him off (being disruptive etc.), but he had a good sense of humour too. We did have one guy who came in to cover one of the main teacher's maternity leave, who was absolutely dreadful; my GCSE group could hardly wait the entire time until our main teacher came back.

    With the exception of dance and cross-country, I loved PE. I have several friends/ acquaintances who are female PE teachers and I have no doubt that they are very good teachers.
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    (Original post by Rant)
    My PE teacher used to come into the boys' showers and make comments about the boys - size-related comments.
    That's disgusting.
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    (Original post by PendulumBoB)
    That's disgusting.
    We'd usually have 3-4 teachers "checking" to make sure everyone showered - wandering fully dressed around a changing room full of naked boys. Kinky stuff.
 
 
 
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