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    I am a L6th student and approaching AS levels. Until recently, I thought I wanted to study Natural Sciences or equivilant at university. Although, I had previously rejected medicine as a potential option, I am now beginning to think that this may be something I would like to study. I terms of applying I am now behind my peers in terms of work expererience but what i concerning me more is that I am still not sure whether I should just go for medicine. I seems like a really interesting subject and the degree has all the outcomes I have been previously aiming for (reseach) with the added bonus that I could actually become a doctor.

    Any advice on how to decide or information from people that have studied medicine would be brilliant
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    I think you should shoot two birds with one stone and get some work experienced organised ASAP. You will get to see if it's the career for you and get some valuable experience for your application, or it will make you realise it isn't so you can pursue a different uni course.
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    (Original post by Sass93)
    I am a L6th student and approaching AS levels. Until recently, I thought I wanted to study Natural Sciences or equivilant at university. Although, I had previously rejected medicine as a potential option, I am now beginning to think that this may be something I would like to study. I terms of applying I am now behind my peers in terms of work expererience but what i concerning me more is that I am still not sure whether I should just go for medicine. I seems like a really interesting subject and the degree has all the outcomes I have been previously aiming for (reseach) with the added bonus that I could actually become a doctor.

    Any advice on how to decide or information from people that have studied medicine would be brilliant
    Well the only way you will find out whether you would want to actually study medicine is like BEska said, get some work experience in a hospital/shadow a doctor. Once you have done this and it is definately a career you want to go into, then you can start doing more work experience, start researching on the application process..etc
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    honestly, medicine has to be something you're dedicated to and you don't do it for research, yes you want to learn more but you want to be in a position to help others as well both directly and indirectly from what you're learning, if you just want to do research you can do that though any scientific route. Medicine should be something you have no doubts about and a career you genuinely want to follow, not just because being a doctor is an added bonus to your social status.
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    nah
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    (Original post by Sass93)
    I am a L6th student and approaching AS levels. Until recently, I thought I wanted to study Natural Sciences or equivilant at university. Although, I had previously rejected medicine as a potential option, I am now beginning to think that this may be something I would like to study. I terms of applying I am now behind my peers in terms of work expererience but what i concerning me more is that I am still not sure whether I should just go for medicine. I seems like a really interesting subject and the degree has all the outcomes I have been previously aiming for (reseach) with the added bonus that I could actually become a doctor.

    Any advice on how to decide or information from people that have studied medicine would be brilliant
    WTF? Do you actually want to practice medicine? :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Sass93)
    I am a L6th student and approaching AS levels. Until recently, I thought I wanted to study Natural Sciences or equivilant at university. Although, I had previously rejected medicine as a potential option, I am now beginning to think that this may be something I would like to study. I terms of applying I am now behind my peers in terms of work expererience but what i concerning me more is that I am still not sure whether I should just go for medicine. I seems like a really interesting subject and the degree has all the outcomes I have been previously aiming for (reseach) with the added bonus that I could actually become a doctor.

    Any advice on how to decide or information from people that have studied medicine would be brilliant
    For your mental health's sake, if you are interested in research, do a research orientated science degree.

    Don't spend three years of your life flogging around different hospitals for zero pay!
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    (Original post by Sass93)
    I am a L6th student and approaching AS levels. Until recently, I thought I wanted to study Natural Sciences or equivilant at university. Although, I had previously rejected medicine as a potential option, I am now beginning to think that this may be something I would like to study. I terms of applying I am now behind my peers in terms of work expererience but what i concerning me more is that I am still not sure whether I should just go for medicine. I seems like a really interesting subject and the degree has all the outcomes I have been previously aiming for (reseach) with the added bonus that I could actually become a doctor.

    Any advice on how to decide or information from people that have studied medicine would be brilliant
    Do what you want, seriously asking here isn't gonna help you make the decision too well - I would suggest not taking the advice on here too seriously and prolly get some work exp at a local hospital asap.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    For your mental health's sake, if you are interested in research, do a research orientated science degree.

    Don't spend three years of your life flogging around different hospitals for zero pay!
    there are lots of good reasons not to do a medical degree if what you really want is to do preclinical research.

    pay is probably not the best one you could have chosen!
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    (Original post by thisismycatch22)
    there are lots of good reasons not to do a medical degree if what you really want is to do preclinical research.

    pay is probably not the best one you could have chosen!
    When dig says zero pay, I think he actually means no pay minus tuition fees, rent, living expenses for three years of degree that the OP neither wants nor needs.
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    I'd say get some work experience and then apply and see how you feel about it. You have 5 choices on your UCAS form anyway use one for natural sciences. They might consider you regardless of your personal statement being geared towards medicine.

    The reason I say this is that I think I was like you three years ago. I was scared I wasn't as determined as the other students to study medicine and they all knew something that I didn't - how were they all so certain? I did work experience (My first week was terrible, my second week I nearly passed out) and ruled medicine out. I started another course at uni, but it just wasn't right, and I obsessed daily over becoming a doctor. I dropped out, reapplied for medicine and I'm now in the middle of my degree, and I love it.

    I know our situations probably aren't entirely comparable but:
    - don't be intimidated by others who are more certain or have more experience go for it
    - get work experience, and even if you don't understand what is going on all the time it will give you insight
    - appreciate medicine gives you the opportunity to use your brain, so if the reason you want to go into research is that you like thinking and problem solving them it could be for you
    - you can always kill two birds with one stone and put natural sciences down as your extra option on ucas

    Hope this helps.
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    (Original post by Sass93)
    I am a L6th student and approaching AS levels. Until recently, I thought I wanted to study Natural Sciences or equivilant at university. Although, I had previously rejected medicine as a potential option, I am now beginning to think that this may be something I would like to study. I terms of applying I am now behind my peers in terms of work expererience but what i concerning me more is that I am still not sure whether I should just go for medicine. I seems like a really interesting subject and the degree has all the outcomes I have been previously aiming for (reseach) with the added bonus that I could actually become a doctor.

    Any advice on how to decide or information from people that have studied medicine would be brilliant
    If you want to do research there are plenty of degrees out there geared specifically for that. Physiology at Oxford, for instance, is basically the medical course but minus the clinical stuff and you spend an extra year doing medical research (as in, you do it second and third year instead of just third year).

    Medicine can lead to research of course - at Oxbridge the tutors seem to WANT the best students to give up clinical and stay there making medical discoveries. However, if you have no interest in clinical medicine at all then there are better options than studying medicine.
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    (Original post by Renal)
    When dig says zero pay, I think he actually means no pay minus tuition fees, rent, living expenses for three years of degree that the OP neither wants nor needs.
    research: 3/4 years undergrad tuition fees and no pay, 3/4 years of PhD salary ~14k tax free, often the 4th year is writing up with no pay whatsoever. and that's if you get a bbsrc or equivalent grant, many phds nowadays are self funded thanks to the state of the university sector.

    then *try* to find a postdoc position (the majority of phds do not) which pays, after your 6-8 years training, about as much an F1 or F2 makes with far shakier career prospects that involve waiting for people to die, in a rapidly defunded research sector.



    medicine: 4 years undergrad tuition fees and no pay, 1/2 years NHS bursary with no pay but occasionally some living costs.

    then straight into a more or less guaranteed job after 5/6 years training at 24k unbanded and rapidly rising with excellent career prospects.


    I don't think the couple of extra years of uni that doctors do means they are suffering financially in even the middle term, compared to academic scientists. Not saying it's an easier life or that it's undeserved whatsoever, just saying that moaning about finance is not going to win much sympathy with academic researchers.
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    Another I want to study medicine thread, without a solid reason.
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    let alone talking about end career pay, and comparing GPs playing the QOF game and consultants with CEAs to a professor's salary...
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    (Original post by There will be Particles)
    Do what you want, seriously asking here isn't gonna help you make the decision too well - I would suggest not taking the advice on here too seriously and prolly get some work exp at a local hospital asap.
    Im not so sure...there is no better thing than your own experience for sure. But some prefreshers, as it were, are extremely naive to the realities of medicine and medical school...I know I was, sometimes advice from those who have been there and got the t shirt is helpful too.
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    (Original post by thisismycatch22)
    I don't think the couple of extra years of uni that doctors do means they are suffering financially in even the middle term, compared to academic scientists. Not saying it's an easier life or that it's undeserved whatsoever, just saying that moaning about finance is not going to win much sympathy with academic researchers.
    To put the OP's plan in terms similar to what you've used;

    "4 years undergrad tuition fees and no pay, 1/2 years NHS bursary with no pay but occasionally some living costs."

    Followed by;

    "3/4 years of PhD salary ~14k tax free, often the 4th year is writing up with no pay whatsoever. and that's if you get a bbsrc or equivalent grant, many phds nowadays are self funded thanks to the state of the university sector.

    then *try* to find a postdoc position (the majority of phds do not) which pays, after your 6-8 years training, about as much an F1 or F2 makes with far shakier career prospects that involve waiting for people to die, in a rapidly defunded research sector."

    If the OP wants to research and doesn't want to practice medicine, the clinical bit of the medical degree is a little wasted.
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    well, yeah, if your plan is to apply for a phd studentship and then a postdoc after medicine undergrad that's pretty stupid, agreed, but i was under the impression that op would do something like an academic medicine career track, or even just practice medicine + publish the occasional research paper.

    i mean, they're a 16/17 year old trying to choose a degree, i don't think they implied anywhere that they definitely knew their life plan was "all research all the time"
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    (Original post by Miss_Scarlett)
    Im not so sure...there is no better thing than your own experience for sure. But some prefreshers, as it were, are extremely naive to the realities of medicine and medical school...I know I was, sometimes advice from those who have been there and got the t shirt is helpful too.
    Yeah ofc I'm not saying disregard all the advice totally, just not to take it 'too' seriously since some people tend to be overly pessimistic
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    (Original post by thisismycatch22)
    but occasionally some living costs.
    Occasionally some living costs - how are living costs occassional?!

    If the OP doesn't want to be primarilly a doctor then he/she shouldn't do medicine. If the OP wants to be primarilly a research scientist then he/she should do a science degree.

    Medicine isn't a science degree. The final 3 years are spent in a hospital and are vocational - I'd imagine I'd find them pretty painful if I didn't want to be a doctor at the end of it...
 
 
 
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