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MSc Economics UCL, RHUL, Mannheim, Frankfurt watch

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    Hey everyone,

    I've received an offer for the MSc Economic Policy at UCL and also for the MSc Economics at Royal Holloway. I am also applying to the universities of Mannheim and Frankfurt in Germany. The courses are all fairly equal and all taught in English but the Germans ones are 2 year degrees (so they conform with Bologna rules) and considerably cheaper than UCL's £13,500.
    My dream job would be to work for a central bank in Frankfurt (either the German one or the ECB if possible).

    Would you say its worth paying a fortune for a UCL course in order to stand a better chance of getting into central banking? I also haven't got any idea of the international reputation of German unis.

    These are the options:

    UCL MSc Economic Policy, £13,500, 1 yr (still waiting on decision for MSc Economics)
    RHUL MSc Economics, £3,500, 1 yr
    Mannheim, MSc Economics, ~£1,000 p.a., 2 yr
    Frankfurt, MSc International Economics and Economic Policy, ~£400 p.a., 2 yr

    Any advice would be great!! Cheers.
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    any opinions?
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    I know the Goethe University in Frankfurt is very reputable. I don't know about economics specifically but I've been at the university and it's definitely one of the best in Germany, if not in Europe. Frankfurt is also a great city. Probably the best place to be for employment in the financial world. Best of luck in whatever you do.
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    (Original post by Gaeilgeoir)
    I know the Goethe University in Frankfurt is very reputable. I don't know about economics specifically but I've been at the university and it's definitely one of the best in Germany, if not in Europe. Frankfurt is also a great city. Probably the best place to be for employment in the financial world. Best of luck in whatever you do.
    Great, that's a good piece of advice. Thx for your feedback.

    Does anyone else know anything about Mannheim?
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    Both Mannheim and Frankfurt are very good Universities. Both are prestigious, Mannheim probably a bit more. If you do well in the Master, both will help you equally with your wish to go into central banking.

    Another note: Do you know that studying Economics in Germany is really technical? At the Masters level the rigorousness is much higher than in any UK university. How confident are you with your maths and econometrics?

    EDIT: and if you really want to work in central banking, either Frankfurt or Mannheim will probably be better than UCL's Economic Policy (why didn't you apply for the "normal" MSc?).
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    (Original post by George_85)
    Both Mannheim and Frankfurt are very good Universities. Both are prestigious, Mannheim probably a bit more. If you do well in the Master, both will help you equally with your wish to go into central banking.

    Another note: Do you know that studying Economics in Germany is really technical? At the Masters level the rigorousness is much higher than in any UK university. How confident are you with your maths and econometrics?

    EDIT: and if you really want to work in central banking, either Frankfurt or Mannheim will probably be better than UCL's Economic Policy (why didn't you apply for the "normal" MSc?).
    Thanks for your advice, very helpful indeed.

    I am fairly confident about maths and stats and have received firsts in all empirical and econometric modules so far. I thought it would be technical (especially as its a two year course) but even more than say the MSc Economics at UCL?

    I have applied for that one too by the way, just don't know the outcome yet. Even if I got admitted to the normal MSc, it would probably not be worth the 13.5k in fees as I am unlikely to receive funding.
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    Yes, more technical then MSc Economics at UCL. If you want to go to central banking, the decision between Frankfurt/Mannheim and UCL Economic Policy is really a no-brainer...
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    (Original post by George_85)
    Yes, more technical then MSc Economics at UCL.
    What's your basis for this claim?
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    Knowing lecture notes and syllabi of Mannheim and UCL.
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    (Original post by George_85)
    Both Mannheim and Frankfurt are very good Universities. Both are prestigious, Mannheim probably a bit more. If you do well in the Master, both will help you equally with your wish to go into central banking.

    Another note: Do you know that studying Economics in Germany is really technical? At the Masters level the rigorousness is much higher than in any UK university. How confident are you with your maths and econometrics?

    EDIT: and if you really want to work in central banking, either Frankfurt or Mannheim will probably be better than UCL's Economic Policy (why didn't you apply for the "normal" MSc?).
    Rubbish.
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    (Original post by Ilustrius)
    Rubbish.
    This
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    In germany a lot of the courses taught at undergrad level are taught at postgrad in the UK. I know a lot of exchange students having problems when going to the UK because they needed to enroll into MSc level courses to get credit towards their BA/BSc in germany.
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    People here seem to be disputing whether German economics courses are more mathematically rigorous than UK ones and I'd like to see some evidence either way if any of you have some; it would be interesting to see. I'd like to study Economics at Warwick or Bristol at undergraduate level and then go onto postgraduate in Germany (much cheaper). Does anyone know if this is possible? (with regards to the UK degree preparing you for the mathematical side of the German course).

    Thanks in advance
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    (Original post by thegenius31416)
    People here seem to be disputing whether German economics courses are more mathematically rigorous than UK ones and I'd like to see some evidence either way if any of you have some; it would be interesting to see. I'd like to study Economics at Warwick or Bristol at undergraduate level and then go onto postgraduate in Germany (much cheaper). Does anyone know if this is possible? (with regards to the UK degree preparing you for the mathematical side of the German course).

    Thanks in advance
    Anyone know the answer to my question? (Bump)
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    I am not sure how to "proof" that to you. Having studied for UG and PG in the UK and comparing what I did with what friends of mine did in Germany, my opinion is that UG is a lot more technical in Germany, and that PG courses in the UK are so intense because they are catching up on some maths. But note that "more technical" and "more mathematical" does not mean "better" - it is just a different approach.

    Anyway, some people will disagree with that, but I build my opinion on knowing several people who study economics in Germany and the UK at good Universities.

    If you plan to go to Germany later I would take as many math modules as possible. And if you do well and understand the material, then you will be fine in Germany (and may have some advantage when it comes to intuition).
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    (Original post by George_85)
    I am not sure how to "proof" that to you. Having studied for UG and PG in the UK and comparing what I did with what friends of mine did in Germany, my opinion is that UG is a lot more technical in Germany, and that PG courses in the UK are so intense because they are catching up on some maths. But note that "more technical" and "more mathematical" does not mean "better" - it is just a different approach.

    Anyway, some people will disagree with that, but I build my opinion on knowing several people who study economics in Germany and the UK at good Universities.

    If you plan to go to Germany later I would take as many math modules as possible. And if you do well and understand the material, then you will be fine in Germany (and may have some advantage when it comes to intuition).
    Hmmm, ok, that's a bit reassuring that you're saying a masters in Germany is not too technical if I've only had an undergraduate course in the UK to prepare. I'll definitely be taking the most mathematical modules available to me.

    Mind me asking where you studied undergrad in the UK?
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    Edinburgh.
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    (Original post by George_85)
    Edinburgh.
    I'm planning on applying there. What did you think of the course/university?

    I would probably go for maths and economics joint honours as this would be better preparation for postgraduate studies.
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    I am very sorry that i can't give you any idea....I applied for MSc in Economics in UCL...And they rejected me....
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    (Original post by hwang)
    I am very sorry that i can't give you any idea....I applied for MSc in Economics in UCL...And they rejected me....
    Sorry to hear that. When did they let you know? I heard about Economic Policy ages ago and still not heard a thing about Economics. :confused:
 
 
 
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