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Are you Guarantee a uni place if you meet your offer? watch

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    My teacher and people on tsr have been giving the impression that even if i meet my offer i am not guarantee places is their any truth to this?

    Thanks for any help
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    ....... if the give you a conditional offer and you get the grades then dont they have to give you the place??
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    If you have been made a conditional offer and you achieve the results then you are guaranteed the place. Any offer made by a university is legally binding and if you meet or exceed the offer they must offer you the place.

    Anyone who tells you any different is wrong.

    You should note that if, for example, you are offered ABB and you achieve AAC, this does not count as meeting the offer and the university can decline you if they so choose.
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    If you meet the grades for your firm choice, you will get your place.

    However, you've probably read some of the shock stories on here about universities being oversubscribed and trying to lose a few students so that they don't get fined... Whether those stories are true or not is debateable (this is the internet after all), but it is in the ucas agreement that the university must take you if you get your grades.
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    (Original post by Uni in the UK)
    If you have been made a conditional offer and you achieve the results then you are guaranteed the place. Any offer made by a university is legally binding and if you meet or exceed the offer they must offer you the place.

    Anyone who tells you any different is wrong.

    You should note that if, for example, you are offered ABB and you achieve AAC, this does not count as meeting the offer and the university can decline you if they so choose.
    But where does it say its Legally binding :/ cause my teacher said this is bull**** because students are able to pull back their places, so the uni's are able to?

    should i just ask ucas this or do you have any sources?

    it would be really great full if anyone has any proof to back this up thank you
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    (Original post by FinalMH)
    But where does it say its Legally binding :/ cause my teacher said this is bull**** because students are able to pull back their places, so the uni's are able to?

    should i just ask ucas this or do you have any sources?

    it would be really great full if anyone has any proof to back this up thank you
    Why do you assume this will happen to you?

    Try not to worry, focus on your work and exams. It's enough to worry about getting the grades let alone worrying about scaremongering.

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    (Original post by Uni in the UK)
    If you have been made a conditional offer and you achieve the results then you are guaranteed the place. Any offer made by a university is legally binding and if you meet or exceed the offer they must offer you the place.

    Anyone who tells you any different is wrong.

    You should note that if, for example, you are offered ABB and you achieve AAC, this does not count as meeting the offer and the university can decline you if they so choose.
    They are not legally bound to you after making an offer. It's rare, but course overflow can result in some people being coerced into taking gap years or not making it onto the course at all.

    People spout the same "it's legally binding!" crap every year and it's not factually correct.
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    (Original post by FinalMH)
    But where does it say its Legally binding :/ cause my teacher said this is bull**** because students are able to pull back their places, so the uni's are able to?

    should i just ask ucas this or do you have any sources?

    it would be really great full if anyone has any proof to back this up thank you
    Well, obviously. Everyone can break a contract, however in the case of the university doing it without reason. (The only one justifiable to me would be some kind of misconduct, cheating, lying on the UCAS app.) I'm almost sure you would be able to challenge this legally in some way.
    -Just to note I'm not sure whether it's actually a contract.

    Your teacher sounds like an idiot. If you attain the grades set down in your firm/Insurance offer you will get into the university (unless you decide not to go.) It'd be idiotic for universities to just not honor people's offer. Nobody would apply, in that case.

    The times you probably have heard are most likely institutional errors (University giving place accidentally, results being wrong or UCAS updating wrongly.)

    These happen really rarely, and are usually fixed. Seriously, contact UCAS if you want, but they're just gonna tell you it'll all be okay. Which it will, don't get so worried.

    Focus on getting the grades. If you end up not getting a place, despite getting the grades (again... incredibly rare.) THEN worry about it. When it happens. You don't stand at the roadside fretting for 10 minutes about whether you're gonna get run over if you cross, do you?
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    (Original post by FinalMH)
    But where does it say its Legally binding :/ cause my teacher said this is bull**** because students are able to pull back their places, so the uni's are able to?

    should i just ask ucas this or do you have any sources?

    it would be really great full if anyone has any proof to back this up thank you
    The contract doesn't include "you must come to our university though" (although it does extend as far as the university preventing you going anywhere else if you change your mind at the last minute). It works in the form If X, then Y. If you keep your side of the contract (meeting the offer) then they have to give you a place (their side of the offer). Every year some universities end up offering actual financial gain to people prepared to defer for a year when they are over subscribed. If they could just withdraw the place then there is no way they would do that!

    Your teaching is wrong.
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    (Original post by FinalMH)
    But where does it say its Legally binding :/ cause my teacher said this is bull**** because students are able to pull back their places, so the uni's are able to?

    should i just ask ucas this or do you have any sources?

    it would be really great full if anyone has any proof to back this up thank you
    Students cannot "pull out" easily. If they meet their offer they are obliged to go to that university. This isn't to say they are forced to take the offer as such. They can reject it. But, if they do, they will completely withdraw from UCAS.

    A student can ask a university to release them (the student will then go into clearing). However, the university is not obliged to release the student as far as I'm aware.

    (Original post by NS17)
    They are not legally bound to you after making an offer. It's rare, but course overflow can result in some people being coerced into taking gap years or not making it onto the course at all.

    People spout the same "it's legally binding!" crap every year and it's not factually correct.
    "Following acceptance by a department and college, the DDS is forwarded to Student Recruitment and Admissions Office, who communicate the legally binding decision to UCAS." (4.3).

    http://www.ucas.ac.uk/students/resul...andoffers/faq1

    There will also be information on UCAS.

    It is binding according to the rules of UCAS. A university will usually only withdraw an offer if the student is found to have deceived the university (stating incorrect grades, for example).

    If course overflow results then a university then the university won't "reject" the student those who wish to take a gap year (or ask to take a gap year on results day) will usually be allowed.

    It's certainly the case that no university will want to attract the negative publicity were they to withdraw an offer, or give the student an offer for the following year. Look at Exeter a year or two back (I think it was Exeter).
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    Not another thread on this! There was a thread in the last week or so, posted by someone who lost his offer because the university had decided not to offer the course he had applied for, even though offers had been made.

    The phrase legally binding is loosely used in this context, and wrong, as has been pointed out by NS17.

    However, you won't lose your place arbitrarily so stop worrying.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Not another thread on this! There was a thread in the last week or so, posted by someone who lost his offer because the university had decided not to offer the course he had applied for, even though offers had been made.

    The phrase legally binding is loosely used in this context, and wrong, as has been pointed out by NS17.

    However, you won't lose your place arbitrarily so stop worrying.
    :/ i m sorry and i m great full for everyone who has responded

    makes me feel more reassured

    I apologize for if i have annoyed anyone :/
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    Ok, what are the chances of getting onto the course if you are 35 UCAS points under?
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    (Original post by tgh)
    Ok, what are the chances of getting onto the course if you are 35 UCAS points under?
    Depends on the course, cause you dont meet the conditions

    this thread was about meeting your conditions
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    (Original post by tgh)
    Ok, what are the chances of getting onto the course if you are 35 UCAS points under?
    Obviously it depends on the course/uni/other applicants, however being very nearly two grades below the offer is pretty dodge.
 
 
 
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