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    I've just started going back to the gym, with the aim of bulking up, after a long break - due to a bad collar bone injury.

    At first, I was getting the usual aches and pains after training, which I've always perceived as a good thing; sort of a sign of hard work. However, in the past 2 weeks, I've had very little in the way of aches, and after some sessions, I've had no aches at all, even if the following days.

    At first, I thought that maybe I wasn't trying hard enough, but I'm doing sets of 8 reps at the highest weight I can manage, until I fail. Sometimes I even go back, later in the routine, to squeeze an extra set out; sometimes failing again. I've tried dropping the weight after failing, and getting an extra set or so at a slightly lower weight, but still I'm getting no aches.

    Basically, why have they disappeared? Is it a bad thing that I'm getting no aches after training? I've never had anything like this happen before.
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    I thought not aching was a good thing?

    It shows that you have stretched properly, and warmed up and allowed your muscles to cool down before and after your work out respectively
    I'm sure someone could correct me on the exact biology that happens, but you shouldn't aim to ache after a workout.

    I mean yes you want some evidence of you putting in hard work, but I always put that down to the work in the gym - sweat, pushing yourself, breathlessness etc and also the physical evidence after a period of working out.

    but you don't want to feel in pain after every time you go to the gym, otherwise you could risk injury.
    When you start going initially your body is not likely to be used to the increase in physical activity, and will likely ache after the first few times of going, but that feeling shouldn't last.
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    Basically, it just means you're used to the training. If you did something crazy (not necessarily productive) you'd be sore again. Focus on the improvement e.g. more weight, more reps, more distance travelled, more volume, better technique, better bar speed/path rather than the soreness. You can get big without getting sore. All that getting sore means is that you're not used to something. So for example, I changed my clean/deadlift pulling style. My hamstrings are now sore. They won't be next week.
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    Ok, that's good to know. I just assumed I would be sore, as I am constantly upping the weight and number of sets, to the maximum I can manage.

    Thanks for your help!
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    DOMS google it, and you will find your answer.
 
 
 
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